Results of Season 1, Part 3

Haven’t read the previous two parts? You can find Part 1 here, and Part 2 here!

In addition to surveying, Hollis and I set up a grid for surface collection up at the northeastern-most surface scatter. Surface collection is a tried-and-true method of identifying archaeological sites and areas-of-interest in historical archaeology. Very often–particularly here, where the site isn’t very old and there is probably not a lot of dirt being deposited on the ground over time–much of what we are interested it is on, near, or predicted by what is on the surface.

Scan of our field forms showing an idealized grid.

Figure 1: Scan of our field forms showing an idealized grid.

Our surface collection strategy involved setting up a 2-meter grid in a 20m by 20m area. This gives us 100 quadrats, or grid squares, to investigate (Figures 1 and 2). Each square is given a unique identifier, so we can make sure to keep all artifacts we find in it together. There are two reasons for picking this method. First, it means we don’t have to decide what to point plot. One way of collecting surface material is to take a GPS or total station and record either every artifact you find, or centerpoints for collections of artifacts. Recording every artifact is time consuming, given that most are going to be small fragments. It also means you either have to use a total station or a really good GPS unit, as most GPS units will not have enough precision for what you want. Recording clusters of artifacts is easier, but more arbitrary (how do you define a cluster?) and is difficult to visualize and analyze in a GIS. By collecting everything within a quadrat, we avoid dealing with some of these issues.

Corner of the surface collection with plants cleared.

Figure 1: Corner of the surface collection with plants cleared.

Second, it lets us systematically clear the surface. For each square, we scraped the surface with trowels and 1/8″ screened the surface debris. We scraped the surface to clear away mold, tree and root debris, and loose material. Once we could see dirt (or humus), we stopped (Figure 3). The reason for this is that much of the site is covered not only in living plants, but in not-yet-decayed plant remains. So even if you clear all plant growth (which we also did), your surface artifacts may still be obscured by recent plant matter. Setting up grid squares allowed us to systematically clear each square in its entirety, revealing a great deal more material than we would have found otherwise and giving us a better estimate of the below-surface distribution of artifacts. It also meant that when we screened the material we cleared (to find any small artifacts caught up in it), we knew where in space the screened material came from and had control over how we collected it.

Hollis Miller, Sam Hordesk, and Joyce LeCompte-Mastenbrook helping to clear a quadrat.

Figure 3: Hollis Miller, Sam Hordesk, and Joyce LeCompte-Mastenbrook helping to clear a quadrat.

The Results

It’s a truism in research that everything takes longer than you think it will, and that’s no less the case here. The surface collection is still ongoing, but I hope to have some preliminary results and pictures up soon!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *