About mjj22

Current research project The Multi Dimensions of Blackness: Cultural Hegemony in the US and Abroad I am interested in how the concept of race and identity plays a role in how we perceive difference. Moreover, I would like to investigate how colonial powers such as the United States have shaped ideas of race and identity while maintaining colonial rule abroad. This past summer (2012) I was a participant in the Summer Institute in the Art & Humanities. This opportunity allowed me to explore questions concerning race and representation. Why were my peers studying abroad and returning with the same preconceived notions of developing countries? Why were my college classmates representing people and places in the Global South as underdeveloped, religious radicals, uneducated, disease stricken, and confrontational? These questions have driven my interest in globalization, power, borders, and how a variety of people and institutions located in "the West" represent the Global South.

Borders of Kinship: Species/Race/Indigeneity

Thursday, May 23, 2013
4:00pm
Communications 120

https://tegr.it/y/1637h

Bringing the Land to the Fight: Biotechnology and Hawaiian Ontology
Noenoe Silva (Political Science, University of Hawai’i, Manoa) and Jonathan Goldberg-Hiller (Social Sciences, Public Policy Center, University of Hawai’i, Manoa) examine current political struggles of native Hawaiians over the increasing presence of biotechnology corporations in Hawai’i. Biotechnology depends upon conditions that facilitate genetically modified organism (GMO) research and profit from ever-increasing production of genetically modified organisms. Legal regimes of property recognize new organisms that can be controlled, sold, and exploited; analogously, multiculturalist policies recreate identity through denial of indigeneity, refusing land claims by indigenous people that would interfere with biotechnology industries. This impacts Hawaiians’ ability to survive on the land and to (re)create a Hawaiian world, which would include native species, many of them kino lau or native deities. We consider Hawaiian ideas of kalo, for example, as kin and sacred anc!  estor, and other plants, animals, and natural elements as kino lau or body forms of deities, as crucial elements in the struggle against further colonization and towards a resurgence of native lifeways.

Indigenous Approaches to Critical Animal Studies and the New Materialisms?
Kimberly Tallbear (Environmental Sciences, University of California, Berkeley) highlights what indigenous thought has to offer academic theorizing as new critical fields work to dismantle hierarchies in the relationships of “westerners” with their non-human others. For example, “multi-species ethnography” now studies humans and their relations with nonhuman-beings such as dogs, bears, cattle, monkeys, bees, mushrooms, and microorganisms. But the starting points of these inquiries can only partially contain indigenous standpoints. Indigenous peoples never forgot that nonhumans are agential beings engaged in social relations that profoundly shape human lives. Moreover, their non-human others may not even be understood as living. “Objects” and “forces” such as stones, thunder, or stars are known within our ontologies to be sentient and knowing persons. Indigenous approaches also critique settler colonialism and its management of non-human others, linking violenc!  e against animals to violence against particular humans historically accorded less-than-human or animal status.

Presented as part of B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas, a John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Latin American & Caribbean Studies program, the Jackson School of International Studies, the Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, & Sexuality (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Violence Seminar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com.

Symposium: Empires of Capital: Race Across the Atlantic and the Pacific, May 17-18

May 17 and 18, 2013
University of Washington, Seattle

The two-day symposium seeks to theorize and historicize racial capitalism in the modern world. Building on Cedric Robinson’s insight that capitalist development has been pursued and organized fundamentally around race, speakers will strive to uncover the multiple layers of capitalist expansion—ideological, cultural, economic, and social—to reveal and comprehend the tensions and contradictions of racial capitalism in the past and in the present and across the Atlantic and the Pacific.

Friday, May 17
Petersen Room, Allen Library
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Opening Roundtable
Lisa Lowe, Tufts University, “Sugar, Tea, Opium, Coolies: The Intimacies of Four Continents”
Commentators: Moon-Ho Jung, Chandan Reddy, Stephanie Smallwood, and Alys Weinbaum (Conference Organizers)

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.          Session 1
Jennifer Morgan, New York University, “Partus Sequitur Ventrem: Slave Law and the History of Women in Slavery”
Michael Witgen, University of Michigan, “Seeing Red: The Politics of Crime and Punishment on the Northern Borderlands of the Early American Republic”

Saturday, May 18
Husky Union Building, Room 334
10:30 a.m. – Noon      Session 2
Shelley Streeby, University of California, San Diego, “Hubert H. Harrison’s Scrapbooks, Racial Capitalism, and the Black Radical Tradition”
Manu Vimalassery, Texas Tech University, “Native and Black Visions of Self-Determination”

Noon – 1:30 p.m. Lunch Break*

1:30 – 3:30 p.m.          Session 3
Peter James Hudson, Vanderbilt University, “Black Sovereignty and Racial Capitalism: The National City Bank in Haiti and Liberia, 1910-1935”
Jodi Kim, University of California, Riverside, “Debt Imperialism, Settler Modernity, and the Necropolitics of the Promise”
Andrew Friedman, Haverford College, “Meridians and Parallels: Racial Formations on the Global Grid”

3:45 – 4:15 p.m.          Closing Reflections

The symposium is free and open to the public.

*If you will be joining us for a light lunch on Saturday, please RSVP to cspn@uw.edu or 206-543-8656 by Tuesday, May 14.

Sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest, the University of Washington Libraries, the Department of History, the Department of English, the Jackson School of International Studies, and the Simpson Center for the Humanities.

Communities Affected by Mining: The CONACAMI Case and its Impact on Latin America

Thursday, May 2, 2013
4:00 pm
Communication 120

Comunidades afectadas por la minería: el caso CONACAMI y su impacto en América
In November 1998, community leaders from the Peruvian Andes came together in a seminar to discuss the effects of mining in their communities. This could have simply been one more meeting, but the conclusions and agreements of this historic gathering opened a new chapter in the long struggle of Andean communities to defend their rights against the mining industry and state mining policies. This new stage is marked by the leadership of the National Confederation of Communities Affected by Mining in Peru (Confederación Nacional de Comunidades del Perú Afectadas por la Minería – CONACAMI) and the emergence of a movement to denounce the negative impacts of mining and organize opposition to it. This movement is considered one of the iconic articulations of resistance to mining in Latin America. Its most important contribution is generating a public debate over the impacts and benefits of mining.

Luis Vittor is a Peruvian economist and adviser to the Coordinadora Andina de Organizaciones Indígenas (Andean Coordinator of Indigenous Organizations). He has also advised the Confederación de Comunidades del Perú Afectadas por la Minería (CONACAMI, the Confederation of Peruvian Communities Affected by Mining) since its founding. He is of Quechua origin and was born in Cerro de Pasco, Peru. From 2008-2009 he was a Fellow in the Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights, Governance & International Cooperation program at the University Carlos III of Madrid (Spain). He is the author of Resistencias comunitarias a la minería: la experiencia de CONACAMI (Community Resistance to Mining: the CONACAMI experience) (2008) among numerous other publications.
Presentation will be in Spanish with English translation by José Antonio Lucero (Latin American and Caribbean Studies).

Presented as part of B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas, a John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Latin American & Caribbean Studies program, the Jackson School of International Studies, the Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, & Sexuality (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Violence Seminar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com.

Borderlands Graduate Student Coffee hour with Profs. Simpson and Zepeda

Friday April 12, 2013
10:00 am
Location: Communications 206

Contact:  lasuw@uw.edu or 206.685.3435

Borderlands Graduate Student Coffee hour with Audra Simpson and Ofelia Zepeda. Come meet Profs. Simpson and Zepeda for an informal chat with other graduate students interested in borderlands research.

Presented as part of B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas, a John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Latin American & Caribbean Studies program, the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, the Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, & Sexuality (WISER).

For more on the B/ordering Violence Seminar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and www.borderingviolence.com

Mapping Sovereignty: Indigenous Borderlands

Thursday, April 11, 2013
4:00 pm, reception to follow
Communications 120
University of Washington, Seattle Campus

Audra Simpson (Anthropology, Columbia University) “Indian Territory, the Racialized Life of Treaty and Settler Sovereignty”

Haudenosaunee – or “The Iroquois” – are an Indigenous Confederacy of Six Nations that interrupt the narratives that attempts to explain them as well as the states that purport to lawfully own and administer their land. Nowhere is this made clearer than in Iroquois interpretations of the Jay Treaty of 1794 and Iroquois movement across the US-Canada border—an international border that cuts through their historical and contemporary territory and is, simply, in their space and in their way. It is through their actions, and in particular, their mobility on their own terms, that Indigenous border crossers enact their understandings of history and law, understandings that are then received in particular ways – racializing, criminalizing, and delimiting. Nonetheless, Haudenosaunee push against all of this as they move across various borders: territorial, temporal and juridical, in their active relationships to land and to each other.  Audra Simpson explores the historica! l, legal, political and ethnographic life of Iroquois nationhood across borders, and contends that their continued life and action calls into deep question the conceit of territorial certainty and settler sovereignty itself.

Ofelia Zepeda (American Indian Studies, University of Arizona) “The Tohono O’odham and the Border: A Personal Perspective”

Ofelia Zepeda is a member of the Tohono O’odham Nation. She contends, “Early on we were not really aware of an international border since movement between the U.S. and Mexico was fairly free, especially for the Tohono O’odham. The understanding of a political border is something fairly recent and does not come into play when one moves with family and kin back and forth in this desert space, where the political border is situated is all one great extension of a people’s home, culture, language and land. This in a sense is my perspective as a member of the O’odham Nation. But, things have changed.” In her talk, she shares her personal perspective, moving back and forth from the time before the true realization of a border and today when things are magnified by the border.
Presented as part of B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas, a John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Latin American & Caribbean Studies program, the Jackson School of International Studies, the Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, & Sexuality (WISER).
For more on the B/ordering Violence Seminar Series, visit depts.washington.edu/uwch/programs/initiatives/bordering-violence and  www.borderingviolence.com.

 

Seattle Fandango Project workshop

Saturday, March 2
12:30-2:30pm
El Centro de la Raza
2425 16th Ave S
Seattle, WA 98144

What is Fandango / Que es el Fandango

Fandango jarocho is a four-hundred-year-old tradition from Veracruz, Mexico born from the encounter between European, Indigenous, African, and Arab cultures. After being canonized by the Mexican government, El Nuevo Movimiento Jaranero reclaimed the musical celebration of fandango in the 1970’s as a space for community transformation and empowerment. Over the last twenty years, Chicano and Mexican communities in the U.S. have engaged with communities in Veracruz to use fandango as a technology for community building and social justice that transcends national borders.

The Seattle Fandango Project joins this movement by using the fandango to build and transform community. As a technology (in the analog), fandango contains protocols within dance, music, verse, and participation that provide new channels of communication, connection, and understanding. People find themselves through musical interaction with others, and both individually and communally realize new possibilities and ways of being. This is convivencia, to convene and coexist. Once people leave fandango, this new sense of self carries over to other parts of their lives.

 

Dialogues of Resistance and Healing” with Quetzal Flores, Martha Gonzalez, and Kali Niño

Friday, March 1
6:00pm
Union Culture Center
803 S. King St. Seattle, Wa 98104. Corner of S. King St. + 8 Ave. S., International District

Please join the Seat­tle Fan­dango Project and Union Cul­tural Cen­ter in a con­ver­sa­tion about com­mu­nity music as a site of resis­tance and healing. Potluck style This event is free and all ages. Dona­tions grate­fully accepted.

Fea­tur­ing scholar and dancer, Raquel Rivera; Chican@ Artivist@s Martha Gon­za­lez (who is also a doc­toral can­di­date in Fem­i­nist Stud­ies at UW) and Quet­zal Flo­res of the Grammy award win­ning East L.A. band, Quet­zal; and Kali Niño, fan­dan­guera of Toronto and San Andres Tuxt­las and mem­ber of Cafe con Pan.

“Confessions of a Mexican American Hoarder” or “Prowling the Caucasian Bestiary”: The Existential and Insane Consequences of Collecting Latina/o Artifacts and Stereotypes

William Nericcio
English & Comparative Literature, and Chicana & Chicano Studies San Diego State University

Thursday, February 28, 2013
4:00 pm
Communications 120

What happens to the mind of a relatively sane Mexican American academic when doused with the derisive laughter of an East Coast undergraduate student? What madness ensues once that self-same “scholar” uses his academic superpowers to catalogue Mexican stereotypes in the United States? Mextasy! Students and faculty are in for a MEXSTATIC multimedia presentation examining dominant trends in the 21st century representation of Latinas and Latinos in American popular culture. From Hollywood to Madison Avenue, specific and damaging visions of Latina/o subjectivity have infected the synapses of Americans, and Mexicans alike. “Ethnic mannequins” (such as William Levy, Eva Longoria, and Sophia Vergara) infect consciousness even as they entertain. Nor are they divorced from the talk-radio fueled renaissance on racialized hatred. If Lou Dobbs screams hysterically that Mexicans are “diseased” and Rush Limbaugh encourages his listeners to tell “Mexicans” to go back to “their country,” what are the effects? Research suggests that these collective efforts have led to a resurgence of anti-Latino hate and hate crimes at the very moment that the U.S. becomes more demographically and decidedly Latino/a. The presentation will feature excerpts from Tex[t]-Mex, Eyegiene, the Tex[t]-Mex Galleryblog and art from Mextasy.

William Nericcio is Professor of English & Comparative Literature and Chicana & Chicano Studies, and Director of the Master of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences program at San Diego State University. He is the author of Tex[t]-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of “Mexicans” in America (2007), and editor of The Hurt Business (2008), and Homer from Salinas: John Steinbeck’s Enduring Voice for California (2009). Nericcio blogs at http://textmex.blogspot.com/.

Presented as part of B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas, a John E. Sawyer Seminar in Comparative Cultures generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by the Latin American & Caribbean Studies program, the Jackson School of International Studies, the Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Institute for the Study of Ethnicity, Race, & Sexuality (WISER).

For more on the B/ordering Violence Seminar Series, visit www.borderingviolence.com.