Mirror Mirror – Sarah Treem

mirror

First per­formed at the Yale School of Drama on Novem­ber 11, 2005.

 Orig­i­nal Cast:

Gretchen Black – 17, Most pop­u­lar girl in school.                     Corena Chase
Bad­ger Biers – 17, Gretchen’s boyfriend.                                   Allen Read
Most pop­u­lar boy in school. Cap­tain of the foot­ball team.    
Costen Lyons – 18, Badger’s best friend.                                  Jacob Knoll
     Rich­est boy in school.
Libby Sun­day – 17, Gretchen’s new best friend.
                       Alexis McGuin­ness
     Hoyt’s ex-girlfriend. Vale­dic­to­rian. On schol­ar­ship.
Hoyt Mon­roe – 18, Tor­tured teenage artist.
                               Richard Gal­lagher
     Libby’s ex-boyfriend.
Lau­rel Buchanan – 16, Hoyt’s best friend. Pres­i­dent
               Brid­get Jones
     of the drama club. Costen’s sec­ond cousin.
Honey – 15, Stage man­ager in the drama club. Nerd.
               Lau­ren Wor­sham
Don­nie – 17, Actor in the drama club. Ronnie’s best friend.    Alexan­der Rubin
Ron­nie – 17, Actor in the drama club. Donnie’s best friend.    Paul Spera
Roy/Rose White – 16, New girl. This is a boy’s part.                 Blake Hack­ler

Direc­tor:  Nick Avila
Set Design:  Sara Clement
Cos­tume Design:  Mike Floyd
Light­ing Design:  Bryan Keller
Sound Design:  Sharath Patel
Dra­maturgy:  Rachel Rusch
Stage Man­ager:  Adam Gan­der­son

 Pub­li­ca­tion:  Treem, Sara. Mir­ror Mir­ror. Samuel French, 2010. Drama Gen­eral Stacks PS3620.R442 M57 2010.

Set­ting:  A pri­vate high school in the South. A gym. An audi­to­rium. A bath­room. Fall, present day.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

GRETCHEN

(con­sid­ers that) No, not in the same way. Bod­ies heal. Babies can be aborted. But rep­u­ta­tions? That shit never goes away. Your children’s chil­dren pay for that. (beat) So did you get a look?

Genre/Style:   Dra­matic comedy

Plot:  A year ago Roy dis­ap­peared.  This home­com­ing, his sister’s boyfriend, the cap­tain of the foot­ball team, is about to pro­pose to her even though he’s hid­ing a secret.  When a mys­te­ri­ous girl appears, Roy dis­guised as Rose, the insu­lar world of a pri­vate high school in the South is turned upside down.  Loosely based on Snow White, the play feels like a darker ver­sion of your typ­i­cal teen drama with some mys­ti­cal moments.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.9:  Gretchen talks to the bath­room mir­ror dur­ing home­com­ing after hav­ing seen some­thing dis­turb­ing in it.  (long mono­logue)

GRETCHEN

Don’t you pull that shit with me. I will break you.

When I was a child I had a beau­ti­ful mir­ror. Gilded and very old. It was my great grandmother’s mir­ror. Brought over from Vienna on a first class steamer. The mir­ror hung in the grand hall­way. I cleaned it inces­santly. Every time I passed it.

[lines cut]

What do you sup­posed I did? I broke the mir­ror. Smashed it in, late one night, with the heel of my shoe. Then I picked up the shat­tered pieces of glass and sewed them into my skin. And from that day forth, I’ve car­ried them with me wher­ever I go. And every­one every­where always asks me about my skin. They want to know what makes it shim­mer so.

(GRETCHEN looks down at her feet. She smirks at the mir­ror.)

(a threat) What do you think of my shoes? Are the heels too high?

p.48:  Honey tries to explain to Rose (who is Roy in dis­guise) what it was about Roy that she loved. 

HONEY

No. It was some­thing else. He went around smil­ing at people—indiscriminately and for no good rea­son. Like w were all chil­dren again. It freaked a lot of peo­ple out. [Lines cut] And Bad­ger Biers sort of smiled back. It was the most incred­i­ble thing I’ve ever seen. I went home and wrote twelve pages about it in my jour­nal. If Roy hadn’t got­ten sick I would have asked him to Homecoming.

p.53–54:  Hoyt gives his rea­sons for why he believes love is a dis­ease. (very long monologue)

HOYT

This has noth­ing to do with Libby. Love is a dis­ease. It’s chem­i­cal. They’ve proven it. It’s just hor­mones. That stim­u­late eupho­ria. In this one tiny sec­tion of the brain. The same tiny sec­tion that lights up when peo­ple snort coke.[Lines cut] And thus he per­pet­u­ates the ulti­mate cos­mic joke. That love makes life worth liv­ing. Which we all read. And believe. Because we’re chil­dren and stu­pid. And then we grow up and fall into the exact same trap. And spend the remain­der of our lives in per­pet­ual rehab with the rest of humanity.

 p.67:  Libby riffs on her anorexia and her intelligence. 

LIBBY

 I can hon­estly believe what­ever I want, Hoyt. You have no idea how pow­er­ful I actu­ally am. I can stay up for three days straight on noth­ing but whipped cream, cof­fee and suger-free jello. Do you know how many calo­ries that is, Hoyt? [Lines cut] And I can think about food almost every moment of every day so can you imag­ine how much more I would know if I never had to eat again? No, of course you can’t. Because you’re not nearly as smart as me.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes:  Scenes con­tain the first person’s lines and the last person’s lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the scene in its entirety.

p. 15–19:  Libby finds Gretchen in the bath­room dur­ing home­com­ing.  Libby’s wear­ing one of Gretchen’s hand-me-down dresses; Gretchen wants it back. In the end, she leaves Libby in the bath­room in her bra and under­wear.  Starts with

LIBBY

Gretchen! There you are. What’s that smell?

and ends with

GRETCHEN

Grow up. Wear a thong.

p.27–29:  Honey meets Rose for the first time and reveals what hap­pened to Roy, who is dis­guised as Rose.   Starts with

HONEY

One two three. One two three. One two three.

and ends with

HONEY

I’m sorry Rose, you seem really nice and all but you’ve got a mouth as dirty as a sailor and it makes me kind of uncomfortable—being a dweeb and all—so I’m gonna go now.

p.66–68:  Hoyt con­fronts Libby about her anorexia and con­fesses that he still loves her even though she’s now dat­ing Costen.   Starts with

LIBBY

Is she crazy?

and ends with

LIBBY

I like being light, Hoyt. I want to be lighter. I want to be so light I could step into the air if I were ever in trou­ble and fly away.

p.69–73:  Roy con­fronts Bad­ger in the Boys Locker Room and tries to get Bad­ger to admit that he loves him and wants to be with him as a gay man instead of mar­ry­ing his sis­ter, Gretchen, and liv­ing a lie.  Starts with

BADGER

Mag­got, mag­gots, maggots.

and ends with

BADGER

My locker is num­ber 27 if you need some clothes. Please—don’t fol­low me.

 

 

 

 

Shivered-Philip Ridley

Automotive-assembly-line

First per­formed at the South­wark Play­house in Lon­don on March 9, 2012.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Alec—a  20-year-old sol­dier                      Rob­bie Jarvis-Dean
Ryan—a twelve-year-old boy                    Joseph Drake
Jack—a twelve-year-old boy                     Joshua Williams
Lyn—Alec and Ryan’s mom                       Olivia Poulet
Gordy—in his twen­ties, a con man           Andrew Haw­ley
Evie—Jack’s obese mother                      Amanda Daniels
Mikey—Alec and Ryan’s dad                     Simon Lena­gan

Direc­tor:  Rus­sell Bolam
Scenic and Cos­tume Design:  Anthony Lam­ble
Light­ing Design:  Richard How­ell
Sound Design:  Tom Gibbons

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Rid­ley, Philip. Shiv­ered. Drama­tists Play Ser­vice, Inc., 2013. Drama Library Stacks PR6068.I292 S38 2013.

Set­ting:  Draylingstowe in Essax, an auto­mo­tive fac­tory town that has gone bust.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

Jack

No, mate!  My legs’re fuck­ing hurt­ing.  I can feel the veins knot­ting together like… like knotting-together stuff.  They hurt! Fuck!

Genre/Style:   Dramatic/comedy

Plot:   Ryan and Jack are two twelve-year-old boys look­ing for aliens.  Ryan’s  brother, Alec, was a sol­dier whose behead­ing by the enemy was filmed and shared on the inter­net.  Ryan’s dad, a for­mer auto­mo­tive fac­tory worker, has gone miss­ing; and his mother can’t cope with their son’s death.  The play is frag­mented and the scenes are out of order, reflect­ing the frag­men­ta­tion of modern-day life and illu­mi­nat­ing often-overlooked details with the ben­e­fit of hind­sight.  The first act works bet­ter than the sec­ond, but the lan­guage and themes remain affect­ing.  Although the boys are twelve in the play, teens or col­lege aged actors would be appro­pri­ate as the sub­ject mat­ter is quite mature.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.25:  Jack tells Ryan what hap­pened to this girl at school who didn’t want to watch the video of Ryan’s brother being beheaded.

JACK     

There was this girl. Gemma Burns. She’s the year above me. She said she thought watch­ing some­thing like that was dis­gust­ing. She don’t watch any­thing. Not even  bull­fights or dogs being sick. She’s a right stuck-up cunt.  [Lines cut] Reece Jack­son said they should break into Gemma’s bed­room one night and hold her down like they did in the toi­lets, only this time make her watch the film of her throw­ing up while watch­ing your brother’s head being cut off. I said, if they did that, I’d like to be the one to film it. (Slight pause.) I think it’s a fake anyway.

p.33:  Gordy tells Lyn what hap­pens to grey­hounds once they stop racing.

GORDY

You know what hap­pens to grey­hounds when they stop win­ning races. They’re killed. That was my job. I’d take them to the wood at the back of the sta­dium. I’d tie their leads round branches. Leave them to hang.  [Lines cut] Next time I did it, word had spread. There were twice as many peo­ple. I charged them money. Every time I did it the audi­ence grew. I made more money from killing the dogs than my neigh­bor did from rac­ing them. (Slight pause) Wanna meet later?

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes:  Scenes con­tain the first person’s lines and the last person’s lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the scene in its entirety.

p. 10–12:  Ryan and Jack are watch­ing the canal and wait­ing for the alien mon­ster to appear so that Ryan can take a pic­ture of it.  Starts with

RYAN

Okay… If any­thing comes out of the canal—We’re ready!

and ends with

RYAN

I see it! (Jack and Ryan scream.)

p.27–29:  The first time Jack and Ryan meet.  Jack is hid­ing out from a group of bul­lies and Ryan is try­ing to find evi­dence of aliens to prove his dad isn’t crazy.   Starts with

JACK

What are you doing?

and ends with

RYAN AND JACK

RAAAAHHHH!!!

p.38–40:  Jack and Ryan are again wait­ing for aliens.  Ryan shows Jack how to draw aliens.  Dur­ing their les­son, Jack con­vinces Ryan to look at the video of Ryan’s brother being beheaded. At the end of the scene Ryan beats Jack uncon­scious and leaves him.  The beat­ing leaves Jack brain dead.   Starts with

JACK

You mean… aliens look like snakes.

and ends with

JACK

Fuck me, no need for that, mate. Jesus. (Strug­gles to get up.) Help me up, mate… Come on… My bones are bend­ing in this position—Shit! Shit! (Ryan picks up a piece of rub­ble.) Come on, mate.   (Ryan strikes Jack with rub­ble.) Mate, what’s that for? Come on! (Slight pause. Ryan strikes Jack again.) There no need for—Mate! Don’t! (Ryan hits Jack some more. Jack is scream­ing now.) Stop it, mate. It’s fuck­ing hurt­ing… Don’t! Mate! Let’s do some draw­ing. (Ryan con­tin­ues to strike Jack.) Let’s do… some drawing…

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Bowie-Sell, D. (2012, Apr 2). Shiv­ered, South­wark Play­house, review. [open access] The Tele­graph.

Costa, M. (2012, Mar 15). Shivered—review. [open access] The Guardian.

Purves, L. (2012, Mar 15). It’s grim­mer down south; Philip Ridley’s vio­lent new Essex drama leaves Libby Purves unmoved. The Times (Lon­don), pp.12.

Tay­lor, P.  (2012, Mar 15). Shiv­ered, South­wark Play­house, Lon­don. [open access] The Inde­pen­dent.

 

36 and Counting!

Status

June 27 marked a year since I began That Unfor­get­table Line, and I’ve posted infor­ma­tion on 36 plays.  I’m hop­ing to add 50 plays this next year!  If you’ve found the blog use­ful in your stud­ies or dis­cov­ered a new play, or if you have a play sug­ges­tion for the site, leave a com­ment.  Thanks.

The Bad Guys — Alena Smith

badguys

First per­formed on June 6, 2012 by the Sec­ond Stage Theatre.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Noah—a film­maker (31/32)                           James McMe­namin
Paul—a bar­tender (23)                                 Raviv Ull­man
Fink—a banker (31/32)                                 Michael Braun
Jesse—a drug dealer (31/32)                      Tobias Segal
Whit—a Marine (31/32)                                 Roe Har­trampf

Direc­tor:  Hal Brooks
Set Design:  Jason Simms
Cos­tume Design:  Jes­sica Pabst
Light­ing Design:  Seth Reiser
Sound Design:  Ryan Rumery
Stage Man­ager:  Kyle Gates

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Smith, Alena. The Bad Guys. Drama­tists Play Ser­vice, Inc., 2013. Drama Library Stacks PS3619. M537 B33 2013.

 

Set­ting:  A brick patio and the sur­round­ing lawn out­side a large house in upstate New York.  One after­noon in September.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

FINK

(furi­ous) He’s an igno­rant Podunk tweaker with A.D.D.!

Genre/Style:  Serio-comedic

Plot:   Noah has directed an inde­pen­dent film expos­ing child­hood secrets his friends and fam­ily would rather leave buried.  On the eve of his escape to LA, Noah, his step­brother, and two child­hood friends wres­tle with betray­als old and new.  The play explores the mean­ing of and the bonds—and limits—of male friendship.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.21–22:  Jesse blows up over the losses his fam­ily has sus­tained due to the burst­ing of the hous­ing bub­ble and rails against the gov­ern­ment bailout of big banks.

JESSE    

Fuck soci­ety. I’m talkin’ about my fam­ily. You know Fink was the one who kept telling my dad to build those shitty spec houses! Oh, everyone’s doing it. Easy money. Get in the game, Glen. ‘Cause houses aren’t for liv­ing in any­more. They’re for flip­pin! Like burg­ers. But then the big burger bub­ble blows up. [Lines cut] An appetizer—no, an appeteaser. That’s what they call it at Applebee’s, right? And you know what they call it at KFC. (Beat.) A Dou­ble Down. Yup. That’s what we did here, Amer­ica. We just dou­bled the fuck down on this bullshit.

p.35:  Whit recounts los­ing his best friend, a fel­low Marine, in the Iraqi war.

WHIT

He was my best friend. Kid from Con­cord, Mass.—on his third tour—supposed to go home in a month—and then he got shot. And he died. And when he died, I died too. (Beat.) And then I realized—things are dif­fer­ent when you’re dead. Things don’t hurt as much. [Lines cut] So, you know—if you want to ask me whether this is a good war—I hon­estly gotta tell you, I don’t know. But for me, while I was out there—that didn’t mat­ter. What mat­tered was that I was doing my job. Being a good Marine, tak­ing care of my guys. What mat­tered was that I was strong. So for me—this was a good war. And that’s about all I can say on the subject.

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes:  Scenes con­tain the first person’s lines and the last person’s lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the scene in its entirety.

p. 9–11:  Noah explains to Paul that he made his movie so that he could for­get about the past and escape from his child­hood home.  Starts with

NOAH

(Grudg­ing.) Okay, fine. We can have one beer. But then we have to get out of here. If my mother comes back, she’ll go into hys­ter­ics again. I don’t’ know how that woman is going to sur­vive with­out me.

and ends with

NOAH

Yeah, I’m work­ing on los­ing them.

p.25–27:  Fink explains that he and his friend Ash are soul­mates and how Noah betrayed their friend­ship by snitch­ing on Ash back when they were kids.  Fink doesn’t real­ize that Noah’s movie is about that very inci­dent; Paul tries to keep it from him.   Starts with

PAUL

[Right.] (Beat.) How come nobody ever found out Ash was there?

and ends with

FINK

(Laugh­ing.) So ridicu­lous! No—but I like that. Loy­alty. That’s good.

 

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Ish­er­wood, C. (2012, June 7). Boys being boys, with beers and guns. The New York Times, pp. 6.

Sta­sio, M. (2012, June 6). The bad guys. Daily Vari­ety, pp. 3.

Vincetelli, E.  (2012, June 5). Unex­pect­edly wise ‘guys’. The New York Post, pp. 32.

 

The Dark Things – Ursula Rani Sarma

busstop

First per­formed on Octo­ber 6, 2009 at the Tra­verse The­atre in Edinburgh.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Daniel (20s, artist)                           Brian Fer­gu­son
LJ (20s, for­mer exotic dancer)      Suzanne Don­ald­son
Steph (early 20s)                             Nicola Jo Cully
Gerry (late 50s, psy­chi­a­trist)         David Acton
Karl (late 20s)                                  Keith Flem­ing

Direc­tor:  Dominic Hill
Designer:  Neil Warm­ing­ton
Light­ing Designer:  Lizzie Pow­ell
Sound Designer:  John Har­ris
Stage Man­ager:  Gemma Smith

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Sarma, Ursula Rani. The Dark Things. Oberon Mod­ern Plays, 2009. Drama Library PR6119.A76 D37 2009.

Set­ting:  The play takes place in London.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

LJ

Tell that to my legs if you see them… maybe I’ll have them stuffed… put them on the liv­ing room wall beside the telly (DANIEL looks at her hor­ri­fied.) Jesus… relax… I’m only fuck­ing about… face of you… you’d swear they were your legs I was on about…

Genre/Style:  Drama

Plot:   Daniel is the only unin­jured sur­vivor of a bus crash in Lon­don.  LJ also sur­vived, but lost both legs in the acci­dent.  Daniel turns his expe­ri­ence into art, but suf­fers from sur­vivors’ guilt and is falling apart inside.  In his des­per­a­tion, he goes to Gerry, a psy­chi­a­trist who is see­ing things and deal­ing with his own issues about death and sur­vival.  Daniel’s half-sister, Steph, is try­ing to find her way in the world, but falls afoul of Karl, a some­what seedy older guy who’s just as lost.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.17–18:  Daniel recount­ing the moment of the explo­sion.  A very long mono­logue which can be edited down. 

DANIEL                

Dark­ness (Beat.) Total and com­plete dark­ness. (Beat.) Oceanic dark­ness. (Beat.) Like being at the bot­tom of a lake, on your back, stuck fast in the mud and sink­ing (Beat.) Try­ing to breathe, try­ing to decide if I am alive or dead, try telling myself it’s a dream and will myself to wake up and see… and see… my bed­side table… yel­low lamp… flo­ral sheets

[Lines cut]

The sound of bones break­ing is… inhu­man. I curl up… in a ball… pull my knees up duck my head down and pray… please God get me out of this… please God… Please fuck­ing God… I don’t care… I don’t care if every­one else is crushed to death and I’m…  I’m the only one left

p.107–108:  Steph, drunk, talks to Gerry who has come to a party Daniel is hold­ing before he kills him­self.  Steph has seen Karl and LJ leave together and is try­ing to make her­self feel good about her messed-up life and lack of con­nec­tions. Long mono­logue, can be edited.

STEPH

Oh… I remem­ber… sure (She siles, beat.) You still remind me of Danny’s dad though. You know Danny’s dad and my dad were dif­fer­ent peo­ple, but they both died, and then my mum met some­one else and then he died… so it’s like I had two d ads and Danny had three… and they all died… so I guess we kind of gave up on the idea of hav­ing a dad.

[Lines cut]

Why do peo­ple use peo­ple? Just to make them­selves feel bet­ter? Is that it? How can mak­ing     some­one feel like shit make you feel better?

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes: 

p. 19–23:  Daniel tries to deal with his half-sister Steph who has  been liv­ing with him, not work­ing, mak­ing a mess, and gen­er­ally being a pain in the ass.  He’s try­ing to get her to move out, but in the end, she man­ages to wran­gle a per­ma­nent invi­ta­tion out of him.  Starts with

STEPH

(Lis­ten­ing, then presses pause.) Today is the first day of the rest of my life. (Presses play lis­tens then presses pause.) Today is a gift and not a bur­den [Lines cut] did you get mugged by Jimmy Nail?

and ends with

STEPH

(Smiles.) Good… I’m glad (He exits, she looks about.) I am the cap­tain of my own ship of moti­va­tion (She picks up the paper.) I am. (She puts the paper down and picks up the remote con­trol.) I…

p.73–77:  Daniel is vis­it­ing LJ in her flat.  While LJ is try­ing to advance their one-sided rela­tion­ship and get him to move in with her, he tries to get her to let Steph move in with her.  Nei­ther one is really con­nect­ing with the other.   Starts with

LJ

I can see your build­ing from my bed­room win­dow, just the roof, can see pretty much every­thing from up here (Daniel nods, beat) and it’s quiet… a bit too quiet some­times… catch myself feel­ing lonely have to snap myself out of it…

and ends with

LJ

I know a place. (Beat.) I’ll show you. (Beat, Daniel goes to push her chair.) I can do it… I can do it on my own.

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Cooper, N.  (2009, Oct 12). Artist’s brush with death; sur­viv­ing a crash acts as one man’s wake-up call in a self-absorbed world; The­atre.  The Her­ald, pp. 18.

Fisher, M. (2009, Oct 16). Reviews:  The­atre:  The dark things tra­verse, edin­burgh 4/5. The Guardian,  pp.42.

McMil­lan, J. (2009, Oct 15). Joyce mcmil­lan on the­atre:  Integrity to fore as nts cel­e­brates one man and his music. The Scots­man, pp. 36.

Scot, R. D. (2009, Oct 14). The dark things; arts first night the­atre. The Times (Lon­don), pp. 16, 17.

McMil­lan, J. (2011, Aug 11). Review:  2401 objects/what remains. The Scots­man, pp. 13.

2401 Objects-Written by Hannah Barker, Lewis Hetherington & Liam Jarvis. Devised by Analogue.

hippocampusFirst per­formed at the Old­en­bur­gis­ches Staat­sthe­ater, Ger­many on June 17, 2011.  UK pre­miere was at Pleas­ance Court­yard, Edin­burgh on August 3, 2011.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Dr. Jacopo Annese/Henry Molai­son                       Sebastien Law­son
Patient HM/Father                                                     Pieter Law­man
Nurse/Lauren/Mother                                               Melody Grove

Direc­tors:  Liam Jarvis and Han­nah Barker
Set Designer:  Anike Sedello
Light­ing Designer:  Alexan­der Fleis­cher
Sound Designer:  Alexan­der Gar­fath
Mul­ti­me­dia Designer:  Thor Hay­ton
Stage Man­ager:  Helen Mugridge

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Barker, Han­nah.   2401 Objects.  Oberon Mod­ern Plays, 2011.  Drama Library PR6102.A76335 A615 2011.

 

Set­ting:  The play takes place in Hart­ford, Con­necti­cut, 1953; the Bick­ford Health Cen­tre, Con­necti­cut from 1988–2008; and at The Brain Obser­va­tory, San Diego, 2011.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

FATHER

No.  No Henry.  No.  Fine.  We’ll do noth­ing.  That’s right.  We’ll sit here and do noth­ing as we always do.  Sit here and do noth­ing and and just… Just qui­etly dis­ap­point each other for the rest of our lives.

Genre/Style:  Drama

Plot:   In 1953, Henry Molai­son, an epilep­tic, wakes up from an exper­i­men­tal surgery in which his hip­pocam­pus has been removed, with­out any rec­ol­lec­tion of the last two years of his life or the abil­ity to form new mem­o­ries.  In 2009, Dr. Jacopo Annese dis­sects his brain live on the inter­net and cuts it into 2401 slices.  The play explores his life before and after the surgery.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

The only char­ac­ter who has any mono­logues in 2401 Objects is Dr. Annese, who also plays Henry as a young man.

p.42–43:  Dr. Annese explain­ing how Dr. Scov­ille per­formed the exper­i­men­tal surgery on Henry.  Comes from a much longer mono­logue. 

DR. ANNESE

First he had to pull down the skin from Henry’s fore­head. Then, he uses a hole saw—the type you wind by hand—to cut through the skull.  Just above one of the eye sock­ets, he grinds through the bone and removes a disc of about three cen­time­ters in diam­e­ter. He repeats this pro­ce­dure above the other eye. Two holes. Now he can see the brain.

 [Lines cut]

He snaps a few tiny metal clips onto the frayed lesion to seal it, and then does as good a job as he can putting Henry’s head back as it was.   

p.60–61:  Dr. Annese explain­ing what the hip­pocampii do. Long mono­logue, can be edited.

DR. ANNESE

Your thumbs rest just on top of your ears, and the heel of your hand is sort of on your fore­head. There you’ve got the idea.

And you can feel bone case under­neath your hands.  And under that, your brain. [Lines cut] And about five cen­time­ters trav­el­ling straight in from where your thumbs are, is where your hip­pocampii live.

[Lines cut]

You see Henry, Patient HM. There is a mem­ory there. And then, that mem­ory, is gone.

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes: 

p. 24–27:  Henry meets Lau­ren, who lives next door and is home from col­lege for the sum­mer. Henry, because of his con­di­tion, can’t live on his own or work or go to school any­more. Starts with

LAUREN

Hello.

and ends with

HENRY

Yes. Yeah. Bye. Yes.

p.38–40:  HM is watch­ing To Have and Have Not in the hos­pi­tal when the Nurse arrives to see what he wants for break­fast.  Since HM can’t make new mem­o­ries, they con­tin­u­ally have the same exchanges over and over again through­out the scene.  Starts with

NURSE

Really?

and ends with

NURSE

That’s lovely. Now. I’ll get you your breakfast.

 

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Bar­nett, L. (2011, Aug 19). Sci­en­tific odyssey in mem­ory of an amne­siac. The Daily Tele­graph, pp. 32.

Hutera, D. (2011, July 29). The­atre. The Times (Lon­don), pp. 13.

Jones, A. (2011, Aug 25). Amnesiac’s story lingers in the mem­ory. Inde­pen­dent Extra, pp. 16.

McMil­lan, J. (2011, Aug 11). Review:  2401 objects/what remains. The Scots­man, pp. 13.

 

Aalst – Duncan McLean from original texts by Pol Heyvaert and Dimitri Verhulst

aalst

New Scot­tish ver­sion first per­formed at Tramway, Glas­gow, on Wednes­day March 21, 2007.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Cathy Delaney                 Kate Dickie
Michael Delaney
             David McKay
Voice (off­stage)                Gary Lewis

Direc­tor:  Pol Hey­vaert
Assis­tant Direc­tor:  David Over­rend
Sound Engi­neer:  Matthew Pad­den
Stage Man­ager:  Paul Claydon

Pub­li­ca­tion:  McLean, Dun­can. Aalst. Methuen Drama, 2007. Drama Library PR6063.A2486 A64 2007.

Set­ting:  The play is per­formed on a bare stage with the two actors seated in chairs with micro­phones in front of them.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

CATHY

He slapped me in the face, burnt me with cig­a­rettes, with a razor he… carved my legs up. And as well, in my pubic hair, he wrote the let­ter M.

Genre/Style:  Drama

Plot:   In Jan­u­ary 1999, a Bel­gian cou­ple checked into a motel with their two chil­dren, aged seven and three months.  A week later, the chil­dren were found dead in the room.  The three-month-old girl had been suf­fo­cated and the seven-year-old boy had been stabbed with a pair of scis­sors.  The par­ents were arrested and a Bel­gian judge sen­tenced them to life in prison.  The play, trans­planted to Scot­land, is a fic­tion­al­ized exam­i­na­tion of the par­ents, now named Cathy and Michael Delaney, which moves beyond the bare facts of the case in order to try to under­stand how two young peo­ple who appear to be, on the sur­face, non-violent losers could mur­der their own chil­dren. The play refuses to see them as vic­tims, despite their his­tory of child­hood abuse, but it doesn’t out­right con­demn them for their heinous actions.

 

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.26–27:  Cathy tells the Voice what hap­pened the night her son, Matthew, was killed.  Very long mono­logue, can be edited. 

CATHY

I went down­stairs for a packet of cig­a­rettes, and then I lay on the bed… I woke up. I heard noises in the street out­side— traf­fic, singing— and then I thought:  it’s true, I’m not at home, we’re in a hotel room.

[Lines cut]

My father always used to light a cig­a­rette just after he had come inside me. And I’d look at him, lying on his back, slowly blow­ing smoke at the ceil­ing. Smok­ing is a form of sigh­ing. I was twelve when I started smok­ing, and I smoked my first cig­a­rettes exactly like my dad did. I blew the smoke out just like him.

If our Matthew gets a bit older, he’ll end up a smoker too.’ That’s what I was think­ing then.

p.27–28:  Michael tries to explain why they killed their kids. Long mono­logue, can be edited.

MICHAEL

What were we sup­posed to do? Every par­ent wants the best for their kid. When I was a wee boy, my mother used to slap me in the face, and straight after she’d say, ‘That’s cos I love you.’ I’m telling you, every par­ent wants the best for their kid.

[Lines cut]

There aren’t many things I know for sure, but one thing I do know is: no one will ever put any of my kids in a home. Over my dead body.

What were we sup­posed to do? We wiped out our kids. Don’t tell me we didn’t want the best for them.

 

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes: 

p. 18–22:  The Voice inter­ro­gates Michael about the death of his infant daugh­ter, Ellie. Starts with

VOICE

Was she asleep, or was she cry­ing, or…?

and ends with

MICHAEL

Yes, and then I told her she was a child murderer!

p.46–48:  Cathy and Michael offer up last defenses for their actions.  Starts with

CATHY

I’ve been hurt too! It’s strange, isn’t it, sir, we were never taught any­thing about ‘life’ at school. Never. All you got was: ‘What’s the cap­i­tal of Peru?’

and ends with

CATHY

I would like to say that I miss my chil­dren very much and that I’m very sorry about what hap­pened. And that I wish I could turn the clock back, because what we did was not exactly brilliant.

 

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Brown, M. (2007, Mar 26). Stac­cato descent into mur­der. The Daily Tele­graph, pp. 029.

Cooper, N. (2007, Mar 26). The­atre aalst, tramway, gal­way 4/5. The Her­ald, pp. 18. R

Gard­ner, L. (2007, Mar 17). The guide: The­atre: Aalst glas­gow. The Guardian, pp. 39.

Gough, S. (2008, Feb 2). Mon­ster cou­ple a pro­found act. The Courier Mail (Aus­tralia), pp. 50.

Hal­lett, B. (2008, Jan 1). How to remake a killing; the­atre. Syd­ney Morn­ing Her­ald, pp. 27.

Har­row­ing look at human cru­elty. (2008, Jan 24). Can­berra Times, pp. 8.

Koenig, R. (2007, Apr 23). A mur­der mys­tery with­out moti­va­tion ; the­atre ++ AALST ++ soho the­atre LONDON. The Inde­pen­dent, pp. 1.

Mar­lowe, S. (2007, Apr 23). Aalst. The Times, pp. 17.

McMil­lan, J. (2007, Mar 30). The death of inno­cence:  Is there such a thing as out­right evil? This infan­ti­cide drama doesn’t pro­vide an answer, but it is cer­tainly a highly com­pelling way of ask­ing the ques­tion. The Scots­man, pp. 14.

Smith, G. (2007, Dec 21). Shed­ding light on dark crime:  Syd­ney fes­ti­val 2008. The Daily Tele­graph (Aus­tralia), pp.72.

Turpin, A. (2007, Mar 18). When the under­class kills chil­dren. The Sun­day Times, pp. 7.

Ditch – Beth Steel

ditch

Lon­don open­ing at The Old Vic Tun­nels on May 13, 2010.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Mrs. Peel (58-years old)            Dear­blha Mol­loy
Megan (20-years old)                 Matti Houghton
Burns (early 50s)                        Danny Webb
Bug (Late 30s)                            Paul Rat­tray
Turner (Late 30s)                       Craig Con­way
James (20-years old)                  Gethin Anthony

Direc­tor:  Richard Twyman
Design:  takis
Light­ing:  Matt Pren­tice
Sound:
  Christo­pher Shutt
Music:  Tom Mills

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Steel, Beth. Ditch. Methuen Drama, 2010. Drama Library PR6119. T437 S74 2010.

Set­ting:  The Peak Dis­trict (cen­tral and north­ern Eng­land); the future.

Lan­guage:  Some regional dialect and lingo

TURNER

They hole up in ‘em before makin’ their way just north a’ there to the Pen­nine Way, leads all the way up to the Scot­tish bor­der. Most a’ the time that’s where the cunts a’ headin’, Scotland.

Genre/Style:  Drama

Plot:   In the future, most of Britain is under­wa­ter; civ­i­liza­tion is on its last legs before a global war;  the British gov­ern­ment has become a fas­cist regime already at war in Venezuela; women’s repro­duc­tive  rights are non-existent; and bands of Secu­rity men patrol the coun­try­side look­ing for Illegals—mostly preg­nant women—since preg­nancy is illegal—who are try­ing to escape the coun­try. Against this back­drop, Megan and James meet at a rural out­post she helps an older woman main­tain for the men sta­tioned there.  Although the out­look for the future is bleak—and details about the present a bit murky in the script—the peo­ple of the out­post fight to restore some sem­blance of a soci­ety and con­nect with one another on a basic human level.  The play works best in those inti­mate moments between two peo­ple:  two sol­diers try­ing to plan a bet­ter future, two young lovers con­nect­ing for the first time, two older per­sons try­ing to find hap­pi­ness in a world gone mad.

 

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.40–41:  James tells Megan how he and his father used to attend protest meet­ings after things fell apart, but that grad­u­ally they stopped going for fear of Secu­rity men break­ing up the meet­ings;  and now, he’s Secu­rity, and he’s been break­ing up meet­ings like that. 

JAMES

Sat there lis­tenin’ mostly s’what I done.  Reminded me a’ when I used to go meetin’s with my dad. It been after the Break­down that. There’d be about fifty a’ us, standin’ or sit­tin’ in  pokey ter­race. I just been a kid, been there lis­tenin’.  [Lines cut] This past year I been the one who’s breakin’ up meetin’s… they still have ‘em in ter­races, but they younger who go to ‘em… aint been any less a’ ‘em each time we went back… I’m talkin’ again… shouldn’t get used to it.

p.41:  Megan tells James about the time Mrs. Peel planted rhubarb and made rhubarb juice out of it, and the les­son Megan learned about enjoy­ing things while they last and not cry­ing when they’re gone.

MEGAN

When I planted the rhubarb Mrs Peel told me she was gonna make a rhubarb juice with it when it was ready. I never had rhubarb juice before but she told me it’s like apple juice but bet­ter and I really like apple juice.  [Lines cut] Rhubarb’s gonna be ready next month and Mrs Peel promised me she gonna make juice with it. When it’s gone it’s gone. I know that now. I just have to enjoy it whilst its there.

p.91:  Megan recalls a time when Mrs. Peel killed and cooked a hare that still seemed to be alive. Short monologue.

MEGAN

There been a time when you and me were out here workin’, and you spot­ted a hair munchin’   away at your salad leaves. You snuck up behind and grabbed hold a’ it. [Lines cut] I couldn’t stop lookin’ at them chunks cause they were movin’. Jit­terin’, like they were cold or some­thing’. You put the heat on ‘em and I say to you: them chunks are still alive! You say: they dead they just don’t know it yet.

Beat.

I feel like I’m alive and I just don’t know it yet.

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes: 

p. 26–29:  Megan and James hang out in the sta­bles get­ting to know one another.  This is part of a longer scene and can be either length­ened or short­ened.  Burns’ and Megan’s and James’ lines near the end can be cut.  Starts with

MEGAN

How much schoolin’ you had?

[BURNS

(Off­stage.) James?

JAMES

I gotta go.

MEGAN

He’s just callin’ he aint comin’ here.

BURNS

(Off­stage.) James?]

and ends with

MEGAN

S’all same to me.

p.51–54:  James and Megan deal with the news that he’s being sent to the front in Argentina.  Starts with

JAMES

Dint know if you were gonna come.

and ends with

MEGAN

Ssshh. Want you to make love to me.

 

 

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Brown, G. (2010, May 30). No lights at the end of this tun­nel. Mail on Sun­day, pp. 23.

Clapp, S. (2010, May 23). Review:  Crit­ics:  The­atre:  A seri­ous exam­ple of tun­nel vision:  Life in post-apocalypse britain is being played out under water­loo sta­tion:  Ditch the old vic tun­nels , Lon­don SE1: Marine Parade The Old Mar­ket, Brighton. The Observer, pp. 39.

Gard­ner, L. (2010, Jun 2). Review:  The­atre:  Ditch old vic tun­nels, Lon­don 3/5. The Guardian, pp. 34.

Hart, C. (2010, May 23). The old vic’s ditch has a splen­didly gloomy set­ting, but the apoc­a­lyp­tic vision fails to thrill. The Sun­day Times, pp. 21.

Hem­ming, S. (2010, May 21). Ditch. Finan­cial Times, pp. 13.

Lukowski, A. (2010, May 27). The­atre:  Reviews:  Ditch. Time Out, pp. 116.

Mar­lowe, S. (2010, May 24). Ditch; The­atre. The Times, pp. 52.

Spencer, C. (2010, May 21). A chill­ing vision of the future. The Daily Tele­graph, pp. 33.

Tay­lor, P. (2010, May 28). The­atre:  Ditch old vic tun­nels, Lon­don. Inde­pen­dent Extra, pp. 16.

 

Decky Does a Bronco – Douglas Maxwell

Decky

The site-specific play was first per­formed at Brodie Park on July 28, 2000.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Decky (9-year-old boy)          David Ire­land
David (Adult)                          Keith Macpher­son
Young Chrissy                      Andy Clark
Adult Chrissy 
                       Craig Smith
Young Barry  
                        Ross Suther­land
Adult Barry
                            Paul Cun­ning­ham
Young O’Neil
                        Jimmy Har­ri­son
Adult O’Neil 
                          Muz Mur­ray

Note:  All parts are played by adult males.

Direc­tor:  Ben Har­ri­son
Sculptor/Set Designer:  Allan Ross
Cos­tume Design:  Alice Bee
Light­ing Design:  George Tar­buck
Com­poser:   Philip Pin­sky
Stunt Coor­di­na­tor:  Jonothan Camp­bell
Stage Man­ager:  Amy Shapcott

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Maxwell, Dou­glas. Decky Does a Bronco. Oberon Books, 2001. Drama Library PR6113. A85 D43 2001.

Set­ting:  A play­ground in the small town of Gir­van, on the west coast of Scotland.

 Lan­guage:  Con­tem­po­rary with lots of Scot­tish lingo

CHRISSY

And we’d still be tak­ing the mickey out of him. Just ’cause he’s—just ’cause he’s no here peo­ple are going to be all ‘Aw wee Decky was ace, man I was best pals with him’ but they wer­e­nae. I’m no even going to the funeral.

Genre/Style:  Serio-Comedic

Plot:   Adult David remem­bers the events of a sum­mer when he was nine and he and his friends hung out at the play­ground bron­co­ing swings and teas­ing Decky, the small­est of them who was never able to bronco.  David recounts the tragic event that shat­tered their inno­cent child­hoods and haunts them even as adults.  The play was orig­i­nally pro­duced on a play­ground and toured to play­grounds around Scotland.

 

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.  Since David is the nar­ra­tor in the play, he has a lot of monologues.

p.36–37:  David elu­ci­dates the dan­gers of satire, sar­casm, and irony. 

DAVID

Ah, happy, peace­ful days. I’m a patho­log­i­cal rem­i­nis­cer. I was rem­i­nisc­ing about lost days of youth when I was still a child, really. We’d some­times come up here and sit at the swings late at night after a com­mu­nity cen­ter teenage disco.  [Lines cut] I admit it, I enjoyed it. It was excit­ing. Things turned nasty when I needed to be sar­cas­tic first thing in the morn­ing. Then came irony. Before I knew it, I was lying alone in an empty ware­house on a stained mat­tress, main­lin­ing satire. Just say no.

p.53–54:  David tells what hap­pens when he and Chrissy went to Decky’s house the day Decky dis­ap­peared. Long mono­logue

DAVID

I remem­ber what hap­pened next very clearly. We walked along with Barry till we got to my bit. Barry pad­locked his bike to the inside of our fence and went in. Me and Chrissy walked on to Decky’s house, very, very slowly. [Lines cut] There was total silence in the liv­ing room, apart from Decky’s dad. He was sit­ting for­ward in his chair with his head in his hands. His hands were huge and bat­tered from years of work­ing out­side. The tears were stream­ing between his fin­gers as if his entire face was made from water.

p.62–63:  David explains what he does when he now sees a story on tele­vi­sion about a child hav­ing been abducted.  Very long mono­logue.

DAVID

You know when you watch the news and you see the daily child abduc­tion story; the smil­ing school photo in the cor­ner of the screen and the stern-faced news­reader, unable to believe that they are say­ing yet again the phrase ‘was last seen alive’; do you know when you see that, you always say ‘I can’t imag­ine what the par­ents are going through’, do you feel that you’re telling a lie?  [Lines cut] You see when the news comes on and I close my eyes, when every­one else is try­ing their hard­est not to see the truth, I have a pic­ture in my mind. It’s the most beau­ti­ful, free, child-like, fun, impor­tant thing in the world. Because it’s then, in that blink, in that instant…  Decky does a bronco.

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes:  This play has a lot of char­ac­ters and there are very few sec­tions that involve just two people.

p. 55–57:  Barry and David talk about Decky’s death.  Starts with

DAVID

What did my mum want?

and ends with

BARRY

I’m wait­ing till I get back to Gran’s, till I cry. I won­der if she knows? She never even met Decky though. Think about it. Think about all the peo­ple who never met him, who he would have met, the things he would have done. He never even Bron­coed a swing.

 

 

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

Clapp, S. (2000, Aug 13). Arts: EDINBURGH FESTIVAL:THEATRE: Child’s play for adults: When the emo­tions of a gang of boys are por­trayed by adults, the results are dis­turb­ing. The Observer, pp. 8.

Hal­libur­ton, R. (2001, Jun 22). More than child’s play. Evening Stan­dard, pp. 50.

Hick­ling, A. (2001, Jun 09). Reviews: The­atre: Swings and round­abouts in man­ches­ter: Decky does a bronco: Whit­worth park, man­ches­ter (3/5 stars). The Guardian, pp. 1.25.

Kingston, J. (2001, Jun 25). Decky does a bronco. The Times, pp. 2, 24.

McMil­lan, J. (2010, Jul 08). The­atre reviews: Life’s swings and round­abouts. The Scots­man, pp. 36.

Spencer, C. (2001, Jun 25). A haunt­ing look at the leap from inno­cence. The Daily Tele­graph, pp. 15.

 

Moonfleece – Philip Ridley

moonfleecePro­fes­sional world pre­miere at Rich Mix in Lon­don, Wednes­day, March 3, 2010.

Orig­i­nal Cast:

Link (15-year-old boy)              Reece Noi
Tommy (18-year-old boy)          Bradley Tay­lor
Gavin (17-year-old boy)            Ash­ley George
Cur­tis (18-year-old boy)            Sean Verey
Alex (18-year-old girl)                Krupa Pat­tani
Jez (17-year-old boy)                David Ames
Sarah (17-year-old girl)             Emily Plumtree
Nina (20-year-old woman)        Sian Robins-Grace
Zak (22-year-old man)               Beru Tessema
Wayne (21-year-old man)          Reeda Har­ris
Stacey (20-year-old woman)     Ali­cia Davies

Direc­tor:  David Mer­catali
Set and Light­ing Design:  William Reynolds
Cos­tume Design:
  Ellan Parry
Sound Design:   Ed Borg­nis
Stage Man­ager:  Heather Doole

Pub­li­ca­tion:  Rid­ley, Philip. Moon­fleece. Methuen Drama, 2010. Drama Library Stacks PR6068.I292 M66 2010.

Set­ting:  A derelict coun­cil flat on the top floor of a tower block in East Lon­don; the present.

Lan­guage:  Contemporary

NINA

Lis­ten, sweetie! I’ve just made my way up an Ever­est of Dog Turds to get here. I did that because I thought you wanted a séance.

Genre/Style:  Serio-Comedic

Plot:   Cur­tis, a young right-wing, British National Party (BNP) activist, arranges a séance because he has been see­ing the ghost of his brother, Jason, who sup­pos­edly died while explor­ing the Colom­bian jun­gle.  The polit­i­cal meets the per­sonal as Cur­tis con­fronts the truth about what really hap­pened to his brother and why.  Not every­thing in the play works:  some of the char­ac­ters feel super­flu­ous and you ques­tion whether such a group of peo­ple would ever inter­act with one another given the extremes they inhabit on the social-political spec­trum.  Since Moon­fleece was writ­ten for young the­atre prac­ti­tion­ers and the­ater­go­ers, there are many parts for col­lege age actors.  A pro­duc­tion of the play in the West Mid­lands was banned after it was sched­uled to run because some felt that the play’s themes of homo­pho­bia, fas­cism and the BNP were not “suit­able for a com­mu­nity setting”.

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mono­logues:  Mono­logues con­tain the first few lines and the last few lines; please con­sult the pub­lished text for the mono­logue in its entirety.

p.19–20:  Cur­tis explains to Link why the derelict flat will always be his place, even if Link cur­rently squats there. Long monologue.

CURTIS

Jesus Christ, ain’t you heard any­thing I’ve said, you bloody stu­pid—? Lis­ten! My gran was the first per­son to move into this tower block. They were still lay­ing cement. If you go to the base­ment there’s hand­prints in the floor. My gran’s.  [Lines cut] –Don’t you dare refer to this flat as yours! Hear me? Don’t dare! It’ll never be yours. It’ll never be anyone’s except mine. Even when they dyna­mite the place—and it’s noth­ing but rubble—the rub­ble that makes up this flat will have my name run­ning through it!

p.23–24:  Alex tells Cur­tis the rea­son Sarah stopped talk­ing to him was because they saw him at a fas­cist rally.

ALEX

No rea­son? You want the full essay or just the bul­let points? You lied! You’re full of hate! You preach hate! Your views stink! You’re a pig! You’ll breed pigs! You want me to carry on? [Lines cut] Then what hap­pens? A fam­ily day out with smi­ley grannies and tod­dlers chant­ing, ‘Eng­land for the white!’ I was stand­ing next to her when she heard you speak. Her world fell apart.

p.85–86:  Stacey talks about the trou­bles she encoun­tered try­ing to bury her sausage dog, Banger, and how Cur­tis’ step­fa­ther, Mr. Avalon, came to her aid. Long monologue.

STACEY

It’s like when my sausage dog died. I loved that sausage dog. Banger its name was. And one day I looked in its lit­tle bas­ket and Banger was as stiff as a board. I cried and cried. Dad wasn’t much help. He said we should use it as a draught excluder. I got no sym­pa­thy at all. [Lines cut] And that’s when this man comes out the shop next door. A white man! This man pays the lovely Pak­istani gen­tle­man the money I owe him and takes me into his own shop. And who’s answer­ing the phone? Wayne. Cos the man who paid for my drink was none other than Mr. Avalon. So you see, sweet­heart, if it weren’t for my dead Banger I’d never have met Wayne.

 

 

Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Scenes:  This play has a lot of char­ac­ters and no scene breaks but there are a few sec­tions of the play where only two peo­ple inter­act that could be done as a scene.

p. 17–20:  Link ques­tions Cur­tis about his fam­ily after learn­ing that Cur­tis and his fam­ily used to live in the flat Link now squats in with Zak.  Starts with

LINK

So … why’s ex-girlfriend Sarah com­ing here?

and ends with

CURTIS

Jesus Christ, ain’t you heard any­thing I’ve said, you bloody stu­pid—? Lis­ten! My gran was the first per­son to move into this tower block. They were still lay­ing cement. If you go to the base­ment there’s hand­prints in the floor. My gran’s.  [Lines cut] –Don’t you dare refer to this flat as yours! Hear me? Don’t dare! It’ll never be yours. It’ll never be anyone’s except mine. Even when they dyna­mite the place—and it’s noth­ing but rubble—the rub­ble that makes up this flat will have my name run­ning through it!

p.74–77:  Zak tells a frac­tured fairy­tale about Cur­tis’ brother, Jason, which exposes the truth about why Jason dis­ap­peared and later died.  A long scene. Starts with

ZAK

The King’s death sent the Queen mad. She started to bring wolves into the cas­tle. She cried, ‘My pre­cious wolves. They are all I need.’

and ends with

ZAK

 …‘Yes.’

 

 

Select Bib­li­og­ra­phy of Reviews and Crit­i­cism:  (Note:  arti­cle title links are to the online ver­sions, mostly UW-only restricted unless des­ig­nated as open access.)

All­free, C. (2010, Mar 09). Putting the BNP on stage. The Inde­pen­dent, pp. 14.

Akbar, A. (2010, Mar 30). Banned, the play that took on the BNP; Dud­ley coun­cil accused of cav­ing in to far right after pulling plug on ‘moon­fleece’. The Inde­pen­dent, pp. 2.

Blacker, T. (2010, Mar 31). Nobody has the right to be spared offence. The Inde­pen­dent, pp. 38.

Edgar, D. (2010, Apr 10). Com­ment: Panic and folly: A farce: The ban of moon­fleece is the lat­est exam­ple of an ill-founded cen­so­ri­ous atti­tude stalk­ing britain. The Guardian, pp. 36.

Iqbal, N. (2010, Mar 30). Mis­guided moon­fleece ban is an affront to the­atre. guardian.co.uk

Mar­lowe, S. (2010, Mar 05). Moon­fleece. The Times, pp. 68.

Mar­tin, D. (2010, Mar 04). Moon­fleece. [open access] The Stage.co.uk

Orr. J. (2010, Mar 08). Review:  Moon­fleece. [open access] A Younger Theatre.com

Philip rid­ley jmoves beyond shock tac­tics in moon­fleece. [open access] (2010, Mar 01) metro.co.uk

Tay­lor, P. (2010, Mar 04). Under the skin of the racists; The­atre moon­fleece rich mix, Lon­don. Inde­pen­dent Life, pp. 16.