Abajo Los Chinos:” Race and the Public Sphere in Revolutionary Mexico

Jason Chang
His­tory and Asian Amer­i­can Stud­ies
Uni­ver­sity of Connecticut

Wednes­day, Feb­ru­ary 19, 2014
4:00 pm
Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 120

Abajo Los Chi­nos”: Race and the Pub­lic Sphere in Rev­o­lu­tion­ary Mexico

When the Mex­i­can repub­lic erupted in rev­o­lu­tion in 1910, its com­pet­ing lead­ers often used the lan­guage of mes­tizo nation­al­ism to rally sup­port­ers. Ref­er­ences to a pop­ulist mes­tizo nation­al­ism ges­tured towards the emer­gence of the demo­c­ra­tic prin­ci­ples of a pub­lic sphere. His­to­ri­ans have attrib­uted the suc­cess of rev­o­lu­tion­ary Mex­i­can nation­al­ism to state ide­olo­gies of mes­ti­zaje and pop­ulist agrar­ian reforms. How­ever, the his­tory of Mexico’s anti-Chinese pol­i­tics reveals that racism has played an unap­pre­ci­ated role in the cre­ation of a pub­lic sphere in which the com­mon good of mes­ti­zos became think­able. In this lec­ture, Jason­Chang details the ways that racial vio­lence, anti-Chinese orga­ni­za­tions, and racist poli­cies con­tributed to the expan­sion of mes­tizo nation­al­ism. This revi­sion­ist his­tory high­lights the ways that race was an essen­tial tech­nol­ogy of state for­ma­tion that under­girded the trans­for­ma­tion of rule and con­sent after the revolution.

Com­bin­ing Asian Amer­i­can Stud­ies and Latin Amer­i­can Stud­ies, Jason Chang’s research focuses on the his­tory of Asian dias­po­ras in the Amer­i­cas and the dif­fer­ent sys­tems of race and gen­der they encounter and become a part of. These his­to­ries of migra­tion, set­tle­ment and racial­iza­tion are rep­re­sen­ta­tive of his inter­ests in the broader geo-historical for­ma­tions that have linked Asia and the Amer­i­cas since the six­teenth century.

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Cen­ter for the Study of the Pacific North­west, the Henry M. Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).

Recorded Lectures for B/ordering Violence Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas: The 2012–13 John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures

Maria Jose­fina Sal­dana 10/08/12
Fron­tier Lib­er­al­ism and the Geneal­ogy of Mexico’s indio bár­baro, 1810–1870 https://tegr.it/y/19cyz

Ali­cia Schmidt Cama­cho 10/25/2012
<a href=”” title=“Migrant Per­son­hood and the Def­i­n­i­tion of Sov­er­eign Power in”>

Robin Derby 11/29/12
Cuidado con el perro que muerde callado:
Black Dogs as Trauma Revenants on His­pan­iola
https://tegr.it/y/199xw

Juan Flo­res 11/30/2012
Salsa Power: The Pol­i­tics in/of Latin Music of the 1960s
https://tegr.it/y/199xq

Shan­non Speed 1/17/2013
Indige­nous Women Migrants and Human Rights in the Era of Neolib­eral Mul­ti­crim­i­nal­ism
https://tegr.it/y/199xk

Nicole Guidotti-Hernandez 2/7/2013
Yaqui Pro­files of Deporta­bil­ity, 1899–1912
https://tegr.it/y/199x2

William Ner­ic­cio 2/28/2013
“Con­fes­sions of a Mex­i­can Amer­i­can Hoarder” or “Prowl­ing the Cau­casian Bes­tiary”: The Exis­ten­tial and Insane Con­se­quences of Col­lect­ing Latina/o Arti­facts and Stereo­types
https://tegr.it/y/199x0

Audra Simp­son and Ofe­lia Zepeda 4/11/2013
Map­ping Sov­er­eignty: Indige­nous Bor­der­lands, Speak­ers: Audra Simp­son, Colum­bia Uni­ver­sity and Ofe­lia Zepeda, Uni­ver­sity of Ari­zona
https://tegr.it/y/199wy

Luis Vit­tor 5/2/2013
Com­mu­ni­ties Affected by Min­ing: The CONACAMI Case and its Impact on Latin Amer­ica
https://tegr.it/y/199ww
 

Kim Tall­bear, Noe­noe Silva, Jon… 5/23/2013
Bor­ders of Kin­ship: Species/Race/Indigeneity
https://tegr.it/y/1637h

Borders of Kinship: Species/Race/Indigeneity

Thurs­day, May 23, 2013
4:00pm
Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 120

https://tegr.it/y/1637h

Bring­ing the Land to the Fight: Biotech­nol­ogy and Hawai­ian Ontol­ogy
Noe­noe Silva (Polit­i­cal Sci­ence, Uni­ver­sity of Hawai’i, Manoa) and Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller (Social Sci­ences, Pub­lic Pol­icy Cen­ter, Uni­ver­sity of Hawai’i, Manoa) exam­ine cur­rent polit­i­cal strug­gles of native Hawai­ians over the increas­ing pres­ence of biotech­nol­ogy cor­po­ra­tions in Hawai’i. Biotech­nol­ogy depends upon con­di­tions that facil­i­tate genet­i­cally mod­i­fied organ­ism (GMO) research and profit from ever-increasing pro­duc­tion of genet­i­cally mod­i­fied organ­isms. Legal regimes of prop­erty rec­og­nize new organ­isms that can be con­trolled, sold, and exploited; anal­o­gously, mul­ti­cul­tur­al­ist poli­cies recre­ate iden­tity through denial of indi­gene­ity, refus­ing land claims by indige­nous peo­ple that would inter­fere with biotech­nol­ogy indus­tries. This impacts Hawai­ians’ abil­ity to sur­vive on the land and to (re)create a Hawai­ian world, which would include native species, many of them kino lau or native deities. We con­sider Hawai­ian ideas of kalo, for exam­ple, as kin and sacred anc!  estor, and other plants, ani­mals, and nat­ural ele­ments as kino lau or body forms of deities, as cru­cial ele­ments in the strug­gle against fur­ther col­o­niza­tion and towards a resur­gence of native lifeways.

Indige­nous Approaches to Crit­i­cal Ani­mal Stud­ies and the New Mate­ri­alisms?
Kim­berly Tall­bear (Envi­ron­men­tal Sci­ences, Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley) high­lights what indige­nous thought has to offer aca­d­e­mic the­o­riz­ing as new crit­i­cal fields work to dis­man­tle hier­ar­chies in the rela­tion­ships of “west­ern­ers” with their non-human oth­ers. For exam­ple, “multi-species ethnog­ra­phy” now stud­ies humans and their rela­tions with nonhuman-beings such as dogs, bears, cat­tle, mon­keys, bees, mush­rooms, and microor­gan­isms. But the start­ing points of these inquiries can only par­tially con­tain indige­nous stand­points. Indige­nous peo­ples never for­got that non­hu­mans are agen­tial beings engaged in social rela­tions that pro­foundly shape human lives. More­over, their non-human oth­ers may not even be under­stood as liv­ing. “Objects” and “forces” such as stones, thun­der, or stars are known within our ontolo­gies to be sen­tient and know­ing per­sons. Indige­nous approaches also cri­tique set­tler colo­nial­ism and its man­age­ment of non-human oth­ers, link­ing vio­lenc!  e against ani­mals to vio­lence against par­tic­u­lar humans his­tor­i­cally accorded less-than-human or ani­mal status.

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com.

Symposium: Empires of Capital: Race Across the Atlantic and the Pacific, May 17–18

May 17 and 18, 2013
Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton, Seattle

The two-day sym­po­sium seeks to the­o­rize and his­tori­cize racial cap­i­tal­ism in the mod­ern world. Build­ing on Cedric Robinson’s insight that cap­i­tal­ist devel­op­ment has been pur­sued and orga­nized fun­da­men­tally around race, speak­ers will strive to uncover the mul­ti­ple lay­ers of cap­i­tal­ist expansion—ideological, cul­tural, eco­nomic, and social—to reveal and com­pre­hend the ten­sions and con­tra­dic­tions of racial cap­i­tal­ism in the past and in the present and across the Atlantic and the Pacific.

Fri­day, May 17
Petersen Room, Allen Library
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Open­ing Round­table
Lisa Lowe, Tufts Uni­ver­sity, “Sugar, Tea, Opium, Coolies: The Inti­ma­cies of Four Con­ti­nents”
Com­men­ta­tors: Moon-Ho Jung, Chan­dan Reddy, Stephanie Small­wood, and Alys Wein­baum (Con­fer­ence Organizers)

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.          Ses­sion 1
Jen­nifer Mor­gan, New York Uni­ver­sity, “Par­tus Sequitur Ven­trem: Slave Law and the His­tory of Women in Slav­ery”
Michael Wit­gen, Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan, “See­ing Red: The Pol­i­tics of Crime and Pun­ish­ment on the North­ern Bor­der­lands of the Early Amer­i­can Republic”

Sat­ur­day, May 18
Husky Union Build­ing, Room 334
10:30 a.m. – Noon      Ses­sion 2
Shel­ley Streeby, Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, San Diego, “Hubert H. Harrison’s Scrap­books, Racial Cap­i­tal­ism, and the Black Rad­i­cal Tra­di­tion”
Manu Vimalassery, Texas Tech Uni­ver­sity, “Native and Black Visions of Self-Determination”

Noon – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Break*

1:30 – 3:30 p.m.          Ses­sion 3
Peter James Hud­son, Van­der­bilt Uni­ver­sity, “Black Sov­er­eignty and Racial Cap­i­tal­ism: The National City Bank in Haiti and Liberia, 1910–1935”
Jodi Kim, Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, River­side, “Debt Impe­ri­al­ism, Set­tler Moder­nity, and the Necrop­ol­i­tics of the Promise”
Andrew Fried­man, Haver­ford Col­lege, “Merid­i­ans and Par­al­lels: Racial For­ma­tions on the Global Grid”

3:45 – 4:15 p.m.          Clos­ing Reflections

The sym­po­sium is free and open to the public.

*If you will be join­ing us for a light lunch on Sat­ur­day, please RSVP to cspn@uw.edu or 206–543-8656 by Tues­day, May 14.

Spon­sored by the Cen­ter for the Study of the Pacific North­west, the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton Libraries, the Depart­ment of His­tory, the Depart­ment of Eng­lish, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, and the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Humanities.

Communities Affected by Mining: The CONACAMI Case and its Impact on Latin America

Thurs­day, May 2, 2013
4:00 pm
Com­mu­ni­ca­tion 120

Comu­nidades afec­tadas por la min­ería: el caso CONACAMI y su impacto en América
In Novem­ber 1998, com­mu­nity lead­ers from the Peru­vian Andes came together in a sem­i­nar to dis­cuss the effects of min­ing in their com­mu­ni­ties. This could have sim­ply been one more meet­ing, but the con­clu­sions and agree­ments of this his­toric gath­er­ing opened a new chap­ter in the long strug­gle of Andean com­mu­ni­ties to defend their rights against the min­ing indus­try and state min­ing poli­cies. This new stage is marked by the lead­er­ship of the National Con­fed­er­a­tion of Com­mu­ni­ties Affected by Min­ing in Peru (Con­fed­eración Nacional de Comu­nidades del Perú Afec­tadas por la Min­ería – CONACAMI) and the emer­gence of a move­ment to denounce the neg­a­tive impacts of min­ing and orga­nize oppo­si­tion to it. This move­ment is con­sid­ered one of the iconic artic­u­la­tions of resis­tance to min­ing in Latin Amer­ica. Its most impor­tant con­tri­bu­tion is gen­er­at­ing a pub­lic debate over the impacts and ben­e­fits of mining.

Luis Vit­tor is a Peru­vian econ­o­mist and adviser to the Coor­di­nadora And­ina de Orga­ni­za­ciones Indí­ge­nas (Andean Coor­di­na­tor of Indige­nous Orga­ni­za­tions). He has also advised the Con­fed­eración de Comu­nidades del Perú Afec­tadas por la Min­ería (CONACAMI, the Con­fed­er­a­tion of Peru­vian Com­mu­ni­ties Affected by Min­ing) since its found­ing. He is of Quechua ori­gin and was born in Cerro de Pasco, Peru. From 2008–2009 he was a Fel­low in the Indige­nous Peo­ples, Human Rights, Gov­er­nance & Inter­na­tional Coop­er­a­tion pro­gram at the Uni­ver­sity Car­los III of Madrid (Spain). He is the author of Resisten­cias comu­ni­tarias a la min­ería: la expe­ri­en­cia de CONACAMI (Com­mu­nity Resis­tance to Min­ing: the CONACAMI expe­ri­ence) (2008) among numer­ous other pub­li­ca­tions.
Pre­sen­ta­tion will be in Span­ish with Eng­lish trans­la­tion by José Anto­nio Lucero (Latin Amer­i­can and Caribbean Studies).

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com.

Borderlands Graduate Student Coffee hour with Profs. Simpson and Zepeda

Fri­day April 12, 2013
10:00 am
Loca­tion: Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 206

Con­tact:  lasuw@uw.edu or 206.685.3435

Bor­der­lands Grad­u­ate Stu­dent Cof­fee hour with Audra Simp­son and Ofe­lia Zepeda. Come meet Profs. Simp­son and Zepeda for an infor­mal chat with other grad­u­ate stu­dents inter­ested in bor­der­lands research.

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Henry M. Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).

For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com

Mapping Sovereignty: Indigenous Borderlands

Thurs­day, April 11, 2013
4:00 pm, recep­tion to fol­low
Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 120
Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton, Seat­tle Campus

Audra Simp­son (Anthro­pol­ogy, Colum­bia Uni­ver­sity) “Indian Ter­ri­tory, the Racial­ized Life of Treaty and Set­tler Sovereignty”

Hau­denosaunee – or “The Iro­quois” – are an Indige­nous Con­fed­er­acy of Six Nations that inter­rupt the nar­ra­tives that attempts to explain them as well as the states that pur­port to law­fully own and admin­is­ter their land. Nowhere is this made clearer than in Iro­quois inter­pre­ta­tions of the Jay Treaty of 1794 and Iro­quois move­ment across the US-Canada border—an inter­na­tional bor­der that cuts through their his­tor­i­cal and con­tem­po­rary ter­ri­tory and is, sim­ply, in their space and in their way. It is through their actions, and in par­tic­u­lar, their mobil­ity on their own terms, that Indige­nous bor­der crossers enact their under­stand­ings of his­tory and law, under­stand­ings that are then received in par­tic­u­lar ways – racial­iz­ing, crim­i­nal­iz­ing, and delim­it­ing. Nonethe­less, Hau­denosaunee push against all of this as they move across var­i­ous bor­ders: ter­ri­to­r­ial, tem­po­ral and juridi­cal, in their active rela­tion­ships to land and to each other.  Audra Simp­son explores the his­tor­ica! l, legal, polit­i­cal and ethno­graphic life of Iro­quois nation­hood across bor­ders, and con­tends that their con­tin­ued life and action calls into deep ques­tion the con­ceit of ter­ri­to­r­ial cer­tainty and set­tler sov­er­eignty itself.

Ofe­lia Zepeda (Amer­i­can Indian Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Ari­zona) “The Tohono O’odham and the Bor­der: A Per­sonal Perspective”

Ofe­lia Zepeda is a mem­ber of the Tohono O’odham Nation. She con­tends, “Early on we were not really aware of an inter­na­tional bor­der since move­ment between the U.S. and Mex­ico was fairly free, espe­cially for the Tohono O’odham. The under­stand­ing of a polit­i­cal bor­der is some­thing fairly recent and does not come into play when one moves with fam­ily and kin back and forth in this desert space, where the polit­i­cal bor­der is sit­u­ated is all one great exten­sion of a people’s home, cul­ture, lan­guage and land. This in a sense is my per­spec­tive as a mem­ber of the O’odham Nation. But, things have changed.” In her talk, she shares her per­sonal per­spec­tive, mov­ing back and forth from the time before the true real­iza­tion of a bor­der and today when things are mag­ni­fied by the bor­der.
Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and  www.borderingviolence.com.

 

Seattle Fandango Project workshop

Sat­ur­day, March 2
12:30–2:30pm
El Cen­tro de la Raza
2425 16th Ave S
Seat­tle, WA 98144

What is Fan­dango / Que es el Fandango

Fan­dango jaro­cho is a four-hundred-year-old tra­di­tion from Ver­acruz, Mex­ico born from the encounter between Euro­pean, Indige­nous, African, and Arab cul­tures. After being can­on­ized by the Mex­i­can gov­ern­ment, El Nuevo Movimiento Jaranero reclaimed the musi­cal cel­e­bra­tion of fan­dango in the 1970’s as a space for com­mu­nity trans­for­ma­tion and empow­er­ment. Over the last twenty years, Chi­cano and Mex­i­can com­mu­ni­ties in the U.S. have engaged with com­mu­ni­ties in Ver­acruz to use fan­dango as a tech­nol­ogy for com­mu­nity build­ing and social jus­tice that tran­scends national borders.

The Seat­tle Fan­dango Project joins this move­ment by using the fan­dango to build and trans­form com­mu­nity. As a tech­nol­ogy (in the ana­log), fan­dango con­tains pro­to­cols within dance, music, verse, and par­tic­i­pa­tion that pro­vide new chan­nels of com­mu­ni­ca­tion, con­nec­tion, and under­stand­ing. Peo­ple find them­selves through musi­cal inter­ac­tion with oth­ers, and both indi­vid­u­ally and com­mu­nally real­ize new pos­si­bil­i­ties and ways of being. This is con­viven­cia, to con­vene and coex­ist. Once peo­ple leave fan­dango, this new sense of self car­ries over to other parts of their lives.

 

Dialogues of Resistance and Healing” with Quetzal Flores, Martha Gonzalez, and Kali Niño

Fri­day, March 1
6:00pm
Union Cul­ture Cen­ter
803 S. King St. Seat­tle, Wa 98104. Cor­ner of S. King St. + 8 Ave. S., Inter­na­tional District

Please join the Seat­tle Fan­dango Project and Union Cul­tural Cen­ter in a con­ver­sa­tion about com­mu­nity music as a site of resis­tance and heal­ing. Potluck style This event is free and all ages. Dona­tions grate­fully accepted.

Fea­tur­ing scholar and dancer, Raquel Rivera; Chican@ Artivist@s Martha Gon­za­lez (who is also a doc­toral can­di­date in Fem­i­nist Stud­ies at UW) and Quet­zal Flo­res of the Grammy award win­ning East L.A. band, Quet­zal; and Kali Niño, fan­dan­guera of Toronto and San Andres Tuxt­las and mem­ber of Cafe con Pan.