About mjj22

Current research project The Multi Dimensions of Blackness: Cultural Hegemony in the US and Abroad I am interested in how the concept of race and identity plays a role in how we perceive difference. Moreover, I would like to investigate how colonial powers such as the United States have shaped ideas of race and identity while maintaining colonial rule abroad. This past summer (2012) I was a participant in the Summer Institute in the Art & Humanities. This opportunity allowed me to explore questions concerning race and representation. Why were my peers studying abroad and returning with the same preconceived notions of developing countries? Why were my college classmates representing people and places in the Global South as underdeveloped, religious radicals, uneducated, disease stricken, and confrontational? These questions have driven my interest in globalization, power, borders, and how a variety of people and institutions located in "the West" represent the Global South.

Borders of Kinship: Species/Race/Indigeneity

Thurs­day, May 23, 2013
4:00pm
Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 120

https://tegr.it/y/1637h

Bring­ing the Land to the Fight: Biotech­nol­ogy and Hawai­ian Ontol­ogy
Noe­noe Silva (Polit­i­cal Sci­ence, Uni­ver­sity of Hawai’i, Manoa) and Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller (Social Sci­ences, Pub­lic Pol­icy Cen­ter, Uni­ver­sity of Hawai’i, Manoa) exam­ine cur­rent polit­i­cal strug­gles of native Hawai­ians over the increas­ing pres­ence of biotech­nol­ogy cor­po­ra­tions in Hawai’i. Biotech­nol­ogy depends upon con­di­tions that facil­i­tate genet­i­cally mod­i­fied organ­ism (GMO) research and profit from ever-increasing pro­duc­tion of genet­i­cally mod­i­fied organ­isms. Legal regimes of prop­erty rec­og­nize new organ­isms that can be con­trolled, sold, and exploited; anal­o­gously, mul­ti­cul­tur­al­ist poli­cies recre­ate iden­tity through denial of indi­gene­ity, refus­ing land claims by indige­nous peo­ple that would inter­fere with biotech­nol­ogy indus­tries. This impacts Hawai­ians’ abil­ity to sur­vive on the land and to (re)create a Hawai­ian world, which would include native species, many of them kino lau or native deities. We con­sider Hawai­ian ideas of kalo, for exam­ple, as kin and sacred anc!  estor, and other plants, ani­mals, and nat­ural ele­ments as kino lau or body forms of deities, as cru­cial ele­ments in the strug­gle against fur­ther col­o­niza­tion and towards a resur­gence of native lifeways.

Indige­nous Approaches to Crit­i­cal Ani­mal Stud­ies and the New Mate­ri­alisms?
Kim­berly Tall­bear (Envi­ron­men­tal Sci­ences, Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, Berke­ley) high­lights what indige­nous thought has to offer aca­d­e­mic the­o­riz­ing as new crit­i­cal fields work to dis­man­tle hier­ar­chies in the rela­tion­ships of “west­ern­ers” with their non-human oth­ers. For exam­ple, “multi-species ethnog­ra­phy” now stud­ies humans and their rela­tions with nonhuman-beings such as dogs, bears, cat­tle, mon­keys, bees, mush­rooms, and microor­gan­isms. But the start­ing points of these inquiries can only par­tially con­tain indige­nous stand­points. Indige­nous peo­ples never for­got that non­hu­mans are agen­tial beings engaged in social rela­tions that pro­foundly shape human lives. More­over, their non-human oth­ers may not even be under­stood as liv­ing. “Objects” and “forces” such as stones, thun­der, or stars are known within our ontolo­gies to be sen­tient and know­ing per­sons. Indige­nous approaches also cri­tique set­tler colo­nial­ism and its man­age­ment of non-human oth­ers, link­ing vio­lenc!  e against ani­mals to vio­lence against par­tic­u­lar humans his­tor­i­cally accorded less-than-human or ani­mal status.

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com.

Symposium: Empires of Capital: Race Across the Atlantic and the Pacific, May 17–18

May 17 and 18, 2013
Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton, Seattle

The two-day sym­po­sium seeks to the­o­rize and his­tori­cize racial cap­i­tal­ism in the mod­ern world. Build­ing on Cedric Robinson’s insight that cap­i­tal­ist devel­op­ment has been pur­sued and orga­nized fun­da­men­tally around race, speak­ers will strive to uncover the mul­ti­ple lay­ers of cap­i­tal­ist expansion—ideological, cul­tural, eco­nomic, and social—to reveal and com­pre­hend the ten­sions and con­tra­dic­tions of racial cap­i­tal­ism in the past and in the present and across the Atlantic and the Pacific.

Fri­day, May 17
Petersen Room, Allen Library
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Open­ing Round­table
Lisa Lowe, Tufts Uni­ver­sity, “Sugar, Tea, Opium, Coolies: The Inti­ma­cies of Four Con­ti­nents”
Com­men­ta­tors: Moon-Ho Jung, Chan­dan Reddy, Stephanie Small­wood, and Alys Wein­baum (Con­fer­ence Organizers)

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.          Ses­sion 1
Jen­nifer Mor­gan, New York Uni­ver­sity, “Par­tus Sequitur Ven­trem: Slave Law and the His­tory of Women in Slav­ery”
Michael Wit­gen, Uni­ver­sity of Michi­gan, “See­ing Red: The Pol­i­tics of Crime and Pun­ish­ment on the North­ern Bor­der­lands of the Early Amer­i­can Republic”

Sat­ur­day, May 18
Husky Union Build­ing, Room 334
10:30 a.m. – Noon      Ses­sion 2
Shel­ley Streeby, Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, San Diego, “Hubert H. Harrison’s Scrap­books, Racial Cap­i­tal­ism, and the Black Rad­i­cal Tra­di­tion”
Manu Vimalassery, Texas Tech Uni­ver­sity, “Native and Black Visions of Self-Determination”

Noon – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Break*

1:30 – 3:30 p.m.          Ses­sion 3
Peter James Hud­son, Van­der­bilt Uni­ver­sity, “Black Sov­er­eignty and Racial Cap­i­tal­ism: The National City Bank in Haiti and Liberia, 1910–1935”
Jodi Kim, Uni­ver­sity of Cal­i­for­nia, River­side, “Debt Impe­ri­al­ism, Set­tler Moder­nity, and the Necrop­ol­i­tics of the Promise”
Andrew Fried­man, Haver­ford Col­lege, “Merid­i­ans and Par­al­lels: Racial For­ma­tions on the Global Grid”

3:45 – 4:15 p.m.          Clos­ing Reflections

The sym­po­sium is free and open to the public.

*If you will be join­ing us for a light lunch on Sat­ur­day, please RSVP to cspn@uw.edu or 206–543-8656 by Tues­day, May 14.

Spon­sored by the Cen­ter for the Study of the Pacific North­west, the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton Libraries, the Depart­ment of His­tory, the Depart­ment of Eng­lish, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, and the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Humanities.

Communities Affected by Mining: The CONACAMI Case and its Impact on Latin America

Thurs­day, May 2, 2013
4:00 pm
Com­mu­ni­ca­tion 120

Comu­nidades afec­tadas por la min­ería: el caso CONACAMI y su impacto en América
In Novem­ber 1998, com­mu­nity lead­ers from the Peru­vian Andes came together in a sem­i­nar to dis­cuss the effects of min­ing in their com­mu­ni­ties. This could have sim­ply been one more meet­ing, but the con­clu­sions and agree­ments of this his­toric gath­er­ing opened a new chap­ter in the long strug­gle of Andean com­mu­ni­ties to defend their rights against the min­ing indus­try and state min­ing poli­cies. This new stage is marked by the lead­er­ship of the National Con­fed­er­a­tion of Com­mu­ni­ties Affected by Min­ing in Peru (Con­fed­eración Nacional de Comu­nidades del Perú Afec­tadas por la Min­ería – CONACAMI) and the emer­gence of a move­ment to denounce the neg­a­tive impacts of min­ing and orga­nize oppo­si­tion to it. This move­ment is con­sid­ered one of the iconic artic­u­la­tions of resis­tance to min­ing in Latin Amer­ica. Its most impor­tant con­tri­bu­tion is gen­er­at­ing a pub­lic debate over the impacts and ben­e­fits of mining.

Luis Vit­tor is a Peru­vian econ­o­mist and adviser to the Coor­di­nadora And­ina de Orga­ni­za­ciones Indí­ge­nas (Andean Coor­di­na­tor of Indige­nous Orga­ni­za­tions). He has also advised the Con­fed­eración de Comu­nidades del Perú Afec­tadas por la Min­ería (CONACAMI, the Con­fed­er­a­tion of Peru­vian Com­mu­ni­ties Affected by Min­ing) since its found­ing. He is of Quechua ori­gin and was born in Cerro de Pasco, Peru. From 2008–2009 he was a Fel­low in the Indige­nous Peo­ples, Human Rights, Gov­er­nance & Inter­na­tional Coop­er­a­tion pro­gram at the Uni­ver­sity Car­los III of Madrid (Spain). He is the author of Resisten­cias comu­ni­tarias a la min­ería: la expe­ri­en­cia de CONACAMI (Com­mu­nity Resis­tance to Min­ing: the CONACAMI expe­ri­ence) (2008) among numer­ous other pub­li­ca­tions.
Pre­sen­ta­tion will be in Span­ish with Eng­lish trans­la­tion by José Anto­nio Lucero (Latin Amer­i­can and Caribbean Studies).

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com.

Borderlands Graduate Student Coffee hour with Profs. Simpson and Zepeda

Fri­day April 12, 2013
10:00 am
Loca­tion: Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 206

Con­tact:  lasuw@uw.edu or 206.685.3435

Bor­der­lands Grad­u­ate Stu­dent Cof­fee hour with Audra Simp­son and Ofe­lia Zepeda. Come meet Profs. Simp­son and Zepeda for an infor­mal chat with other grad­u­ate stu­dents inter­ested in bor­der­lands research.

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Henry M. Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).

For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com

Mapping Sovereignty: Indigenous Borderlands

Thurs­day, April 11, 2013
4:00 pm, recep­tion to fol­low
Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 120
Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton, Seat­tle Campus

Audra Simp­son (Anthro­pol­ogy, Colum­bia Uni­ver­sity) “Indian Ter­ri­tory, the Racial­ized Life of Treaty and Set­tler Sovereignty”

Hau­denosaunee – or “The Iro­quois” – are an Indige­nous Con­fed­er­acy of Six Nations that inter­rupt the nar­ra­tives that attempts to explain them as well as the states that pur­port to law­fully own and admin­is­ter their land. Nowhere is this made clearer than in Iro­quois inter­pre­ta­tions of the Jay Treaty of 1794 and Iro­quois move­ment across the US-Canada border—an inter­na­tional bor­der that cuts through their his­tor­i­cal and con­tem­po­rary ter­ri­tory and is, sim­ply, in their space and in their way. It is through their actions, and in par­tic­u­lar, their mobil­ity on their own terms, that Indige­nous bor­der crossers enact their under­stand­ings of his­tory and law, under­stand­ings that are then received in par­tic­u­lar ways – racial­iz­ing, crim­i­nal­iz­ing, and delim­it­ing. Nonethe­less, Hau­denosaunee push against all of this as they move across var­i­ous bor­ders: ter­ri­to­r­ial, tem­po­ral and juridi­cal, in their active rela­tion­ships to land and to each other.  Audra Simp­son explores the his­tor­ica! l, legal, polit­i­cal and ethno­graphic life of Iro­quois nation­hood across bor­ders, and con­tends that their con­tin­ued life and action calls into deep ques­tion the con­ceit of ter­ri­to­r­ial cer­tainty and set­tler sov­er­eignty itself.

Ofe­lia Zepeda (Amer­i­can Indian Stud­ies, Uni­ver­sity of Ari­zona) “The Tohono O’odham and the Bor­der: A Per­sonal Perspective”

Ofe­lia Zepeda is a mem­ber of the Tohono O’odham Nation. She con­tends, “Early on we were not really aware of an inter­na­tional bor­der since move­ment between the U.S. and Mex­ico was fairly free, espe­cially for the Tohono O’odham. The under­stand­ing of a polit­i­cal bor­der is some­thing fairly recent and does not come into play when one moves with fam­ily and kin back and forth in this desert space, where the polit­i­cal bor­der is sit­u­ated is all one great exten­sion of a people’s home, cul­ture, lan­guage and land. This in a sense is my per­spec­tive as a mem­ber of the O’odham Nation. But, things have changed.” In her talk, she shares her per­sonal per­spec­tive, mov­ing back and forth from the time before the true real­iza­tion of a bor­der and today when things are mag­ni­fied by the bor­der.
Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and  www.borderingviolence.com.

 

Seattle Fandango Project workshop

Sat­ur­day, March 2
12:30–2:30pm
El Cen­tro de la Raza
2425 16th Ave S
Seat­tle, WA 98144

What is Fan­dango / Que es el Fandango

Fan­dango jaro­cho is a four-hundred-year-old tra­di­tion from Ver­acruz, Mex­ico born from the encounter between Euro­pean, Indige­nous, African, and Arab cul­tures. After being can­on­ized by the Mex­i­can gov­ern­ment, El Nuevo Movimiento Jaranero reclaimed the musi­cal cel­e­bra­tion of fan­dango in the 1970’s as a space for com­mu­nity trans­for­ma­tion and empow­er­ment. Over the last twenty years, Chi­cano and Mex­i­can com­mu­ni­ties in the U.S. have engaged with com­mu­ni­ties in Ver­acruz to use fan­dango as a tech­nol­ogy for com­mu­nity build­ing and social jus­tice that tran­scends national borders.

The Seat­tle Fan­dango Project joins this move­ment by using the fan­dango to build and trans­form com­mu­nity. As a tech­nol­ogy (in the ana­log), fan­dango con­tains pro­to­cols within dance, music, verse, and par­tic­i­pa­tion that pro­vide new chan­nels of com­mu­ni­ca­tion, con­nec­tion, and under­stand­ing. Peo­ple find them­selves through musi­cal inter­ac­tion with oth­ers, and both indi­vid­u­ally and com­mu­nally real­ize new pos­si­bil­i­ties and ways of being. This is con­viven­cia, to con­vene and coex­ist. Once peo­ple leave fan­dango, this new sense of self car­ries over to other parts of their lives.

 

Dialogues of Resistance and Healing” with Quetzal Flores, Martha Gonzalez, and Kali Niño

Fri­day, March 1
6:00pm
Union Cul­ture Cen­ter
803 S. King St. Seat­tle, Wa 98104. Cor­ner of S. King St. + 8 Ave. S., Inter­na­tional District

Please join the Seat­tle Fan­dango Project and Union Cul­tural Cen­ter in a con­ver­sa­tion about com­mu­nity music as a site of resis­tance and heal­ing. Potluck style This event is free and all ages. Dona­tions grate­fully accepted.

Fea­tur­ing scholar and dancer, Raquel Rivera; Chican@ Artivist@s Martha Gon­za­lez (who is also a doc­toral can­di­date in Fem­i­nist Stud­ies at UW) and Quet­zal Flo­res of the Grammy award win­ning East L.A. band, Quet­zal; and Kali Niño, fan­dan­guera of Toronto and San Andres Tuxt­las and mem­ber of Cafe con Pan.

Confessions of a Mexican American Hoarder” or “Prowling the Caucasian Bestiary”: The Existential and Insane Consequences of Collecting Latina/o Artifacts and Stereotypes

William Ner­ic­cio
Eng­lish & Com­par­a­tive Lit­er­a­ture, and Chi­cana & Chi­cano Stud­ies San Diego State University

Thurs­day, Feb­ru­ary 28, 2013
4:00 pm
Com­mu­ni­ca­tions 120

What hap­pens to the mind of a rel­a­tively sane Mex­i­can Amer­i­can aca­d­e­mic when doused with the deri­sive laugh­ter of an East Coast under­grad­u­ate stu­dent? What mad­ness ensues once that self-same “scholar” uses his aca­d­e­mic super­pow­ers to cat­a­logue Mex­i­can stereo­types in the United States? Mex­tasy! Stu­dents and fac­ulty are in for a MEXSTATIC mul­ti­me­dia pre­sen­ta­tion exam­in­ing dom­i­nant trends in the 21st cen­tury rep­re­sen­ta­tion of Lati­nas and Lati­nos in Amer­i­can pop­u­lar cul­ture. From Hol­ly­wood to Madi­son Avenue, spe­cific and dam­ag­ing visions of Latina/o sub­jec­tiv­ity have infected the synapses of Amer­i­cans, and Mex­i­cans alike. “Eth­nic man­nequins” (such as William Levy, Eva Lon­go­ria, and Sophia Ver­gara) infect con­scious­ness even as they enter­tain. Nor are they divorced from the talk-radio fueled renais­sance on racial­ized hatred. If Lou Dobbs screams hys­ter­i­cally that Mex­i­cans are “dis­eased” and Rush Lim­baugh encour­ages his lis­ten­ers to tell “Mex­i­cans” to go back to “their coun­try,” what are the effects? Research sug­gests that these col­lec­tive efforts have led to a resur­gence of anti-Latino hate and hate crimes at the very moment that the U.S. becomes more demo­graph­i­cally and decid­edly Latino/a. The pre­sen­ta­tion will fea­ture excerpts from Tex[t]-Mex, Eye­giene, the Tex[t]-Mex Gallery­blog and art from Mextasy.

William Ner­ic­cio is Pro­fes­sor of Eng­lish & Com­par­a­tive Lit­er­a­ture and Chi­cana & Chi­cano Stud­ies, and Direc­tor of the Mas­ter of Arts in Lib­eral Arts and Sci­ences pro­gram at San Diego State Uni­ver­sity. He is the author of Tex[t]-Mex: Seduc­tive Hal­lu­ci­na­tions of “Mex­i­cans” in Amer­ica (2007), and edi­tor of The Hurt Busi­ness (2008), and Homer from Sali­nas: John Steinbeck’s Endur­ing Voice for Cal­i­for­nia (2009). Ner­ic­cio blogs at http://textmex.blogspot.com/.

Pre­sented as part of B/ordering Vio­lence: Bound­aries, Gen­der, Indi­gene­ity in the Amer­i­cas, a John E. Sawyer Sem­i­nar in Com­par­a­tive Cul­tures gen­er­ously funded by the Andrew W. Mel­lon Foun­da­tion and co-sponsored by the Latin Amer­i­can & Caribbean Stud­ies pro­gram, the Jack­son School of Inter­na­tional Stud­ies, the Simp­son Cen­ter for the Human­i­ties, and the Insti­tute for the Study of Eth­nic­ity, Race, & Sex­u­al­ity (WISER).

For more on the B/ordering Vio­lence Sem­i­nar Series, visit www.borderingviolence.com.