Job Title: Executive Assistant to the President Employment Type: Full Time

Location: Seattle, WA, US

Apply URL: https://nbr.applicantpro.com/jobs/785721.html

Job Description:

The National Bureau of Asian Research (NBR), a Seattle-based research think tank, is seeking an Executive Assistant to the President. The Executive Assistant provides administrative support for NBR’s President and, when needed, other members of the President’s management team. The President’s management team includes executives, the Board and Corporate Relations Director, and the Center for Innovation, Trade, and Strategy (CITS) Senior Director. The ideal candidate will be a high energy, positive, and flexible person who loves to support others. This is a great opportunity to get your feet wet by supporting executives and managers and immersing yourself in a research think tank.

Much of the President’s work is focused on fundraising, so a background in raising money and business development is a plus. There is also an opportunity to provide research and writing support in preparation for the President’s meetings, speeches, and presentations. This is a full-time (40 hours per week), hourly, non-exempt position reporting to the President. The position is available immediately, and salary is commensurate with the successful candidate’s qualifications. NBR offers a benefits package that includes health insurance, transit benefits, 401k with matching, paid vacation/sick/holidays, and more.

Responsibilities

Be the right hand of the President and support a wide range of duties, big and small Serve as the primary point of contact for the President and communicate on his behalf with internal staff, funders, and NBR affiliates Manage the President’s calendar, schedule meetings, and arrange travel and logistics Prepare meeting materials, agendas, correspondence, etc.

Coordinate special projects and events, including venue selection, rsvp tracking, day-of venue set up, planning transportation and logistics for participants, etc.

Handle a variety of assignments involving confidential information where discretion must be used Maintain the hardcopy and the electronic filing system for the President Manage the President’s timecard and submit hours on a bi-monthly basis Manage the President’s expenses, including tracking credit card receipts, creating expense reports, approving invoices, and submitting reimbursement requests on behalf of the President Provide research and writing support in preparation for the President’s meetings, speeches, and presentations Provide administrative support for the President’s management team, including managers reporting directly to the President and executives; this may involve arranging travel, event planning, fundraising drives, etc.

Complete other administrative duties such as answering phones, faxing, mailing, running errands, etc. as necessary

Qualifications

The successful candidate must possess superior organizational and communication skills, and the ability to efficiently and effectively manage a wide range of disparate tasks and responsibilities. Discretion and confidentiality are critical for this position. The ideal candidate will be a fast learner with a can-do attitude. He or she must be able to put his/herself in the shoes of the President in order to anticipate requests and act ahead of the curve. One or more years of relevant professional experience desirable. A master’s degree and two-year commitment are preferred.

About NBR

The National Bureau of Asian Research is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research institution dedicated to informing and strengthening policy in the Asia-Pacific. NBR conducts advanced independent research on strategic, political, economic, globalization, health, and energy issues affecting U.S. relations with Asia. To learn more about NBR, please visit www.nbr.org.

Applicant Instructions

To apply, submit the following materials through NBR’s employment site (https://nbr.applicantpro.com/jobs/). The deadline is Thursday, May 31.

Resume

Cover letter stating qualifications for and interest in applying for the position, and availability Contact information of three references Writing sample

Apply at https://nbr.applicantpro.com/jobs/785721.html

The UW Pipeline Project and Dream Project are hiring 4 dynamic AmeriCorps members for 2018-2019. Applications due May 7th.

UW Pipeline Project and Dream Project Ameri­Corps mem­bers will recruit and support UW students involved in K-12 tutoring, college access mentoring, and promoting equity in education. Our programs focus on educating UW students through transformational community experiences, and working with K-12 educators to help prepare the college students of tomorrow. The AmeriCorps team will conduct outreach to increase participation in our programs, support tutors and mentors on campus, and assist in programs related to educational equity. AmeriCorps members will serve from September 1st, 2018-July 15th, 2019.

The Pipeline Project is hiring for two positions:
Educational Equity Coordinator position description here
Equity in STEM Coordinator position description here

The Dream Project is hiring for two positions:

Student Services Coordinator

Curriculum Development Coordinator

Position descriptions are available here.

 

Applications can be submitted here.

The application deadline is Monday, May 7th, 2018 by 11:59 PM.

 

For more information, you are welcome to attend an information session on Thursday May 3rd from 3-4pm in MGH 224
If you have any questions about the positions or the application process, please email:
Pipeline Project
: Sarah at srbishop@uw.edu
Dream Project: Nesley at nbravo@uw.edu

You are also welcome to talk with other staff members of Pipeline in MGH 171 or Dream Project in MGH 274.

 

 

Week 6 & 7 Small Group Career Coaching

How to Talk About Yourself (All A&S Majors): Monday, April 30th from 3-3:45pm in Guthrie 057

Talking about yourself and sharing what you are good at can be a challenge. But it is also a skill you need to be successful at networking and interviewing. Join me for a small group career coaching session where we’ll discuss strategies for sharing your strengths, skills, and interests so you’ll be ready to go the next time someone says “Tell me about yourself.”

Registration here.

Playing to Your Strengths in the Natural Sciences: Wednesday, May 9th from 3:30-4:15 in Guthrie 211

The top three skills employers desire include critical thinking, communication, and teamwork/collaboration. These are the exact skills you’ve developed as students in the natural sciences. In this session, we’ll discuss how to talk about your science background, connect your experiences, translate your skills to whatever might come next.

Registration here.

For more information about Small Group Career Coaching, visit https://careers.uw.edu/career-coaching.

STUDYING HUMANITIES TEACHES YOU HOW TO GET A JOB

Forget the tut-tutting of politicians: The skills you learn in the humanities are exactly the skills you use in a job search.

Published in thge Pacific Standard https://psmag.com/education/studying-humanities-teaches-you-how-to-get-a-job

“If you’re studying interpretive dance, God bless you, but there’s not a lot of jobs right now in America looking for people with that as a skill set,” Kentucky governor Matt Bevin declared in September, at a conference about higher education. Bevin’s skepticism about the humanities and arts isn’t an anomaly; politicians regularly joke about the supposed uselessness of non-STEM training. In 2014, President Barack Obama told students to major in trades rather than art history. In 2011, Governor Rick Scott of Florida said that it wasn’t of “vital interest” to his state to have students major in anthropology. And so on. Math, engineering, science, trades: Those are practical, politicians agree. Literature, art, and anthropology? Those don’t help you get jobs.

In fact, the reverse is true: The skills you learn in the humanities are exactly the skills you use in a job search. The humanities teach students to understand the different rules and expectations that govern different genres, to examine social cues and rituals, to think about the audience for and reception of different kinds of communications. In short, they teach students how to apply for the kinds of jobs students will be looking for after college.

This is not the usual argument in defense of the humanities. Usually, those rebutting STEM-obsessed politicians point to the spiritual role of the arts, or evoke the general benefits of critical thinking. “The humanities conserve and safeguard those aspects of our being that intersect with the meanings of human existence beyond industry,” Sarah Churchwell, chair of public humanities at the University of London, writes. Churchwell isn’t wrong: The humanities do have value that isn’t easily reflected in dollars and cents on the market. So do non-humanities fields, for that matter. Math and science and nursing and engineering can all create a sense of curiosity, wonder, and civic engagement. But these fields also have potential career benefits—and the humanities have as well.

EVEN POLITICIANS CRAFTING ANTI-HUMANITIES PROPAGANDA ARE USING TECHNIQUES ASSOCIATED WITH THE HUMANITIES.

In particular, the humanities teach the skills needed for applying for jobs. These skills are specific to the task of getting hired, and can be distinct from the skills you need to actually perform a job successfully. Someone following Obama’s advice and majoring in a trade, for example, may still need to produce a cover letter. Even if you’re looking for a job in STEM, you need to be able to write persuasively.

Most people grudgingly admit that writing is a necessary skill, however tainted by the humanities it might be. But applying for a job doesn’t just involve composing a single essay. Today, to apply for a job, you need to create a range of writings in different genres. You need to have a business card, a LinkedIn profile, a resume, and a cover letter, and often you need to fill out a separate application as well. Each of these documents is supposed to support and refer to the others, to create an overarching narrative about who you are and why you deserve the job. That narrative, in turn, is supposed to inform, and be buttressed by, one or more interviews. Text and performance have to fit together.

Study in history, literature, anthropology, and other fields in the humanities is designed to teach students to master just such tasks. Students in humanities classes are asked to examine and synthesize multiple sources to create written or oral presentations. They are also asked to think about the different requirements of different genres. Identifying the characteristics of a successful sonnet isn’t that different from identifying the characteristics of a successful resume. Resumes involve creating a story about who you are—and part of the point of the humanities is teaching that this requires both attention to detail and creativity.

In creating a cover letter or a resume, you want to make yourself look like everyone else, and you also want to make yourself stand out. The study of literature (as one example) is designed to teach students to recognize broad categories of works, and successful individual variation. It helps students understand how to approach a writing task with one eye on generic conventions, and one on creating an individual, particular impression. The job process requires students to take a great deal of information and squish it into a small, ill-fitting container. That’s also a fair description of writing a research paper. Doing the second is good practice for the first.

Studying humanities also teaches students about anticipating and understanding audiences. When you apply for a job, you read a job description, search online, and try to put together a picture of what the people at the company are like, and what they want from you. These skills are precisely what disciplines like anthropology and history teach. Students in these fields gather information from books, interviews, and observation to put together a picture of a different culture. In the arts, students create works in an effort to impress, or move, an imagined audience. In the job search, you are looking at yourself from the outside, and trying to think about how some other particular group, with particular needs and interests, will judge your work. You are essentially turning yourself into a work of written-and-performance art to be evaluated.

Studying humanities allows you to see yourself through others’ eyes by teaching you about other cultures and other ways of viewing the world. By understanding others and entering into their worlds, we become better and broader people. This is valuable in itself. But it is also an important skill because understanding how someone else thinks is essential if you are trying to get them to like you, or give you a job.

Even politicians crafting anti-humanities propaganda are using techniques associated with the humanities as part of their job application process. When Bevin sneers at dance majors, he’s betting that the electorate doesn’t tend to like dance majors. He’s turning a complex issue into an aesthetically striking slogan in order to sway his employers (i.e. voters), whom he hopes to convince to renew his contract. He’s engaged in a kind of dance of his own. And that dance, despite Bevin’s protests to the contrary, is familiar to humanities majors and job seekers alike.

 

Job Hunting in the Digital Age

Like many recent college graduates, Ben Kim felt he was casting his résumé into an abyss when he clicked “apply online” for the hundredth or so time. “The most common response was nothing,” he said.

That may be because, before capturing an employer’s eye, job hunters in the digital age often have to get past a round of robots scanning their résumé for keywords.

Although the business of hiring is still largely a manual process, employers are experimenting with increasingly sophisticated technology. Some companies are setting loose automated recruiters that crawl the web for the perfect hire, based on an algorithm. Others are asking job candidates to answer their first round of interview questions via video — perhaps not a huge ask for members of the YouTube generation.

Use Keywords

Many recruiters use tracking systems to sift through virtual piles of résumés searching for specific qualifications — say, software developers fluent in a programming language — or previous jobs that illustrate leadership qualities. What does this mean for applicants?

“Make sure you are carefully reviewing the job description and aligning your experience and transferable skills based on what the organization is looking for,” said Mercy Eyadiel, associate vice president of career development and corporate engagement at Wake Forest University. “If you don’t, you risk not showing up in the list of potential candidates for consideration,” which is often based on keyword searches. That doesn’t mean regurgitating job descriptions or being untruthful, but it does require imagination. “If they are looking for project management skills, and you ran for student government and had to run big projects,” Ms. Eyadiel said, “that counts.

For tech jobs, be sure to list what computer hardware and software you know so it’s picked up in keyword searches. “Know the acronyms, and also spell it out,” said Paul McDonald, senior executive director at the job placement agency Robert Half.

Enterprise Holdings, the car rental company, hires thousands of new graduates each year as part of its management training program. It uses iCIMS, a type of talent acquisition software, to sort through volumes of candidates, generally 50,000 a month, and identify those who meet five or so minimum requirements, including a bachelor’s degree, satisfactory driving record and some kind of leadership position or customer service experience. Candidates who pass the screening process are then connected with a recruiter.

Stay Current

Keep your online persona up-to-date, particularly if you add new skills. Why? Some employers maintain a pool of candidates who have applied (but were rejected) for specific jobs, so that they can reach out if a more suitable position arises.

Recruiters’ software also trolls profiles on LinkedIn and other social media sites, analysts said, providing employers with updates.

Be Camera Ready

Before asking candidates to come into the office, some employers try to get to know them better. They might conduct an interview over, say, Skype, or send a company-branded link to a set of questions whose answers the candidates can record on their computer’s webcam.

Sometimes employers record applicants performing a task, like computer coding. “The way the camera is set up, the recruiter can see the candidate doing the work,” said Claire Schooley, a principal analyst at Forrester Research who tracks recruitment-software providers.

Go Offline

Ramit Sethi, author of “I Will Teach You to Be Rich,” suggests avoiding the “apply online” black hole altogether. “It is this tired old tune that people predictably and understandably sing because they send out 500 résumés and get zero response,” said Mr. Sethi, who offers online video courses on topics like finding your dream job. “That is a very passive way of finding a job.” He recommends getting to know the company and someone inside first.

Paul D’Arcy, a senior vice president at Indeed.com, the job search site, also sees technology as the scapegoat for futile job searches. “If you have applied to 200 jobs and aren’t hearing back,” he said, “then you need to change your strategy. It could be you are looking in an area where supply and demand is so out of balance that it is not a promising field. And the other option is, you are not taking the time to personalize your communication, or your résumé isn’t clearly communicating what you bring.” Fixing one or both of those things, he said, “should change the results you are getting.”

Mr. Kim did both. He had started applying for jobs, largely in marketing, as a senior at the University of Notre Dame, and continued the job hunt from his parents’ house in Los Angeles. To earn pocket money, he worked odd jobs — as an SAT tutor, an office assistant — and tried graduate school for a semester.

But about a year after graduation, he finally found “the bottom of the ladder I wanted to climb,” software user-experience design, and overhauled his approach. He located software designers who lived nearby, went to their meet-ups and asked how they got started and what books they read. He also started freelancing, and made a short list of companies he wanted to learn more about.

A fortuitous exchange on Twitter with the head of one of those companies led to an internship, and ultimately a full-time position — two years after graduation.

His biggest lesson? “Talk to people and not to a résumé website,” he said. “You would be surprised how receptive people are when you just email them or message them on LinkedIn and just ask for help.”

Report busts myth of unemployable humanities grads

No, they’re not all working as baristas. When it comes to pay, job satisfaction and career advancement, humanities majors do just fine, a new report says

The American Academy of Arts & Sciences wants you to know that studying the humanities is not a career-killing dead end.

In “The State of the Humanities 2018,” released last week, the national academy makes the case that humanities majors are doing just fine when it comes to pay, job satisfaction and career advancement.

And the report comes on the heels of a new Microsoft e-book on artificial intelligence, which discusses an important role that the social sciences and humanities will have in the development and management of artificial intelligence.

The academy’s report, which is based on U.S. census data and Gallup polling of workers nationwide, aims to show that humanities majors find jobs after college, don’t make that much less than other college graduates and are generally happy with their jobs.

The researchers found that the median wage of a humanities major in 2015 was $52,000, or about $8,000 lower than the median for all college graduates. They do better, however, than graduates who majored in the life sciences, the arts or education.

They’re also paid significantly more than those with only an associate degree or high-school diploma.

Almost 87 percent reported they were satisfied with their job in 2015.

The report measured financial satisfaction with a survey that asked respondents for a yes-or-no answer to these questions: “I have enough money to do everything I want to do” and “In the last seven days, I have worried about money.” While 42 percent of humanities majors said they had enough money, their financial satisfaction wasn’t too far below that of engineers, 51 percent of whom said they had enough money to do what they wanted to do.

Unemployment among humanities majors — as in all fields — rose during the recession but is down now, to just about 4 percent among workers ages 24 to 55. And about 14 percent had jobs in management.

The picture isn’t all rosy. More than a third of humanities majors said there was no relationship between their job and their degree. About a third with bachelor’s degrees were employed in sales, service, office and administrative support jobs.

Humanities majors who went on to get an advanced degree, beyond a bachelor’s, generally did better, with higher median salaries and a closer match between their degrees and their occupations.

In its new book, Microsoft called for more liberal arts majors to study computer engineering, and for more tech engineers to take classes in the liberal arts

“The Future Computed: Artificial Intelligence and Its Role in Society” includes an introduction by Microsoft President Brad Smith and the company’s executive vice president of Microsoft Artificial Intelligence, Harry Shum.

“Skilling-up for an AI-powered world involves more than science, technology, engineering and math,” the two executives wrote in a blog post about the book. “As computers behave more like humans, the social sciences and humanities will become even more important. Languages, art, history, economics, ethics, philosophy, psychology and human-development courses can teach critical, philosophical and ethics-based skills that will be instrumental in the development and management of AI solutions.

“If AI is to reach its potential in serving humans, then every engineer will need to learn more about the liberal arts and every liberal arts major will need to learn more about engineering,” Smith and Shum wrote.

Six Myths About Choosing a College Major

Published in the New York Times Education Life section.

Many colleges ask you to choose a major as early as your senior year of high school, on your admissions application. Yet there’s a good chance you’ll change your mind. The Education Department says that about 30 percent of students switch majors at least once.

Students get plenty of advice about picking a major. It turns out, though, that most of it is from family and friends, according to a September Gallup survey. Only 11 percent had sought guidance from a high school counselor, and 28 percent from a college adviser. And most didn’t think that the advice was especially helpful. Maybe it’s because much of the conventional thinking about majors is wrong

Take the median lifetime earnings of business majors, the most popular undergraduate degree. The typical graduate earns $2.86 million over a lifetime. When you put business graduates side by side with those who graduated with what are considered low-paying majors, you’ll see that those who are slightly above the median salary in their fields are not that far behind the business grads. For example, an English major in the 60th percentile makes $2.76 million in a lifetime, a major in psychology $2.57 million and a history major $2.64 million.

Myth 2: Women want to have it all.

Women are now the clear majority on college campuses, making up 56 percent of students enrolled this fall. They are also more likely than men to graduate.

But when it comes to selecting a major, what women choose tends to segregate them into lower paying fields, such as education and social services, according to a report that Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce will publish later this year. Just look at some of the highest paying fields and the proportion of women who major in them: business economics (31 percent), chemical engineering (28 percent), computer science (20 percent), electrical engineering (10 percent), mechanical engineering (8 percent).

“Women can’t win even as they dominate at every level of higher education,” said Anthony P. Carnevale, director of the Georgetown center.

Dr. Carnevale wouldn’t speculate as to why women make their choices. But he notes that if the proportion of women in fields where men dominate increased by just 10 percent, the gender pay gap would narrow considerably: from 78 cents paid to women for every dollar men receive to 90 cents for every dollar men receive.

Myth 3: Choice of major matters more than choice of college.

Not so. In seven states — Arkansas, Colorado, Minnesota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Washington — students can search public databases for early earnings of graduates of institutions within the state. And those databases show that students who graduate from more selective schools tend to make more money. After all, the better the college, the better the professional network opportunities, through alumni, parents of classmates and eventually classmates themselves.

These undergraduates are more able to pursue majors in lower paying fields because their networks help them land good jobs. Arts, humanities and social science majors are more prevalent on elite campuses than at second-tier colleges, where students tend to pick vocational majors like business, education and health. In all, more than half of students at less selective schools major in career-focused subjects; at elite schools, less than a quarter do, according to an analysis by the website FiveThirtyEight of the 78 “most selective schools” in Barron’s rankings, compared with 1,800 “less selective schools.”

“Students at selective colleges are allowed to explore their intellectual curiosity as undergraduates because they will get their job training in graduate school or have access to a network that gets them top jobs, regardless of their undergraduate major,” Dr. Carnevale said.

They are also more likely to have two majors than students at second-tier colleges, who tend to be more financially needy and have to work, affording less time to double major.

One tip: Complementary majors with overlapping requirements are easier to juggle, but two unrelated majors probably yield bigger gains in the job market, said Richard N. Pitt, an associate professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University who has studied the rise of the double major. “It increases your breadth of knowledge,” he said.

Myth 4: Liberal arts majors are unemployable.

The liberal arts is a favorite target of politicians, with the latest salvo coming from the governor of Kentucky, Matt Bevin. “If you’re studying interpretive dance, God bless you, but there’s not a lot of jobs right now in America looking for people with that as a skill set,” Governor Bevin said in a speech in September.

Interpretive dance may not be in demand, but the competencies that liberal arts majors emphasize — writing, synthesis, problem solving — are sought after by employers. A 2017 study by David J. Deming, an associate professor of education and economics at Harvard, found jobs requiring both the so-called soft skills and thinking skills have seen the largest growth in employment and pay in the last three decades.

One knock on the liberal arts is that it’s difficult to find a first job. But a study by Burning Glass Technologies, a Boston-based company that analyzes job-market trends, concluded that if liberal arts graduates gain proficiency in one of eight technical skills, such as social media or data analysis, their prospects of landing entry-level jobs increase substantially.

The long-held belief by parents and students that liberal arts graduates are unemployable ignores the reality of the modern economy, where jobs require a mix of skills not easily packaged in a college major, said George Anders, author of “You Can Do Anything: The Surprising Power of a ‘Useless’ Liberal Arts Education.” In his book, Mr. Anders profiles graduates with degrees in philosophy, sociology and linguistics in jobs as diverse as sales, finance and market research.

“Once C.E.O.s see liberal arts graduates in action,” Mr. Anders said, “they come aboard to the idea that they need more of them.”

Myth 5: It’s important to choose a major early.

Why settle on a field of study before experiencing the smorgasbord college has to offer, be it study abroad, a club activity or a surprising elective?

Of students who said they felt committed to their major when they arrived on campus, 20 percent had selected a new major by the end of their first year, according to a national survey by the University of California, Los Angeles.

Changing majors can cost you a semester or two, especially if you switch to one unrelated to your first choice. To reduce that risk, several schools, including Arizona State University, Georgia State University and Lehman College in the Bronx, have created “meta-majors,” which group majors under a larger academic umbrella.

“We have moved away from trying to get students to choose their majors as they enter,” said Timothy Renick, Georgia State’s vice provost and vice president for enrollment management and student success.

Instead, all incoming students choose from one of seven meta-majors, representing large academic and work force fields, such as business, education and STEM. First semester, students gather in learning communities and register for a block of general-education courses within that meta-major. Programming is designed so that students get to know the differences between majors within the field.

“Students in our business meta-major get to understand the difference between finance, accounting, management and marketing so they can choose their major from an informed perspective,” Dr. Renick said. They usually do by the end of their first year.

Myth 6: You need a major.

A handful of colleges, including Indiana University and the Evergreen State College, offer the option to ignore the official list of majors and design a course of study. Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor for The Times, designed his at Indiana — enigmatology.

“Majors are artificial and restrictive,” said Christine Ortiz, a dean at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on leave to design a new nonprofit university that will have no majors, and also no lectures or classrooms.

“Majors result from the academic structure of the university, tied to the classic academic disciplines. There is no reason they need to be boxed up like that. They don’t take into account emerging fields that cross disciplines.”

Majors tend to lag behind changes in the workplace. No wonder fewer than a third of college graduates work in jobs related to their majors. And picking one based on today’s in-demand jobs is risky, said Dr. Webber of Temple, especially if the occupation is threatened by automation.

“I would argue against majoring in accounting,” he said, “or anything that a computer can be programmed to do.”

UW + Microsoft Mentors for A&S Majors

LinkedIn has identified over 4,400 UW alumni working at Microsoft, and they come from all majors and degree programs. For students in the UW College of Arts & Sciences, understanding roles for liberal arts backgrounds at tech companies might seem challenging because there is not a prescribed, linear route for the majority of our majors. This program will change your perspective on what the world of work looks like, not just at a tech company but through the lens and guidance of diverse professionals interested in helping you better understand professional life after your undergraduate degree.

Priority application deadline: April 23, 2018

More information + application: c21.uw.edu/microsoft

Details:

  • Mentoring will take place during autumn quarter 2018
  • Students will travel to the Microsoft campus in Redmond for mentor meetings
  • Mentoring will be in small groups of students meeting with a professional at Microsoft
  • Explore topics related to professional preparation and growth, networking and feedback
  • Gain insight and guidance about career paths based on goals, skills, background, strengths and personality
  • This program is not a recruitment or placement program, but a mentoring opportunity to discover relationships between tech and non-technical degrees

Liberal arts degree delivers liberal earnings and job satisfaction

As leaders at Microsoft, Google and other tech companies have stated, we need liberal arts majors who study STEM and STEM majors who study the humanities, arts, and social sciences

American higher education has been the envy of the world since World War II. In contrast to most other countries, in which undergraduates specialize in a single subject from the moment they arrive at university, American higher education has provided a broad and deep education in arts, humanities, social sciences and natural sciences to all our undergraduate students, whatever their major. This American educational model is now at risk.

Student enrollments in literature, history, philosophy and the arts — broadly, “the liberal arts” — began to drop nationally in the wake of the 2008-2009 recession and have continued to decline. At the University of Washington, these declines have now reached startling proportions. In the past five years alone, the number of UW students majoring in history has dropped more than 50 percent. English majors have dropped 42 percent. Foreign language majors have dropped by a third, as have majors in other core liberal arts subjects such as philosophy and political science.

This decline is happening at a time when the world is becoming increasingly interconnected, and when the need to understand other languages and cultures and the responsibilities of democratic citizenship have never been more important. Yet students are fleeing these areas of study in droves. Instead, they are enrolling in the natural sciences, technology, engineering, computer science, information sciences and mathematics — the so-called “STEM” disciplines.

Many explanations have been offered for this shift. These range from the undeniable importance and excitement of the STEM fields, to improved math and science education at the K-12 levels, to the influence of political and business leaders concerned about the competitiveness of American industry. These explanations are all part of the story; but I believe the fundamental causes of this shift are economic. Since 2009, students and their parents have come to believe that liberal arts majors will not be employable when they graduate (except, perhaps, as baristas), whereas STEM degrees offer both certainty of employment and high salaries.

These beliefs are unfounded. National and local data shows that unemployment rates are essentially the same for STEM majors as they are for humanities majors; and although liberal arts majors have somewhat lower starting salaries, their salaries rise more quickly over the course of their working lives than do those of engineers. As Seattle Times higher education reporter Katherine Long has reported [“Report busts myth of unemployable humanities grads,” Feb. 12] and The New York Times [“Six Myths About Choosing a College Major, Nov. 3] has confirmed, liberal arts majors often outstrip STEM graduates in lifetime earnings and in job satisfaction ratings.

The graduating class of the UW’s Jackson School of International Studies (in which majors have dropped 20 percent since 2013) is an excellent example of the strong job market for liberal arts majors. Six months after graduation in June 2017, 93 percent of Jackson School students were either employed or in further education. Only 4 percent were still looking for work, with another 3 percent doing volunteer work or traveling.

Nor were these just any jobs. Their employers included the federal government Departments of State, Health and Human Services and the House of Representatives; the Washington State Senate and the state Attorney General’s Office; and, in the private sector, Expedia, Microsoft, Amazon, Deloitte, Accenture, and All Nippon Airways, among many others.

If statistics like these leave you cold, consider recent UW graduate Janelle Lena White, who graduated in 2013 with a double major in history and American ethnic studies. When asked about data analysis during her job interview with Google, her answer drew upon her experience extracting information from an Aztec document — experience she gained in a class on pre-Colombian Latin American history. Google hired her on the spot. She realized Google was most concerned that she could write and speak well, think critically and creatively, assess problems from a multitude of vantage points, and analyze trends and data. These are skills forged in the humanities and the social sciences — the very subjects our students are currently avoiding.

So far, reports like these, whether statistical or anecdotal, have had little impact on popular perceptions that STEM graduates are more employable than liberal arts graduates. Will these new reports make a difference? Time will tell. But the stakes are high. Our country needs both STEM majors and liberal arts majors. And as leaders at Microsoft, Google and other tech companies have plainly stated, we also need liberal arts majors who study STEM and STEM majors who study the humanities, arts, and social sciences.

The current flight from the liberal arts is hurting American competitiveness and limiting our students’ career prospects. It is time for all of us, not just baristas, to wake up and smell the coffee.

Marketing & Communications Job & Internship Fair APR 26th 2-5

Are you interested in pursuing a full-time, part-time, and/or an internship opportunity in Advertising, Broadcasting, Journalism, Marketing, Public Relations, Publishing, Radio/TV/Film, or Social Media?  Don’t miss out the chance to network with employers who are looking to hire HUSKIES at the 3rd annual Marking, Media and Communications Fair! This targeted fair will give you the opportunity to connect directly with recruiters from local and/or national companies who are looking to hire UW students for job or internship opportunities.

TIPS ON HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE FAIR

  • Look at sample resumes in the Career Guide and consider using resume-help resources provided by the Career & Internship Center
  • Once you have your resume drafted, stop by for a Same-Day Session to get some feedback on it
  • Take a look at the attending employers list (see below) and spend a few minutes researching the employers you are interested in meeting with by visiting their web sites and doing a quick review of them online. The list is updated regularly
  • Prepare and practice your introduction. What do you want the employer to know about you? Which of your skills and past experiences do you want to highlight? Have a short 15-second “sales pitch” ready and make sure to build in some good questions of your own to ask the employer
  • Attend the Career Fair Success workshop to learn how to prepare, what to bring, what to say, and how to follow-up

WHAT YOU SHOULD WEAR

  • Your style of dress may vary according to the type of field you’re considering and the employers you plan to meet with. However, you’ll find that most employers will be wearing business-casual attire, which is a safe bet for you as well. For example, consider wearing pressed slacks or a skirt with a blouse, sweater, or collared shirt.

THE DAY OF THE FAIR

  • Bring 5-10 copies of your well-prepared resumes to the fair
  • Arrive early to interact with employers
  • Greet employers with a smile, handshake, and introduce yourself
  • Collect business cards
  • Send a thank you note to interested employers you talked with
  • Lockers or storage facilities are not available; to increase the ease with which you can move through the fair, we recommend trying to minimize what you bring with you
  • Please bring your Husky card and have it ready for check-in purposes

ATTENDING EMPLOYERS (last updated 4.12.18 – check back often!)

  • C+C – Seeking Assistant Account Executive, Account Executive, Social Good Ambassadors, Internships (Full-Time, Part-Time, Intern)
  • Collabera – Seeking Account Manager (Full-Time)
  • Genie, A Terex Brand–  Seeking Marketing Coordinator, Account Specialist (Full-Time)
  • Hershey Company, The – Seeking Retail Sales Representatives (Full-Time and Intern)
  • Insight Global – Seeking Recruiter/Account Manager (Full-Time)
  • KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation – Seeking Broadcast Engineer, New Producer, Video Tape Editor (Full-Time or Part-Time) and Interns
  • KSTW-TV – Seeking Summer Creative Internship (Paid Internship) and Account Executive (Full-Time)
  • Mockingbird Marketing – Seeking Marketing Manager and Account Managers (Full-Time and Intern)
  • New Engen – Seeking Partner Success Specialist (Full-Time) and Creative Production Intern
  • Norwegian American, The – Seeking Editorial Intern, Assistant Editor (Part-Time)
  • Novinium – Seeking Marketing Intern
  • Philadelphia Insurance Companies – Seeking Marketing/Sales Associate (Full-Time), Seasonal Intern
  • Portage Bay Cafe – Seeking General Support Staff (Part-Time) and Social Media Intern
  • PRR, Inc – Seeking Outreach Interns, Project Coordinator Interns
  • Prudential – Financial Professional Associate (Full-Time), Marketing Assistant (Part-Time), Marketing & Recruiting Intern
  • Raffetto Herman Strategic Communications – Seeking PR interns, Assistant Account Executives and Account Executives (Part-Time & Full-Time)
  • Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits, LLC – Seeking Marketing and Communications roles (Full-Time and Intern)
  • State Farm Mutual Insurance Company – Seeking Agent Aspirant and Insurance & Financial Services Sales Representative (Full-Time, Part-Time and Intern)
  • Wild Gravity – Seeking Production Intern, Post-Production Intern, Marketing/Graphic Design Intern
  • Wyndham Vacation Ownership – Seeking Community Marketing Agent, In House Marketing Agent (Full-Time and Intern)

Questions? Contact ccsevent@uw.edu

Small group career coaching for humanities and social science students

This quarter the Career and Internship Center will be piloting small group career coaching specifically for Arts and Sciences students.

Small group career coaching provides personalized support from a career coach with the added benefit of learning from your peers. These one time, 45 minute sessions are capped at 8-10 students and offer a combination of hands on activities and the opportunity to ask questions and gain advice on a variety of career topics including how to find a job that interests you, what to expect in interviews, and how to translate your UW skills to the working world.

There will be two sessions specifically for Humanities and Social Sciences students in Padelford Hall. Grab a friend and kickstart your career exploration! (Note, to register you’ll need to log into your UW email through Gmail):

Week Two Small Group Career Coaching: Monday, April 2nd from 3:30-4:15 in Padelford B11

Registration here: https://goo.gl/forms/40365dPJohCqu6QS2

Week Three Small Group Career Coaching: Monday, April 9th from 3:30-4:15 in Padelford B11

Registration here: https://goo.gl/forms/wazmzAkmcoXaWURn1

If the sessions fill up, don’t worry! There will be more small group coaching sessions in locations across campus throughout spring quarter. To get on a waitlist or for any questions, please email CAITLIN GOLDBAUM at goldbauc@uw.edu.

Gear up for the 2018 Spring Job & Internship Fair that is on April, 11th

Thinking about going to the Job and Internship fair, but not sure what exactly to do there or worried that you are not ready? Don’t worry the Career and Internship Center has your back. Please see the following information about the resources to get prepared.

FIRST STEP TO SUCCESS AT THE FAIR – DECIDING TO GO!  WELL DONE, YOU.   NEXT STEP? BE SURE YOU’RE READY TO IMPRESS ONCE YOU’RE THERE!

  • Do your research – Use this app to research organizations and find out who they’re looking for and what they’re hiring needs are. What do recruiters tell us is a big pet peeve? Being approached and asked “so uhhh – what does [fill in the blank company] do?”
  • Come dressed the part – We encourage you to choose business casual attire for the Fair. What’s business casual all about?  Learn more by clicking here.
  • Brush up your resume – we can help!  We offer Resume Resources online, and also personal 1:1 resume review services through our Same Day Sessions (Tues – Fri from 10a-4p), online resume review for undergrads, and a day totally devoted to getting you resume-ready: April 10th’s ResumeFest.
  • Once you’ve got your resume ready, be sure to bring it with you – Come prepared to hand a copy to each employer of interest; a general rule of thumb if you don’t have a particular list of employers of interest is to bring along 20.
  • And submit it to the Spring Job & Internship Fair Resume Book in HuskyJobs – resumes submitted to the book will be made available to select employers in advance of the fair, giving your resume additional visibility with employers. Just log into your HuskyJobs account and look for “Opt-In Resume Books” under the “Documents tab”.
  • Consider attending one of our Career Fair Success Workshops – hosted in-person at the Career & Internship Center or virtually online from wherever you are through the Zoom platform. Details on our calendar.
  • Check out our career fair prep tips.
And remember – while many Huskies find a great job or internship at a UW career fair, a fair definitely isn’t the way all of us ultimately find a gig.  Not finding positions that interest you, or not hearing back from the employers you apply to?  Come see us and we can help you strategize about your search, prep your materials and be ready for the next opportunity.

Careers in Healthcare for All Majors – employer panel

When you think about a career in healthcare, doctors and nurses might be the first careers you think of, but there are hundreds of other healthcare careers that don’t require a medical or health-related degree.
Join us for an Employer Panel about “Careers in Healthcare for All Majors” on April 6th.  Learn about what employers look for when hiring, and gain a better understanding of how to conduct your job search in a more effective and strategic way. Gain insight, ask questions, and network with a variety of employers from heath related fields. Attending employers are:

 

·         COPE Health Solutions

·         Fred Hutch (Tentative)

·         PhysAssist Scribes

·         UW Medicine

·         Washington Health Care Authority

 

Careers In Healthcare for All Majors 
Thursday, April 6th, 2016
4:30-6:30 pm; HUB # 332

 

No need to pre-register. Please do arrive early as seats are limited.  Questions? Email Donna Chen at ccsevent@uw.edu  or call 206-543-0535. We look forward to seeing you at this fun event!

For all other upcoming “Careers In…”Employer Panel events, please click HEREAlso, don’t forget to check out other upcoming spring quarter workshops and events at the Career Center by visiting our online calendar at http://careers.uw.edu/Calendar .

 

Have a great weekend!

Best wishes,

The Career Center

Job shadowing – with Huskies@Work

Huskies@Work

During the month of May, students and Puget Sound area alums will join together for a day-in-the-life on the job—with Huskies@Work!

Students, you’ll get the chance to see what your dream job is really like.  Just share your interests on the application form—we’ll make a match that’s just right for you (check out the FAQs section for more details about matching). After a match is made, you’ll work together with your alumni-match to find a day in the month of May that works well for both of your schedules.

The application deadline is Friday, April 8.  Produced by the UW Alumni Association

Information and application at http://www.washington.edu/alumni/huskiesatwork/

The career advice no one tells you

“#1: Job Requirements are Negotiable”

Yes, they are!  Don’t be afraid to apply for jobs or internships for which you have some — but not all — of the listed qualifications.  Think about what the job itself will entail, and then use your cover letter to persuade the employer that you are still the right person for the job!

———————–

The career advice no one tells you

   – by Raghav Haran

Most people have “okay” jobs. We go to work, do what we have to do from 9 to 5, come back home, maybe hang out with friends, and do it all over again the next day. There’s nothing wrong with this.

But some people perform at a totally different level. They’re the people who land executive level positions by their early 30s while everyone else is still trying to “work their way up.” They’re the people who jump out of bed every morning, excited about the day ahead while everyone else drags themselves out of bed every Monday. They’re the people who impact thousands of people through their work, while everyone else keeps themselves busy with pointless tasks at work.

Here’s what they understand, that most people don’t.

1. Job requirements are negotiable

I remember going to the grocery store with my (Indian) grandfather when I was a kid.  He would always look closely at the price of everything we put in our basket. And when we got to the cash register, he would do what I thought was the most embarrassing thing ever: he would try and negotiate with the cashier! But the crazy thing is… it usually worked.

Noah Kagan (founder of AppSumo) has this thing he calls the “coffee challenge.” Basically you walk into a coffee shop, order whatever it is you want, and when it comes time to pay, ask for 10% off. If the cashier asks why, say “just cause.” Most of the time, the cashier will just give it to you.

There are so many things in life that we think are “non-negotiable,” but in reality, we can totally get around it. For example, I applied for a business development role once that required 3–5 years of experience and I had almost zero (I was still in school at the time).

So I decided to prove to them that I could still bring value. Instead of submitting my resume and sitting back, I decided to go out and pitch some companies on forming partnerships with them, and introduced those companies to the hiring manager. I got the offer.

When I was applying for a product design position at Quora, I ran a usability test on the mobile app, mocked up some design suggestions, and sent it to the head of product design.

He emailed me back the same day to schedule an interview.

Apart from jobs in academic professions, like medicine or law, job requirements are largely negotiable — you just have to prove that you can bring value to the table.

People who aren’t willing to “break the rules” a little bit usually end up wasting years of time and money trying to achieve a goal they could’ve achieved with a lot less.

2. Imposter syndrome is a good thing

The New York Times came out with this article a while ago, examining why people from certain groups do better than others economically.  It may not be politically correct to say it, but the truth is that Asian people are more successful than everyone else on average.

“Indian-Americans earn almost double the national figure (roughly $90,000 per year in median household income versus $50,000). Iranian-, Lebanese- and Chinese-Americans are also top-earners.” — New York Times

The biggest reason for this, according to the New York Times, is cultural. The groups that are more successful than others have 3 common characteristics:

  • A superiority complex
  • Some insecurity, or a feeling that you’re not good enough at what you do
  • Impulse control

The combination of believing that you can get to almost wherever you want to be, having discipline, and having insecurity about where you are is the formula for a successful, impactful career.

Embrace that feeling of inadequacy.

3. What’s “realistic” is just an illusion

What’s realistic for you is entirely predicated on what you’ve been exposed to.

When I was younger, I had some friends from lower income backgrounds whose families didn’t receive a high education. When they found out over time that my dad was a doctor, they’d be like “Whoa, that’s amazing!!!” like it was some insanely big thing. In their mind, becoming a doctor was unrealistic. It was only because they didn’t know how.

If someone told me that they wanted to be a doctor, I would think that’s a totally achievable goal. It’s because I know what it takes to get into medical school, the process behind the scenes, and I had been around people who have successfully done it.

There are so many things in life you take for granted that someone else would think is crazy and unrealistic.

Getting a graduate degree? There’s a guy somewhere whose family never went to college, and he thinks that’s unrealistic.

Working for a Fortune 500 company? There’s a girl somewhere whose family works in minimum wage jobs, and she thinks that’s unrealistic.

Running a multi-million dollar business? There’s a kid somewhere who comes from an upper-middle-class background, and he thinks that’s unrealistic.

Work alongside the best in your field, read their books, listen to their interviews, study what they did to get where they are — and eventually, those crazy unrealistic dreams will become realistic for you.

4. Don’t pick a career based on “average salaries” or employment numbers

When you’re striving to be great at what you do, the “averages” don’t matter.

I laugh when people say things like “writers don’t make money.” I’ve earned a good mid-5-figures on the side over the last several months from a few blog posts and emails alone, helped hundreds of people find jobs they love, and built an audience of 6,000+ people.

And I’m definitely not the only one.

When it comes to any field, the people who strive to be great have more than enough money and success. And everyone else fights over scraps.

We see the same thing in engineering — the best programmers get hired by companies like Google, but others trying to cash in on the “gold rush” of tech by looking through some online learn-to-code tutorials in a few weeks aren’t doing as well.

Do what you enjoy doing, and be great at it. Everything else will come.

5. Pick a boss, not a company

People think that if they just get a job at a company like Facebook or Goldman Sachs, then they’ll be set for life. Not true. Having the right mentor is the real key.

Not only will you learn a ridiculous amount just by being around successful people in your field, you’ll also get into their “inner circle” if you can prove that you’re legit. And then you will have more opportunities than ever before.

For example, I worked with New York Times bestselling author Ramit Sethi, he was willing to refer me to powerhouses in his own network. It’s how I got job offers from some of the biggest marketing companies in the world.

Or they might even nudge you away from mistakes that could have cost you years of wasted time and effort.

A while ago I was considering working for someone, and one of my mentors (a well-known figure in Silicon Valley) told me I shouldn’t.

That one email probably saved me months or even years of time going down the wrong path.

Surrounding yourself with the right people could lead to more opportunities than any company could ever give you. And you’ll avoid the mistakes that keep others stuck for years on end.

6. Don’t be afraid to take a pay cut for the right experience

Stanley Druckenmiller, a hedge fund manager, once said this:

“If you’re early on in your career and they give you a choice between a great mentor or higher pay, take the mentor every time. It’s not even close. And don’t even think about leaving that mentor until your learning curve peaks.

There’s just nothing to me so invaluable in my business, but in many businesses, as great mentors. And a lot of kids are just too short-sighted in terms of going for the short-term money instead of preparing themselves for the longer term.” — Stanley Druckenmiller

Literally every single old person says that the biggest mistake young people make is being impatient.

They optimize for the short term (i.e. a job at a big company that will impress their friends and family) instead of thinking about their long term goals.

Don’t be afraid to take one step back today to take two steps forward tomorrow.

7. What got you to level one won’t get you to level two

In the beginning of your career, your technical skills matter the most. You get tested on how well you can use excel, or write code, or design products, etc. But as time goes on, those technical skills start to matter less. How you interact with people starts to matter a lot more.

Most people think that if they just get good enough at their craft, then everything will be fine. And it’s true, being good at what you do does matter.

But you need much more than that. You need to know how to navigate the world of office politics. You need to figure out how to add value outside of your role.

You need to figure out what your company needs, and give it to them—even if they don’t tell you what it is.

8. The real education begins after college

It’s sad how many people think they’re “done with studying” the moment they leave school. In reality, everything you’ve learned in class is largely worthless in the real world.

Successful people read as much as one book a week sometimes. They listen to podcasts. They go to conferences. They read research papers. They talk to other people who are doing big things.

That’s how they’re able to “connect the dots” between seemingly unrelated subjects, and use that insight to land more opportunities. That’s how they see the world through a different lens than everyone else.

9. Always be getting more exposure

“Exposure is leverage.” — Gary Vaynerchuk

After you accomplish anything professionally, get online and write about it. Help someone who was once in your shoes trying to figure things out.

Exposure builds credibility. The bigger the audience you have, the more people will take you seriously.

10. Don’t outsource your success to your company

A prominent venture capitalist in Silicon Valley once decided to work at a coffee shop for a month.

Imagine that. Here was an insanely successful CEO standing behind a cash register. He was taking people’s orders and serving them coffee.

Most people would never even think about doing such an “unglamorous” job.

But he wanted to learn about the operations of the shop from the inside. He wanted to understand the logistics, the systems, the bottlenecks, the inefficiencies, how often customers show up, and more.

Most people think that working at a place like McDonald’s or Starbucks is objectively bad, while working at a big brand name company is objectively good in terms of getting future success.

But in reality, a company is only as good as you make it.

For someone who worked at McDonald’s to study the operations of the business, the logistics, managements strategies, etc to open a franchise business later on, working at a fast food joint would be an incrediblyvaluable experience.

On the other hand, someone who expects to be “set for life” after getting a job at a brand name company is probably screwed.

No job is objectively good or bad. It’s what you make of it.

11. The real winners never go through the “front door”

Alex Banayan said it best:

“[All highly successful people] treat life, business, and success… just like a nightclub.

There are always three ways in.

There’s the First Door, where 99% of people wait in line,hoping to get in.

There’s the Second Door, where billionaires and royalty slip through.

But then there is always, always… the Third Door. It’s the entrance where you have to jump out of line, run down the alley, climb over the dumpster, bang on the door a hundred times, crack open the window, and sneak through kitchen. But there’s always a way in.

Whether it’s how Bill Gates sold his first piece of software, or how Steven Spielberg became the youngest director at a major studio in Hollywood — they all took the Third Door.” —  Alex Banayan

No one gets extraordinary opportunities by taking the same approach everyone else takes.

It’s amazing to me how many people want to land their dream jobs, jobs that thousands of people are competing for, yet they expect to get them by submitting a resume online. That’s not how it works.

The name of the game is noticing the ‘unspoken rules’ around you, and giving people what they want before they have to ask you.

That’s how you win.

Raghav Haran is a marketer and entrepreneur. After working with New York Times bestselling authors, well known entrepreneurs, and other top tier companies, he founded Land Any Job You Want to help other ambitious people land great job offers. This post originally appeared on Medium.

This article from http://qz.com/640112/the-career-advice-no-one-tells-you/?utm_source=atlfb

Amazon Catalyst Grants info session

 

To all UW Arts & Sciecnes Majors: do you have a great idea?

Need some $$$$ to make it come to fruition? See below…

 comotion

Info session + food this Thursday, Feb 18th

 

Dear UW College of Arts & Sciences students,

Do you have a Big Idea? Come and learn about Amazon Catalyst! 

Amazon Catalyst is a new a program supported by Amazon.com, CoMotion and the Office of Research to fund bold, disruptive, solution-focused projects proposed by members of the UW community.  Grants will be awarded for projects that take place over a period of several months to up to two years, and will range from $10,000 to $100,000 each (yes, you read that right – we’re awarding up to $100,000 per project).  All you need is an idea for how to solve a big problem in the world, and the passion to make it a reality.  UW students, faculty and staff from *all* disciplines are encouraged to apply.

Want to learn more?  We will be hosting two information sessions for students who wish to learn about this exciting funding opportunity:

Thursday, February 18, 3:30-5:00 p.m.
Art Building, Room ART 003

After a quick introduction and Q&A, you’ll have the opportunity to chat with other students and Catalyst representatives. Food and refreshments will be provided.

To find out more about the Program, visit the Amazon Catalyst website at catalyst.amazon.com.

BE BOUNDLESS

Winter quarter English mentor lunch

English Department- Winter 2016 Mentor Lunch

Wednesday, February 24th, 12:30 p.m.

UW Club Colleen Room

RSVP REQUIRED: write to Nancy Sisko at nsisko@uw.edu.

babak

Babak Parviz was born and raised in Tehran, Iran where he developed a passion for literature and Persian culture. When he enrolled at Sharif University of Tehran, however, he opted to pursue a B.S. in Electronics. Babak then moved to the University of Michigan where he studied the emerging field of microsystems at one of the only institutions with the resources to move past MEMS theory and into the lab. He is now a leading researcher in microengineering and a testimony to how the humanities can enrich research in science and technology.

Babak created a contact lens that monitors blood sugar for people with diabetes and directed the team that created Google Glass. He was passionate about these projects because they allowed him to not only take the next historic steps in the evolution of technology but also to improve people’s lives.

After taking a position at UW’s College of Engineering well into his career, Babak made the decision to enroll in classes and pursue a B.A. in English, a subject he always wished he had more time to study. He is particularly interested in late 19th– and early 20th-century American writers. According to Babak, his love for the liberal arts has helped him take a different approach to solving problems in the tech industry. Babak accepted a position at Amazon in 2014 and currently lives in Seattle with his family.

Diversity Career Fair

Don’t forget: tonight is the annual Diversity Career Fair.  See the list of featured employers who’ll be attending at http://students.washington.edu/uwnsbe/corporate/2016_Employers.pdf.

Even if you are not ready to look for a job, this is a great chance to network and to see what’s out there!

—————————–

Diversity Career Fair
When Tuesday, January 26, 2016, 5:30 – 8:30 PM
Campus location Student Union Building (HUB) Ballrooms
The fair attracts hundreds of local and national employers from business & industry, the non-profit sector and government agencies.We expect the 2016 Diversity Career Fair to be a huge success for employers and students and invite you to take advantage of this opportunity to come and interact with the employers.

Bay-area Student Career Trek, spring break

Your Bay Area adventure awaits!

Thinking about what to do after college? Make your Spring Break count, while
discovering lively San Francisco, by joining us for a Bay Area Student
Career Trek, March 20?23!

On this 3-day career trek, you?ll expand your Husky community, visit some of
the world?s most cutting-edge companies and connect with UW alums who are
excited to help you explore Bay Area careers.

From lodging to meals to tours, we?ll do the work for you. Hotel
accommodations, ground transportation and all but two meals are included.
There?s even
an option for us to arrange your flight for you!

Applications are due Feb. 1. Learn more and apply for the Bay Area Student
Career Trek today.

call to action

Questions? There will be three information sessions at the HUB from 1:30?2
p.m. on January 21, 25 and 29. Go to UWalum.com/careertrek for more info!

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206-543-0540
uwalumni@uw.edu

Winter Career Center events & workshops

*January 20th , 2016***

*12:30-1:20pm, Career Center Lobby*

*Employer Led Workshop: Professional Communication (presented by City Year)*

In your job search, Professional Communication matters ? from your resumes to your interview to your emails, your ability to communicate like a professional can catapult you to the top of the pile?.or leave you lagging behind. Come hear from City Year recruiters how to communicate professionally and advance your job or internship search goals.

*January 27^th , 2016*

*12:30-1:20pm, Career Center Lobby*

*Employer Led Workshop: Financial Planning (presented by KeyBank)*

Not sure you know what?s what when it comes to financial planning? Wondering how to make sense of student loan debt, credit cards, retirement or down payments on that first rental apartment or maybe even a home purchase? Come hear KeyBank recruiters
discuss the importance of financial planning, and what steps large and small you can take now to maintain or achieve financial stability.

*February 3^rd , 2016*

*12:30-1:20pm, Career Center Lobby*

*Employer Led Workshop: Impressing the Recruiter (presented by Target)*

?Impressing the Recruiter? ? such a simple phrase, and yet such a fundamental part of  your job and internship process! The Target recruiting team will be on hand to give you tips, tricks and advice on how to impress a recruiter, stand out from the crowd, and land that dream gig.

*February 10^th , 2016*

*12:30-1:20pm, Career Center Lobby*

*Employer Led Workshop: Acing the Interview (presented by Nordstrom)*

**

The search for a great internship is on, and you need to be ready to rock the interview process! Learn straight from the team at Nordstrom how to prepare for an interview in 3-4 steps – with fun fashion visuals included!
1. Dressing to Impress
2. Preparation before the interview
3. Using examples of past employment and school assignments within the interview
process
4. Focusing on your strengths and how to implement them into your answers

 

 

Career Fellows Program

Want a resolution that is easy to keep? How about amplifying your career readiness for 2016? We have a great way to do that: **the 2016 A&S Humanities Career Fellows <https://artsci.washington.edu/content/humanities-career-fellows-program>, a 1-credit professionalization program.

Add codes are available by emailing c2c@uw.edu. Make sure you include your name and student number. All juniors and seniors majoring in English and Comp Lit are welcome to join. More info at:

*2016 A&S Humanities Career Fellows
<https://artsci.washington.edu/content/humanities-career-fellows-program>*

Space is still available for both the Thursday and Friday sections?join us!

Best wishes,

Matt

*MATT ERICKSON*
College to Career Initiatives

UW College of Arts & Sciences

UW Campus Box 353765

Communications Building, Room 050
206.221.4506 / fax 206.543.5462
c2c@uw.edu <mailto:c2c@uw.edu>/ www.artsci.washington.edu
<http://www.artsci.washington.edu/>

English alumnus mentor lunch – RSVP now

Every quarter we set up a lunch  for 8 lucky English majors with a former English major that is doing something really  interesting  with their degree. This quarter we have lunch with Babak Parviz.

To RSVP for a spot at the table, e-mail Nancy Sisko: nsisko@uw.edu.

—————————–

English Department- Winter 2016 Mentor Lunch

Wednesday, February 24th, 12:30 p.m.

UW Club Colleen Room

babak

Babak Parviz was born and raised in Tehran, Iran where he developed a passion for literature and Persian culture. When he enrolled at Sharif University of Tehran, however, he opted to pursue a B.S. in Electronics. Babak then moved to the University of Michigan where he studied the emerging field of microsystems at one of the only institutions with the resources to move past MEMS theory and into the lab. He is now a leading researcher in microengineering and a testimony to how the humanities can enrich research in science and technology.

Babak created a contact lens that monitors blood sugar for people with diabetes and directed the team that created Google Glass. He was passionate about these projects because they allowed him to not only take the next historic steps in the evolution of technology but also to improve people’s lives.

After taking a position at UW’s College of Engineering well into his career, Babak made the decision to enroll in classes and pursue a B.A. in English, a subject he always wished he had more time to study. He is particularly interested in late 19th– and early 20th-century American writers. According to Babak, his love for the liberal arts has helped him take a different approach to solving problems in the tech industry. Babak accepted a position at Amazon in 2014 and currently lives in Seattle with his family.

Employer Mock Interviews

Employer Mock Interviews
Wednesday, January 13, 2016, 4:30 – 5:30 PM -OR- 5:40 – 6:40

The 4:30-5:30pm session is full. Please consider registering for the 5:40-6:40pm session, or you are welcome to submit your resume to get on the 4:30pm waitlist.

Please register for a waitlist spot and submit your resume HERE!

Questions? Please email ccsevent@uw.edu or call 206-543-0535.

Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Do interviews make you nervous? If you’ve already attended the Career Center’s Interviewing Getting Started workshop and Interviewing Lab, the next best way for undergraduate students of all majors to prepare is to practice with an employer! Sign up for the chance to put your interviewing skills into action by practicing with and receiving feedback from a Husky-friendly employer in a group interview format.

The Employer Mock Interview is an hour long session, where students will have the opportunity to practice general interview skills with employers in an interview setting. Employers will be asking interview questions for 40-minutes following by a 20 minute debriefing. Don’t miss out on this opportunity!

There are two sessions available, and seats are very limited (One slot per student ONLY). Please register for a spot by filling out the Catalyst and you will receive a confirmation within 2-3 days.

The 4:30-5:30pm session is full. Please consider registering for the 5:40-6:40pm session, or you are welcome to submit your resume to get on the 4:30pm waitlist.

Career Center workshops:

CareersInDraft

WINTER QUARTER 2016

Careers In Non-Profits
Thursday, January 21, 2016
4:30-6:30pm, HUB # 334

Would you like to embark on a career that serves a greater good?  Do you want a vocation that works for a cause that is meaningful and provides a strong sense of self-gratification?  Then please join us for a panel discussion focused on careers in the non-profit industry.  Hear from a group of employers who will offer advice on how to find jobs and internships in a variety of non-profit work settings.  Learn about what employers look for in a resume and cover letter, and gain a better understanding of how to conduct your job search in a more effective and strategic way.  If you are someone who cares about social justice, affordable housing, environmental sustainability, and other important causes then come for this event and stay afterwards for a chance to speak with the panelists after the discussion. Please check back to see the employers who will be participating.

No need to pre-register. Questions? Please contact The Career Center at ccsevent@uw.edu or call 206-543-0535

Careers In Media and Communications
Thursday,February 11, 2016
4:30-6:30pm, HUB # 332
More details coming soon!

SPRING QUARTER 2016

Careers In Healthcare for All Majors
Wednesday, April 6, 2016
4:30-6:30pm, HUB # 332
More details coming soon!

Careers In International Locations
Wednesday, April 27, 2016
4:30-6:30pm, HUB #332
More details coming soon!

Winter career course for humanities majors (1 credit)

Dear English and Comp Lit Majors,

 

Do you know many companies are looking to hire students that major in the humanities—majors like English and Comp Lit? They are, but you have to take the first step in showing them all your personal skills and strengths. This is true for a number of scenarios: a job after graduation, an internship next summer, and even getting into highly competitive graduate programs. We invite you to build your competencies and better understand your strengths by enrolling in the 2016 A&S Humanities Career Fellows, a 1-credit professionalization program. Add codes are available by emailing c2c@uw.edu – make sure you include your name and student number. All juniors and seniors majoring in English and Comp Lit are welcome to join. More info at:

 

2016 A&S Humanities Career Fellows

 

 

MATT ERICKSON
College to Career Initiatives

UW College of Arts & Sciences

UW Campus Box 353765

Communications Building, Room 050
206.221.4506  /  fax 206.543.5462
c2c@uw.edu  /  www.artsci.washington.edu
Connect with the College of Arts & Sciences:
Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

 

Winter quarter career classes

The Career Center is excited to offer two classes (General Studies 297H & 391G) in Winter 2016, designed to meet the needs of undergraduate students seeking information and inspiration about career options and strategy.  Below are details.

 

Have a great day,

 

Patrick

Career Center, 134 MGH

 

 

******************************************************

 

 

 

General Studies 297H

Title: Career Planning

Schedule: Wednesday, 1:30-3:20

Instructor: Tina Adelstein (Career Counselor)

Credits: 2

Size of class: up to 50 students

SLN: 14809

 

This course assists freshmen and sophomore students (first and second year students with 0-89 credits) with the process of exploring and designing their academic paths and internship/career options. Students will survey their own capacities, skills, and interests through assigned readings, reflections, and in-class activities.

 

General Studies 297H (“Career Planning”), is a 2-credit course (CR/NC) where students attend one 110-minute seminar each week. This course is designed to expose students to various co/extra-curricular campus opportunities and tackle the issue of “what can I do with a major in…”  Students are encouraged to apply their knowledge to make informed choices about possible courses of study, internships, jobs, volunteer/community service activities, and careers.  No pre-requisites are required.

 

Learning objectives:

  1. Build self-awareness and appreciation for one’s strengths, skills, values, and interests and apply this self-knowledge when making decisions and exploring academic and career options.
  2. Explore various academic/career pathways and acquire methods to research them
  3. Hone networking skills
  4. Build, refine, and practice effective application materials and strategies
  5. Clearly position their education and background in the marketplace and develop confidence in choices

Weekly course topics include:

 

  • Reflective practices
  • Decision making and design thinking
  • Dependable Strengths
  • Creative exploration of majors and careers
  • Prototyping and testing ideas
  • UW Young Alumni Panel
  • Resume, cover letter, CV, and application materials
  • Internship Fair Prep
  • Digital identity

 

For additional details please contact Tina Adelstein in the Career Center (tinaiw@uw.edu; 206-685-6216 ).    http://careers.uw.edu/Classes

 

 

General Studies 391G

Title: Career Strategy and Job Search

Tuesday/Thursday, 2:30-3:20; LOW 201

Instructor: Patrick Chidsey (Career Counselor)

Credits: 2

Size of class: up to 50 students

SLN: 14824

 

This course assists juniors/transfer students/seniors (3rd & 4th year students) with self-exploration, investigation of career options and development of career and job search strategy.  General Studies 391G (“Career Strategy and Job Search”), is a graded, 2-credit course where students attend two 50-minute classes each week. This course is designed for juniors, transfer students and seniors (3rd & 4thyear students) who have earned roughly 90 credits or more. No pre-requisites are required.

 

Learning objectives:

  1. Grow self-awareness and appreciation for your strengths, skills, values, and interests and learn how to use this important self-knowledge when taking action in job searching and building a career strategy.
  2. Build ability to effectively research career options and learn how to be successful in the competitive job market.
  3. Learn how to create effective resumes, cover letters, strong LinkedIn profiles (and online and in-person networking skills), grow interviewing skills and confidence.

 

Course topics include:

 

  • Dependable Strengths, Values, Interests
  • Career and Option Exploration
  • Researching Employers and Understanding the Job Market
  • Networking and Informational Interviews
  • Short and Long Term Planning
  • How Does your Major(s) and Experiences Relate to your Future?
  • UW Alumni and Employer Panels
  • Resumes, Cover Letter, Interviewing
  • Social Media, LinkedIn and Online Presence/Digital Footprint

 

For additional details please contact Patrick Chidsey in the Career Center (chidsey@uw.edu; 206.616.5803).  http://careers.uw.edu/Classes

 

 

TOMORROW: Government Career Fair – 2-5pm, MGH Commons

Gov Career Fair 2015 Web Bannersm_0

2015 Government Career Fair
When Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 2 – 5 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Commons
Are you interested in gaining a career opportunity working in a  government setting? Then you will definitely want to attend the Government Career Fair sponsored by the Career Center. We are offering you a great opportunity of interacting and connecting with government employers looking to recruit Huskies for part-time, full-time and internship opportunities. Bring your resumes and come join us!
Note

 Questions? Please contact the Career Center at 206-543-0535 or email ccsevent@uw.edu.

10/27: Government Career Fair

Hello Huskies,

 

We hope you had a fun summer and are recharged for the fall quarter! Are you interested in gaining a career opportunity working in a government setting? Don’t miss the Government Career Fair sponsored by the Career Center.  This event is a great opportunity to interact and connect with government employers looking to recruit Huskies for part-time, full-time and internship opportunities. Bring your resumes, dress to impress, and come join us for this fun event!

 

Government Career Fair

Tuesday, October 27th, 2-5pm

Mary Gates Hall, Commons

Open to all students and alumni from all 3 campuses

Please click here for a list of attending employers

 

Questions? Please email ccsevent@uw.edu or call 206-543-0535. We look forward to seeing you in Mary Gates Hall on October 27th!

 

Also, don’t forget to check out other upcoming fall quarter workshops and events at the Career Center by visiting our online calendar at http://careers.uw.edu/Calendar.

 

 

Best wishes,

The Career Center

 

 

WED: UW Teacher Education Programs event

Transforming Learning:
UW Teacher Education Programs
When Wednesday, October 21, 2015, 4:30 – 6 PM
Campus location Student Union Building (HUB) room 250
WHAT: Hear from teachers who are UW Alumna about our teacher preparation programs!

WHO: Elementary, Secondary, Special Education & Seattle Teacher Residency programs

WHEN: Weds, Oct 21st, 4:30-6:00pm

WHERE: HUB room 250

Refreshments will be provided

Event sponsors Sponsored by the UW College of Education
Note

Questions? Email Mary Beth Canty at cantymb@uw.edu

Teach for America deadline – Fri, 10/30

tfa

TEACH FOR AMERICA

FALL APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, October 30th

Start your application now: www.teachforamerica.org/apply

See the Impact you can have as in the classroom:

Teach For America is developing a movement of leaders who will help drive change at every level of our education system toward the goal of closing the opportunity gap in America. TFA works with outstanding people, trains them to apply their leadership and skills in a classroom, and supports them to empower their students. After two years, our alumni are change agents, inside and outside of schools, tackling issues in education and beyond.

Basics and Benefits:

Why Teach? | Our Impact | Who We Look For | How to Apply

UW Business Career Fair

Stop by the HUB between 2 and 6pm today to see what kinds of opportunities are out there in business:

 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Attention Huskies!

 

Welcome back to campus! We hope you had a great summer! Have you been looking for the perfect job or internship?  Then, don’t miss the chance to chat with more than 130 employers at annual UW Business Career Fair!  All UW students are welcome.

 

BUSINESS CAREER FAIR

Monday, October 12, 2015

2-6pm, HUB Ballrooms

Open to all UW students and alumni!

 

Attending employers are looking to hire a variety of majors for internships, part-time or full-time career opportunities. The one thing they all have in common?  They’re looking to hire Huskies!

 

Companies include: Accenture, Amazon,  Anheuser Busch, Bloomberg, Boeing, Capital One, Concur, Deloitte Consulting, Hitatchi, Honeywell, KeyBank, Lands’ End,  Tableau, Wells Fargo, Weyerhaeuser and many more! See attached link for employer list.

http://tinyurl.com/UWBizCareerFair15

 

Get a head start on your competition by researching the companies on the list.  Be sure to come dressed to impress and bring copies of your resumes!

 

Questions? Contact bizhire@uw.edu

#BCF15

 

 

Andy Rabitoy

Director, Undergraduate Career Services

Michael G. Foster School of Business • University of Washington

Dempsey Hall Room 212 • Box 353223 • Seattle, WA 98195-3200

T: 206.221.8142 •  arabitoy@uw.edu   •  foster.washington.edu/ugcareers

 

 

 

 

Careers in the Tech Industry for All Majors

Hello Huskies,

 

We hope you are well and the quarter is going nicely so far. Are you interested in working for a tech company but aren’t a computer science student? Join us to learn about the hundreds of jobs in tech companies for non-tech majors! Hear from a panel of employers (DocuSign, Expedia, Google, Payscale) about what those jobs are and how to apply for them. Come for the panel and stay for time to mingle and talk with panelists after the event.

 

Careers in the Tech Industry for All Majors
Thursday, October 22nd, 2015
4:30-6:30pm; HUB # 214

 

No need to pre-register. Please do arrive early as seats are limited.  Questions? Email ccsevent@uw.edu or call 206-543-0535. We look forward to seeing at this fun event!

 

For all other upcoming “Careers In…”Employer Panel events, please click HERE.  Also, don’t forget to check out other upcoming fall quarter workshops and events at the Career Center by visiting our online calendar at http://careers.uw.edu/Calendar .

 

Best wishes,

The Career Center

 

 

Monday: Job Search for Seniors – 3-4pm

 

Meetup – Job Search for Seniors
When Monday, October 5, 2015, 3 – 4 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Commons
Graduating in the next few quarters? We’ll be discussing all of your questions around when and how to start the job search! Seniors—come as you are with or without questions.

Get valuable feedback and advice ( and build connections) from a Career Counselor and other students in one of our Career Meetups. Casual (but productive) conversations, just for UW undergraduates! To find your Career Meetups, look for the Purple Balloon!

Cost Free
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Attention Pre-Law Students:

Hello,

My name is Taylor Deardorff, and I’m President of UW Mock Trial. Mock Trial is a undergraduate competitive activity with over 650 teams across
the nation, and our team is one of the best–we are currently ranked in the top 10. Mock Trial builds public speaking, research, debate,
writing, and teamwork skills, and is open to students with majors across the disciplines. We are looking for new members to join the club for
the upcoming year and we would be very grateful if you could send out the following message to whatever listserv or mailing list you might
have.

Thank you so much!  Here is the info:

Subject line: Travel. Compete. Win. Join the UW Mock Trial legacy.

Body: Seize your opportunity to earn a spot on UW Mock Trial’s team, UW’s most successful RSO.

As a member of UW Mock Trial, you will…

Travel.
You’ll see the country with UW Mock Trial. This year alone we’ll be traveling to NYU in New York City, Vanderbilt in Nashville, and UCLA in
Los Angeles. Past years we’ve explored Orlando, Yale, Washington DC, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Memphis, Arizona, and Berkeley.

Compete.
Tap into your inner competitor. Mock Trial is a team-based competition set in a courtroom, governed by the rules and facts of a complex legal
case. While you’re perfecting your public speaking skills, adopting a new persona as a witness, and transforming into a power attorney, you’ll
be building friendships and having fun. No experience is necessary and you don’t have to be pre-law; all you need is passion and a competitive
spirit, we’ll teach you the rest.

Win.
UW Mock Trial has a history of excellence. This past season, we finished Second in the nation at the National Championship (right behind Yale
University). Out of 650 teams in the country, we’re ranked #10. You’ll compete head-to-head with the best schools around the country, and you
won’t come up short. If you hate losing, you’ve found your place.

Build a network of friends and teammates. Build your resume. Build your skills.

Join us for an information session on October 6th or 7th at 6:00 in Sieg Hall, Room 225, to learn more and schedule your tryout. Find us at
www.uwmocktrial.com, @UWMockTrial, or email us at uwmt@uw.edu.

 

Scholarship & Fellowship Fair – save the date!

Mark your calendars for October 29th:

——————————–
scholarshipfair

Fair Schedule

Save the Date

October 29, 2015

Mary Gates Hall Commons

10:00am-2:00pm

Program representatives from UW, local and national organizations, agencies, departments, etc. will be hosting tables throughout the MGH Commons. Stop by to talk with them about their scholarship programs!

More details will be available in the fall!

Teach For America deadline: 9/10

 

Teach For America is developing a movement of leaders who will help drive change at every level of our education system toward the goal of closing the opportunity gap in America. TFA works with outstanding people, trains them to apply their leadership and skills in a classroom, and supports them to empower their students. After two years, our alumni are change agents, inside and outside of schools, tackling issues in education and beyond.

See the Impact you can have as a Teacher:

  • Our mission in a nutshell (2min video)
  • Bring your passion into the classroom (1min video)
Basics and Benefits:

Why Teach? |Our Impact | Who We Look For| How to Apply

Fulbright US Student Porgram – last online info session 7/24

If you have students interested in applying for the Fulbright US Student Program this year, we have one more online information session scheduled for students looking to get started on applying now. Please share widely as the Fulbright program is open to rising seniors, recent grads and alumni, graduate and professional students in all fields. This year’s application cycle is for grants funding research, graduate study, English teaching, creative arts projects and other experiences abroad in 2016-17.

 

Last UW general information session during this application cycle:

 

Once registered, participants will receive info about how to log in to attend the session online, and are welcome to join us from wherever they are this summer!

 

Further details about the Fulbright US Student Program are also included below. Additional information is also available on our website.

 

Thank you,

 

Robin Chang

Associate Director

Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards

Center for Experiential Learning and Diversity

University of Washington

171 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352803

Seattle, WA 98195-2803

206-543-2603   FAX:  206-616-4389

http://expd.washington.edu/scholarships

 

FULBRIGHT US STUDENT PROGRAM

 

Are you currently a junior, senior, graduate or professional student or a recent bachelor’s, master’s or JD graduate looking for a fully-funded abroad experience during the 2016-17 academic year? Consider the Fulbright U.S. Student Program (http://us.fulbrightonline.org/home.html). This program is designed to give students, artists, and other professionals opportunities to pursue research, graduate study, creative projects or English teaching experience in over 155 nations worldwide.

 

The application cycle for the 2016-2017 Fulbright U.S. Student competition is open now. The UW deadline for applications is September 9, 2015.

 

WHAT IS A U.S. STUDENT FULBRIGHT GRANT? 

 

—  It allows for individually designed study/research or an English Teaching Assistantship. You can propose a project and/or study plan that will take place during one academic year in a country outside the U.S.

—  It provides support for study/research/teaching in a single country. (Limited opportunities exist for traveling to more than one country.) You can meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.

—  It facilitates cultural exchange. Through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in daily tasks, you can gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think.

—  It promotes mutual understanding. Through engagement in the community, you can interact with your hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom.

 

ELIGIBILITY

 

To be eligible, you must be:

1) A U.S. citizen,

International students interested in the Fulbright Program must apply through the binational Fulbright Commissions/Foundations or U.S. Embassies. Additional information is available at: http://foreign.fulbrightonline.org/.

2) A graduating senior or hold a B.S./B.A. degree, master’s or doctoral degree candidate, or a young professional or artist,

3) Thinking of studying, teaching or conducting research abroad, and

4) In good health. (Health conditions in some locations may be of concern and may require preventive measures to protect grantees and their families.

 

In addition, medical facilities may be inadequate or unavailable for existing medical problems; this is the reason behind the requirement for a medical exam and medical clearance for a specific assignment.)

 

Complete eligibility details are at http://us.fulbrightonline.org/about/eligibility.

 

PROGRAM DETAILS

—  Awards grants in all fields of study.

—  Awards approximately 1,500 grants for travel to over 155 countries worldwide.

—  Offers one academic year of study, research, or teaching assistantship experience. Projects may include university course work, independent library or field research, or professional training in the arts.

—  Preference is given to candidates who have not had extensive recent experience abroad (excluding undergraduate study abroad) in the country of application.

 

FULBRIGHT PROGRAM ADVISORS AT UW

 

For graduate and professional students or alumni at UW Seattle: Marilyn Gray, megray@uw.edu, G-1 Communications

For undergraduate students or alumni at UW Seattle: Robin Chang, robinc@uw.edu, 171 Mary Gates Hall

UW Bothell students of all levels or alumni: Natalia Dyba, NDyba@uwb.edu, UW1-186

UW Tacoma students of all levels or alumni: Cindy Schaarschmidt, cs65@uw.edu, Mattress Factory

 

Please contact the appropriate advisor above if you have questions or concerns.

 

Next Wednesday: Summer Career Fair!

Next Wednesday!

Even if you are not ready to start your job search, this is a great opportunity to see what’s out there, ask questions of recruiters, and ask for feedback on your resume.

2015 SUMMER CAREER FAIR

  • Wednesday, June 24th
  • 2:00-6:00pm
  • HUB South Ballroom

The Details

  • All UW students & alumni from all 3 campuses can attend
  • Dress code is business casual
  • Info about what to expect is here

Next Steps

  • Get to know the 60 attending employers: Find out what they do, what majors and positions they are looking to recruit. (being knowledgeable about organizations that interest you shows preparation, interest, and professionalism)
  • Submit your resume to the Summer Career Fair Resume Book (even if you can’t attend!): This is a great way to get your resume seen by more employers, and reinforce your interest in specific employers and opportunities.
  • Attend or download our Career Fair Success workshop and/or our Resumes & Cover Letters workshop.
  • Spruce up your resume by using the Same-Day Sessions– The quickest way to visit with a career counselor or trained peer advisor for 15 minutes
  • The Career Center will offer workshops and Same-Day-Sessions until June 26th

 Questions

 

Please bring your resumes and join us at the HUB on June 24th. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Have a fantastic summer!

The Career Center

 

 

 

 

 

————————————–

Donna Chen
Events Coordinator
Direct : (206) 543-9108
chend3@uw.edu

 

Go Dawgs!

The Career Center
University of Washington
main: (206) 543-0535
134 Mary Gates Hall * Box 352810 * Seattle, WA 98195

http://careers.washington.edu
https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/chend3/248092

 

 

 

UW Summer Career Fair – 6/24

Mark your calendars!

————————-
careerfairbanner

WHEN: Wednesday, June 24, 2015
TIME:  2:00 - 6:00
WHERE: HUB South Ballroom
DRESS CODE: Business Casual
Open to all majors and class levels and alumni
from all three UW campuses!

Huskies! Are you about to graduate or an alum looking to land that perfect full-time career position? Or are you an undergraduate student looking to obtain part-time employment or an internship opportunity? Then look no further! The Career Center is hosting the Summer Career Fair just for YOU! This Career Fair will give you the chance to connect and interact with over 70 employers on Seattle campus looking to hire UW Huskies just like you!

Registered employers will be looking to fill jobs and internships in a wide range of industries, including corporate, small business, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Please check out the list of attending employers on our website. Make sure to research those employers you’re interested in meeting with by visiting their websites and doing a quick review of them online and in trade magazines.

http://careers.uw.edu/Students/Summer-Career-Fair

Career Opportunity: Koru @ UW

Dear Arts & Sciences Majors,

 

Are you concerned that you’re not doing enough to prepare for life after graduation? Do you think your resume could use some additions and enhancements? Do you want to be able to explain how your skills and strengths will make you a great addition to any organization?

 

If so, then you should apply to Koru@UW A&S. This summer, we will bring Seattle’s award-winning career prep program, Koru, to campus to help you jump-start your professional development. All A&S majors are encouraged to apply, and there is financial aid available for those who qualify.

 

For more info, see http://www.joinkoru.com/uwcas

 

To apply, go here: http://www.joinkoru.com/apply_uwcas/   Applications are due FRIDAY, JUNE 5th.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me or the team at Koru: uw@joinkoru.com

 

Best wishes,

Matt Erikson

 

 

MATT ERICKSON
Education to Employment Initiatives

Manager / Koru@UW A&S Programs
UW College of Arts & Sciences

UW Campus Box 353765

Communications Building, Room 050
206.221.4506  /  fax 206.543.5462
matteric@uw.edu  /  www.artsci.washington.edu
Connect with the College of Arts & Sciences:
Facebook | Twitter | YouTube

 

 

Resume workshop

 

Resumes – Getting Started
UW Career Center
When Tuesday, June 16, 3:30 – 4 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Summary Not happy with your resume? Let us help! We will discuss format, style, and how to write a resume that best reflects your strengths and talents.
Cost Free
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

“A Top Medical School Revamps Requirements to Lure English Majors”

A Top Medical School Revamps Requirements to Lure English Majors
by Julie Rovner, KUOW.org
You can’t tell by looking which students at Mount Sinai’s school of medicine in New York City were traditional pre-meds as undergraduates and which weren’t. And that’s exactly the point.

Most of the class majored in biology or chemistry, crammed for the medical college admission test and got flawless grades and scores.

But a growing percentage came through a humanities-oriented program at Mount Sinai known as HuMed. As undergraduates, they majored in things like English or history or medieval studies. And though they got good grades, too, they didn’t take the MCAT, because Mount Sinai guaranteed them admission after their sophomore year of college.

Adding students who are steeped in more than just science to the medical school mix is a serious strategy at Mount Sinai.

Dr. David Muller is Mount Sinai’s dean for medical education. One wall of his cluttered office is a massive whiteboard covered with to-do tasks and memorable quotations. One quote reads: “Science is the foundation of an excellent medical education, but a well-rounded humanist is best suited to make the most of that education.”

The HuMed program dates back to 1987, when Dr. Nathan Kase, who was dean of medical education at the time, wanted to do something about what had become known as pre-med syndrome. Schools across the country were worried that the striving for a straight-A report card and high test scores was actually producing sub-par doctors. Applicants — and, consequently, medical students — were too single-minded.

Kase, according to Muller, “really had a firm belief that you couldn’t be a good doctor and a well-rounded doctor — relate to patients and communicate with them — unless you really had a good grounding in the liberal arts.”

So Mount Sinai began accepting humanities majors from a handful of top-flight liberal arts schools after their second year of college. These students are expected to continue to follow their nonscientific interests for the remainder of their college careers.

Mount Sinai takes care of teaching these students the science they need, during the summers. Interestingly, it’s not exactly the same courses that are studied in most pre-med programs.

The usual pre-med sciences — including several semesters of chemistry, physics, and calculus — date from the early 1900s, when an educator named Abraham Flexner revolutionized medical school by turning it into a truly scientific endeavor.

But those core science courses haven’t changed much since Flexner, Muller says, while science has.

“The science for 1910 is only nominally relevant today; yet that’s the filter through which everyone has to come,” he says.

And that filter often weeds out people who could make excellent practitioners. Too frequently, Muller says, “if you can’t get an A-minus in organic chemistry, you’re not going to be a doctor.”

Such artificial barriers “exclude people from medical school that we desperately need,” he says.

Studies have shown that the students in Mt. Sinai’s Humanities in Medicine program are just as successful in medical school as the students who take more science classes in college. And they are slightly more likely to choose primary care or psychiatry as a specialty — both areas of high need.

At a recent end-of-year party thrown by the medical students for professors and administrators, even the teachers had trouble remembering who was a “HuMed” student and who wasn’t.

Someone finally points out Virginia Flatow. She’s a second-year student from New York. She majored in psychology at Bates College in Maine. But she was also on the debate team. That meant lots of traveling to tournaments. Flatow says she would never have been able to do that if she’d been on the classical pre-med track.

“There are very few [medical school] courses — maybe, I can think of one off the top of my head — where doing a lot of science in college helps you,” Flatow says. “The rest of it is just a matter of, ‘How well do you study?’ ”

Flatow agrees with a growing number of medical educators that organic chemistry is largely irrelevant for medical school, and that its difficulty discourages many students.

“I know so many people who took one semester of organic chemistry [and] dropped pre-med,” she says. “My brother was one of them.”

John Rhee, another second-year HuMed student, majored in public policy at Cornell and says he was even thinking about going into hotel management. But he decided to become a doctor after taking a summer job at a hospice.

“The experience was so deep for me,” he says, “partnering with a patient through end-of-life care.”

Keith Love, a first-year HuMed student from Colby College in Maine, says he originally gave himself a “zero percent chance” of going to medical school. He studied environmental science and anthropology in college, and still escapes Manhattan some early mornings to go birding. But, he says, “I thought about what I really wanted to get out of a career — and it was medicine.”

These non-traditional students serve yet another role: They round out what could otherwise be a class full of science wonks.

“I think the cross-fertilization of ideas that goes on … ultimately everyone benefits from it,” says Harsh Chawla, a third-year student from Danville, Calif. He did the traditional pre-med program, majoring in biology at the University of Southern California.

The effort has worked so well, in fact, that Mount Sinai is expanding it, opening it to students in any major from any college or university. Eventually half the class will be admitted via a slightly reconfigured program, which has a new name: FlexMed.

Back in his 13th-floor office, Muller shows visitors his commanding view of the East River and East Harlem, “which is sort of the core community we serve as a medical school.”

And while he describes his own pre-med training as “cookie cutter,” Muller has done his own share of thinking outside the box. Among other things, he is nationally recognized for helping create the nation’s largest academic home-visiting program for patients.

But what would he have pursued in college had he not headed straight to the science track?

He thinks for a moment. “Literature — English lit,” he says, wistfully. “I read voraciously as a kid, and that almost came to a complete standstill in college because there was just no time to breathe.”

Can pursuing different interests really make a better doctor? Of that Muller is confident.

“People who look at the same problems through different lenses will make us better in the long run,” he says. “Now, can I prove that’s going to be the case? No. But I’d like to believe that it is.”

More at http://kuow.org/post/top-medical-school-revamps-requirements-lure-english-majors

UW Summer Career Fair 6/24

Don’t miss the UW’s Summer Career Fair on 6/24!

2015 SUMMER CAREER CAREER FAIR

  • Wednesday, June 24th
  • 2:00-6:00pm
  • HUB South Ballroom

The Details

  • All UW students & alumni from all 3 campuses can attend
  • Dress code is business casual
  • Info about what to expect is here

Next Steps

  • Get to know the employers who are coming (being knowledgeable about organizations that interest you shows preparation, interest, and professionalism)
  • Attend or download our Career Fair Success workshop and/or our Resumes & Cover Letters workshop.
  • Spruce up your resume by using the Same-Day Sessions– The quickest way to visit with a career counselor or trained peer advisor for 15 minutes
  • Submit your resume to the Summer Career Fair Resume Book (even if you can’t attend!)
  • The Career Center will offer workshops and Same-Day-Sessions until June 26th

 Questions

 

  • Please contact the Career Center at 206-543-0535 or email ccsevent@uw.edu

 

Please bring your resumes and come join us at the HUB on June 24th!

 

 

Best wishes on your final exams!

The Career Center

 

————————————–

 

 

Resume workshop

 

Resumes – Getting Started
UW Career Center
When Tuesday, June 2, 3:30 – 4 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Summary Not happy with your resume? Let us help! We will discuss format, style, and how to write a resume that best reflects your strengths and talents.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Type of Event Workshop
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Panel discussion: The Gut to Choose!

The Gut to Choose! 
Who are you? Who do you want to be?!
This is A diverse career panel
inviting gutsy speakers from different backgrounds to show you the possibilities in career paths, the courage to choose what you really want, and the perseverance to fight for it.
We also have several undergraduates from different disciplines to share their stories of struggles, dedication and inspirations.
When
Thursday, May 28th, 7-9pm
Where 
First Floor Common, HUB
––– Panelists ––– 
Wilson Mendieta
Wilson has had a broad performing career inclusive of concert dance, t.v., commercials, voice overs, and the Broadway stage. He now teaches at the University of Washington, and will serve as the Director of the Musical Theater Program beginning the Fall of 2015.
 
Molly Moon
Molly left her job as Executive Director of Music for America to start Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream, and now works to make the world better, one scoop at a time by advocating for worker’s rights, supporting local farms and spreading joy with delicious ice cream.
Geeman Yip 
Geeman left his job at a major computer company to create BitTitan. With his incredible vision and mission, great care of his employees and customers, BitTitan is now one of the fastest growing tech start-ups in Seattle.
 
Rachel Chapman 
Rachel works as an Associate Professor in the University of Washington Anthropology department. She is also an advocate for prenatal care, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, women’s health and development.
 
Di Ye 
Di fearlessly quits her high-tech corporate job and steps into talent development as a professional life and career coach and entrepreneur.
“Sometimes, a stop can be a fresh start for a bigger picture.”
More info

Fall online course: Intro to Sustainable Business for non business majors

Unlike many of the UW online courses, this one carries no additional course fee.  If you are thinking about a career in business or non profit, or starting a business or non profit, this is a good option:

—————————-

ESRM 320, Marketing and Management From a Sustainability Perspective (SLN 14447) is an online course (except for two mandatory in-person exams) that does not charge an additional fee and offers 5 credits, NW, and I&S. Below is overview info, and details are on the website at

Marketing and Management. In ESRM 320, we explore two of the four primary business dimensions: marketing and human resource management (companion course ESRM 321 explores finance and accounting). Marketing refers to promoting, pricing, and distributing new and existing products and services that are aimed at satisfying consumers’ wants, needs, and objectives. Human resource management refers to developing, managing, and motivating human capital and resources.

Sustainability. Refers to integrating environmental, social, and financial elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations. We will explore the meaning and importance of sustainable business practices that respect and adhere to best environmental science methods and ethical social responsibility standards. The context for this exploration will be reviewing corporate sustainability reports.

Learning Objectives (at the end of this course, students should be able to do the following):

  1. Explain the vocabulary, concepts, and models of marketing, human resources, and sustainability
  2. Summarize how a market orientation and commitment to sustainability can enhance customer and employee satisfaction
  3. Describe how consumer markets are segmented, targeted, and products positioned to satisfy individual, government, and business consumers’ wants and needs
  4. Compare techniques for creating value-added products, services, and ideas; valuing environmental and social externalities and managing traditional pricing; developing distribution strategies and “greening” the supply chain; and creating and implementing promotion campaigns
  5. Define managerial and leadership styles and theories of motivation, persuasion, and influence
  6. Summarize the human resource process of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, motivating, and evaluating employees
  7. Describe sustainability reporting and the GRI indicators for measuring sustainability performance
  8. Assess real world sustainability performance using corporate sustainability reports and GRI indicators
  9. Analyze and interpret sustainability performance data
  10. Learn how to use Excel spreadsheets
Dorothy Paun, PhD, MBA
University of Washington
396 Bloedel Hall, Box 352100
Seattle, WA 98195

College of Arts & Sciences Koru (Career) Info Session

College of A&S and Koru Info Session
When Wednesday, May 20, 2 – 3 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
The University of Washington College of Arts & Sciences is teaming up with Koru, a college-to-career accelerator program, to host a two-week intensive, to align your individual strengths and academic career to the work world, gain real experience, and develop the skills that will make you stand out to employers. Koru@UW A&S will accelerate your trajectory no matter what you want to do after college.

Hear firsthand accounts of Koru@UW alum, and learn about the UW benefits exclusively offered to students participating in Koru@UW A&S summer programs. www.joinkoru.com…

Event sponsors Sponsored by the College of Arts & Sciences and Koru
Note

Questions? Email matteric@uw.edu

Job Search for Seniors – Thursday at 3:30pm

 

Job Search for Seniors
UW Career Center
When Thursday, May 14, 3:30 – 4:30 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) Commons
Graduating in the next few quarters? We’ll be discussing all of your questions around when and how to start the job search! Seniors—come as you are with or without questions.

Get valuable feedback and advice ( and build connections) from a Career Counselor and other students in one of our Career Meetups. Casual (but productive) conversations, just for UW undergraduates! To find your Career Meetups, look for the Purple Balloon!

Type of Event Workshop
Cost Free
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Education to Employment

PUT YOUR MAJOR TO WORK.

 

UW College of Arts & Sciences and Koru, a college-to-career program, will help you translate what you’ve learned in college to real professional experience.

 

CONNECT COLLEGE TO YOUR CAREER.

 

Want all the benefits of a summer internship…in 2 short weeks? UW and Koru are hosting a summer job prep program for students in the College of Arts and Sciences. You’ll work on real projects for real companies and walk away with hands-on job experience. You’ll also expand your network for future summer job or internship opportunities. It’s a win-win. Join us!

For more information, see: http://www.joinkoru.com/uwcas

To apply to the program and save your place, go here: http://www.joinkoru.com/apply_uwcas/

Earlybird deadline = May 18th

 

WHAT YOU’LL GET:

 

  • Skills
  • Experience
  • Mentorship
  • Network

 

UPCOMING INFO SESSIONS @ UW CAREER CENTER, MGH 134

 

Tuesday                              May 12th, 2-3pm

Wednesday                         May 20th, 2-3pm

Thursday                             May 21st, 12:30-1:30pm

Wednesday                         May 27th, 3:30-4:30pm

Thursday                             May 28th, 12:30-1:30pm

 

FAQ:

  • Who is the program open to?It is for continuing students (freshmen, sophomores, and juniors) in the College of Arts & Sciences. Pre-majors who intended to declare an A&S major are also eligible. Students graduating in spring and summer 2015 are not eligible.
  • What is the program? The Koru@UW A&S program begins with assessing skills and preparing to engage in the professional world, but refined and amended to be more meaningful for our majors as they work on their degrees. It will help you think proactively about all the opportunities you have, and reinforce the value of our majors and the skills associated with them. It will culminate in an employer challenge that lets you put your strengths to task with a local organization.
  • Why should students do the Koru@UW A&S program? We know we have to get more students thinking about post-graduation plans sooner than later. We also hear so much about “what am I going to do with a           ______ degree?” and the worries associated with choosing majors that aren’t deemed “valuable” while an undergraduate. This program is the first of a number of new initiatives the College of Arts & Sciences will embark upon with a variety of partners. Koru@UW A&S is particularly well-suited for students wanting to grow and develop professional skills and networks quickly. It is also a perfect place to situate a better understanding of how the next steps could unfold before and after graduation for students concerned about professional opportunities.
  • How much does it cost?It is $795, and there is financial aid available.
  • When and where is it? There are two sessions: Aug 17-28, 2015 and September 8-18, 2015. Both sessions will take place on the UW campus, and housing is available for those who don’t live in the Seattle area.
  • Do you earn credit for the program? No, this is not an academic course.
  • If you have questions, contact:

Matt Erickson

Education to Employment Initiatives

College of Arts & Sciences

University of Washington

http://artsci.washington.edu/

 

Wednesday: Interviewing Workshop

 

Interviews – Getting Started
UW Career Center
When Wednesday, May 6, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Summary Interviews can be scary—especially when they include questions like the dreaded, “Tell me about yourself.” This workshop addresses general preparation, researching companies, what to expect, and answering behavior-based and other tough, important interview questions.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost Free
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Friday: Cover Letters Workshop

 

Cover Letters – Getting Started
UW Career Center
When Friday, May 1, 2015, 12:30 – 1 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH)
Campus room 134
Summary Wondering how to write an engaging cover letter? You’ll learn how to weave together your strengths with specific examples to write targeted cover letters that emphasize your fit for the job!

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost Free
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Workshop: Acing the Job Interview – next WED

Employer-Led Workshop: Acing the Interview – Insider Tips
(presented by Nordstrom)
Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) 134 (Career Center)

Learn straight from the team at Nordstrom how to prepare for an interview in 3-4 steps – with fun fashion visuals included!

1. Dressing to Impress
2. Preparation before the interview
3. Using examples of past employment and school assignments within the interview process
4. Focusing on your strengths and how to implement them into your answers

No RSVP requested or required; space is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Questions? Email careerevents@uw.edu

Panel: Careers in Sports

Careers in Sports Panel

April 30

4:30 to 6:30, HUB 250

Do you love sports yet know being a professional athlete is not in your future? Ever wondered how you could turn your love of sports into a career?  Then join on April 30th for the Careers in Sports panel!

 

The panel will include representatives from a wide range of opportunities that exist in the sporting world, working with organizations at the collegiate level, in K-12, professional sports organization and one even has past experience working with the Olympics.  The session will be moderated by a Career Center counselor and offer post-panel Q&A and networking opportunities for attendees.  We encourage students from all majors to attend.

 

Questions? Email careerevents@uw.edu

Entrepreneurship deadline approaching

Entrepreneurship Minor

for non-business majors

 

Apply Now

 

Deadline: April 25
Learn More

Some people are just born to change the world. They see opportunities everywhere—from the daily annoyances to the grand challenges that face our society. But we can tell you that it takes more than a great idea. It takes the savvy skill set, knowledge, and energy of an entrepreneur.

If you’re a visionary with the passion and determination to shape the future,
get the business know-how
with the Foster School’s new, competitive Entrepreneurship Minor for undergraduates.

Preparing for graduate school – workshop series

The Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards still has a few workshops upcoming in the Preparing for Graduate School Application series for undergraduate students wanting to get a head start on graduate school applications. Please share this information with your undergraduate students and alumni who may be interested.

 

Preparing for Graduate School Applications — Spring Workshop Series

 

Are you an undergrad planning to apply for grad school this fall? Make the application process less stressful–get a head start on your application materials now. This series of workshops will help you to prepare four of the critical pieces of your application process: finding funding, writing a strong curriculum vitae and personal statement, and getting strong letters of recommendation. Additional information and resources are available on our website: http://expd.washington.edu/scholarships

 

Personal Statement Writing Workshops

Monday, April 20, 2015, 4:30-5:30pm, MGH 171

Wednesday, April 29, 2015, 12:30-1:30pm, MGH 171

The Personal Statement is an important part of an application package. Applying for scholarships and graduate/professional programs often requires a personal statement or application letter. This type of writing requires you to outline your strengths confidently and concisely, which can be challenging. Personal Statement Workshops will provide students with essential information to develop an understanding of not only writing about their interests, eligibility and suitability for applications, but also to learn how their statements provide evidence of their achievements that aren’t reflected in other parts of an application. RSVP to attend at https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/236.

 

Getting Great Recommendation Letters Workshops

Tuesday, April 21, 2015, 4:30-5:30pm, MGH 171

Wednesday, May 6, 2015, 12:30-1:30pm, MGH 171

This workshop will help you plan ahead for developing strong relationships with faculty and other mentors, asking for letters of recommendation, and preparing your recommenders to write you stellar letters. RSVP to attend at https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/289.

 

Curriculum Vitae Writing Workshop

Thursday, April 23, 2015, 12:30-1:30pm, MGH 171

Develop your undergraduate CV for use in graduate school applications! A Curriculum Vitae (“CV” or “vitae”) is a comprehensive, biographical statement emphasizing your professional qualifications and activities. A CV is similar to a resume, but an advantage to the CV format is the significant freedom to choose the headings and categories for your information and the strength reflected in their arrangement. Bring a working draft, such as an existing resume, and a list of activities including: Honors, Awards & Prizes received no longer than 5 years ago, Academic and Research Activities, Community Service Involvement, Work History, and Activities outside of the Academic Environment. In this workshop you will have the opportunity to work with Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards staff to develop and strengthen a draft of your CV! RSVP to attend at https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/237.

Tomorrow: Spring Career Fair, HUB Ballrooms, 3-7pm

This is the biggest annual career fair on cam­pus.  Even if you are not ready to apply for jobs, it is a great oppor­tu­nity to see what’s out there, ask ques­tions, net­work, and ask pro­fes­sion­als to look over your resume.

Banner

2015 SPRING CAREER FAIR

  • Thurs, April 16th
  • 3:00–7:00pm
  • HUB Ball­rooms

The Details

  • All UW stu­dents & alumni from all 3 cam­puses can attend
  • Dress code is busi­ness casual
  • Info about what to expect is here

Next Steps

  • Get to know the employ­ers who are com­ing (being knowl­edge­able about orga­ni­za­tions that inter­est you shows prepa­ra­tion, inter­est, and professionalism)
  • Spruce up your resume at Resume­Fest (April 15th, 8:30–4:30) or in Same-Day Ses­sions
  • Sub­mit your resume to the Spring Career Fair Resume Book (even if you can’t attend!)

Ques­tions

 

  • Please con­tact the Career Cen­ter at 206–543-0535 or email ccsevent@uw.edu

Career Fair Success — Getting Started — workshop

Get ready for Thursdays’ annual Spring Career Fair by participating in this Wednesday workshop:

———————-

Career Fair Success:  Getting Started
UW Career Center
When Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH)
Campus room 134
Summary What are you supposed to do at a career fair? Learn how to plan a strategy for the most effective and efficient use of your time at a fair, how to craft an introduction that makes a good impression, what to wear, and how to follow-up.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost Free
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions .

Learn to Teach English – UW summer certificate in I-TEFL

WANT TO LEARN HOW TO TEACH ENGLISH?

Earn a Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from UW!  The next session runs during summer quarter B-term. Classes are held Monday through Friday, 9am – 4pm.  Learn more at the next Information Session: Thursday, May 7th, 5.30 – 6.30pm, Allen Auditorium.  More info at www.itefl.uw.edu and itefl@pce.uw.edu

E-portfolio Fridays – workshop series

 

The Center for Experiential Learning & Diversity (EXPD) is pleased to announce Spring Quarter e-portfolio workshops for undergraduate students who are developing their e-portfolios or wanting to get started and might be interested in additional supports. Please share widely with your students:

 

Are you working on an e-portfolio this spring, or interested in getting started on one? Join us for any or all of these sessions to get tips, tools, feedback, and connect with other students working on e-portfolios. Need to give yourself some deadlines for completing critical pieces of your e-portfolio? These workshop dates could be helpful for that and would allow you to dedicate time toward completing those pieces. Bring your laptop!

 

RSVP for any session at https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/428

 

  • Peer Interviews:  Friday, April 17, 2015, 12:30-1:50pm, MGH 173R
    • Develop content for your e-portfolio by engaging in relaxed and conversational interviews with your peers to identify key learning experiences, strengths and abilities gained from those experiences.
  • Artifacts/Examples of Work: Friday, April 24, 2015, 12:30-1:50pm, MGH 173R
    • How do you select relevant, appropriate, engaging, and demonstrative papers, photos, videos, art pieces, and other examples of your work to share through your e-portfolio? Who is your audience and what do you want to show them to tell your story? Brainstorm and get feedback from peers and facilitators.
  • Open Work Session: Friday, May 1, 2015, 12:30-1:50pm, MGH 173R
    • Drop in to work on your e-portfolio, get feedback on it from peers and facilitators, or just make sure you dedicate time to getting it done!
  • Presentation Practice Session: Friday, May 8, 2015, 12:30-1:50pm, MGH 171E
    • Will you be presenting your e-portfolio later this spring? Come practice with us and get critical feedback from peers and facilitators! Bring even a rough draft of your portfolio and presentation ideas to try out; it doesn’t need to be complete or polished. This is an opportunity to get feedback on your ideas while you still have time to edit before your final presentation.

 

 

 

Thanks,

 

 

Robin Chang

Associate Director

Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards

Center for Experiential Learning and Diversity

University of Washington

171 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352803

Seattle, WA 98195-2803

206-543-2603   FAX:  206-616-4389

http://expd.washington.edu/scholarships

 

Spring Career Fair events

Be sure to mark your calendars for next week’s Spring Career Fair (Thurs, April 16th, 3-7pm in the HUB).  This is the largest annual career fair on campus.

http://careers.uw.edu/Students/Spring-Career-Fair


Events to help you prepare:

Career Fair & Networking Lab
When Friday, April 10 12:30 – 1:30 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Summary This lab is an opportunity to start implementing what you learned about in the Getting Started workshops on Networking and/or Career Fair Success!  Lab activities may include finding people to network with, researching employers, practicing how to talk with employers and others, and composing thank you or other follow-up emails. If possible, bring your laptop or tablet to the lab.

Ready to explore further or get some practice? Join us for Labs-interactive, engaging workshops. Some labs are come as you are, others request that you bring some materials with you.

Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

——————————

Resumes – Getting Started
When Monday, April 13, 3:30 – 4 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Summary Not happy with your resume? Let us help! We will discuss format, style, and how to write a resume that best reflects your strengths and talents.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

———————————————-

Career Fair Success – Getting Started
When Monday, April 13, 2:30 – 3 PM

or

Wednesday, April 15, 3:30 – 4:00pm

Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134
Summary What are you supposed to do at a career fair? Learn how to plan a strategy for the most effective and efficient use of your time at a fair, how to craft an introduction that makes a good impression, what to wear, and how to follow-up.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Type of Event Workshop
Note

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Job & Internship Search Lab

Job & Internship Search Lab
UW Career Center

Thursday, April 9, 2015, 2:30 – 3:30 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room    134

Join us to utilize job search strategies and put together a strategic job search or internship search plan. Please attend the ‘Job Search—Getting Started or Internship—Getting Started’ workshops prior to attending.

Ready to explore further or get some practice? Join us for Labs-interactive, engaging workshops. Some labs are come as you are, others request that you bring some materials with you.

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Workshop: From English Major to Job Market

Space is limited!  Please RSVP as soon as possible; reservations will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis:


From English Major to Job Market:

Identify Skills; Apply for Internships; Get Started on Your Career Path

Monday, April 13th
2:30pm – 4:50pm

“But what can you DO with an English major????”

We’ve all heard it – the wails of alarm coming from parents and other well-wishers who fear that the choice of an English major spells professional catastrophe.  After all, studying English doesn’t result in any real SKILLS that employers want, right?

Wrong.

English majors develop the skills MOST in demand by employers today.  To find out what this means for yourself, sign up for the upcoming English professional skills workshop on Monday, April 13th.  The workshop is designed to help students identify and articulate their valuable transferable skills. You may have skills, but if you’re unable to recognize and describe them, they will go unnoticed and unappreciated by employers, graduate admissions committees, and that really annoying uncle of yours who always said you’d come to no good.

What you can expect: in this afternoon workshop, we’ll talk about good learning experiences and how they translate into transferable skills, developing strategies for discussing these skills in the language of prospective employers or scholarship/graduate admission committees. You’ll have an opportunity to participate in larger discussions as well as in facilitated small-group exercises.  You’ll have an opportunity to reflect on your educational experiences, and you’ll come away with a much clearer idea of where you’ve been academically, where you’re going, and the essential skills you have to offer.

This small, interactive workshop has a very limited capacity, and we will take reservations on a first-come, first-served basis.

Please RSVP to https://catalyst.uw.edu/webq/survey/engladv/166860
 

We will take reservations on a first-come, first-served basis. Because space is so limited, we ask that you not RSVP unless you are sure you can participate: if you register and then don’t show up, you will be taking a spot away from one of your fellow English majors.

Best wishes,

English Undergraduate Advising
A-2-B Padelford Hall
(206) 543-2634
engladv@uw.edu

Workshop: Resumes – Getting Started

Resumes – Getting Started
UW Career Center

Wednesday, April 8, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room    134

Not happy with your resume? Let us help! We will discuss format, style, and how to write a resume that best reflects your strengths and talents.

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

 

Spring Career Fair – don’t miss it!

Mark your calendars!  This is the biggest annual career fair on campus.  Even if you are not ready to apply for jobs, it is a great opportunity to see what’s out there, ask questions, network, and ask professionals to look over your resume.  If you’re not sure how to proceed at these events, the Career Center offers workshops before the fair where you can work on  your resume and learn about career fair success.  Don’t miss it!

Banner


2015 SPRING CAREER FAIR

  • Thurs, April 16th
  • 3:00-7:00pm
  • HUB Ballrooms

The Details

  • All UW students & alumni from all 3 campuses can attend
  • Dress code is business casual
  • Info about what to expect is here

Next Steps

  • Get to know the employers who are coming (being knowledgeable about organizations that interest you shows preparation, interest, and professionalism)
  • Attend or download our Career Fair Success workshop and/or our Resumes & Cover Letters workshop
  • Spruce up your resume at ResumeFest (April 15th, 8:30-4:30) or in Same-Day Sessions
  • Submit your resume to the Spring Career Fair Resume Book (even if you can’t attend!)

 

Questions

 

  • Please contact the Career Center at 206-543-0535 or email ccsevent@uw.edu

 

Law School Info Session

This event is a great opportunity for anyone interested in law school to meet current students and  Mathiew Le, one of the assistant deans at UW Law. Matt will talk about the admissions process and  attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions. Light snacks will be provided.

Please remember to RSVP by April 8th to uwmlsa@gmail.com. Any additional information is located in the flier attached.  Law school information session

All the Best,

Cecilia


Cecilia Jeong
J.D. Candidate 2016
T: (206) 354-7679
E: jeongc2@u.washington.edu

Identifying Your Strengths lab – Friday

Identifying Your Strengths Lab
UW Career Center
Friday, April 3, 2015, 1:30 – 3 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room    134

You keep hearing, “Employers need to know your strengths,” but think, I don’t even know my strengths! You’re not alone – employers say that up to 80% of candidates can’t name their strengths and thus can’t articulate their fit for a position. This workshop will help you begin to identify your unique strengths/skills/talents and get an edge in securing the job you want. Please join us for an interactive introduction to the Dependable Strengths Process. Come as you are—no preparation needed.

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Workshop: Internships – Getting Started

Internships – Getting Started
UW Career Center
Wednesday, April 1, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Learn basic strategies and tools for a successful internship search!

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

No need to pre-register. Please contact us at 206-543-0535 with any questions.

Career Center events for Spring Quarter!

Are you taking full advantage of the free events and workshops at your UW Career Center?  Highly trained, qualified, and experienced career professionals are there for YOU, whether for quick questions, comprehensive career planning, or the many valuable workshops they present for students, including resumes and cover letters, job search strategies, interviewing, networking, and specialized sessions for students with specific interests.

Check them out today in 134 Mary Gates Hall or http://careers.washington.edu — and see the attachments for spring workshops!

Apply for the NEW Leadership Institute

Alene Moris
National Education for Women’s Leadership

Reminder: Application deadline is April 3

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student with an interest in becoming a leader in your community?

Are you committed to bringing better representation for women in all fields?

Apply for the 2015 Alene Moris National Education for Women’s Leaders Institute.

The Alene Moris National Education for Women’s (NEW) Leadership Institute is part of a national program
started by Rutgers University in 1991. This program is designed to encourage women to seek out
leadership positions and engage more with the civic community. Women are over 50 percent of the American
population and yet they are underrepresented in leadership positions in virtually every field. The Alene
Moris NEW Leadership Institute is working to change that.

The Institute lasts for 6 days, from June 22nd-June 27th, 2015. During that time, participants will meet
some of Washington’s leading women who can offer insight into their experiences and provide important
training and networking skills. Some topics that are covered during the Institute:
*  How to run for political office
*  Public speaking
*  Negotiation
*  Working in the non-profit field
*  Managing diversity in the workplace
*  Networking
All undergraduates and graduates attending any 2 or 4-year Washington State college or Washington
residents attending an out-of-state school are eligible to apply. The cost of the program is $150 and a
limited number of partial scholarships are available. You do not have to be a Political Science major;
anyone with an interest in improving their leadership skills and joining a network of influential women
is encouraged to apply.

Deadline for applications is April 3, 2015

Applications can be found here.

Click here to Recommend a candidate for the Institute.

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For further information about the Institute, please contact Sarah Argodale at newlead@uw.edu or at
206-685-1090.

To request disability accommodation, contact the Disability Services Office at: 206.543.6450 (voice),
206.543.6452 (TTY), 206.685.7264 (fax), or email dso@u.washington.edu. The University of Washington
makes every effort to honor disability accommodation requests. Requests can be responded to most
effectively if received as far in advance of the event as possible, preferably at least 10 days

Attn Alumni: Career (Re)Launch Workshop

Career (Re)Launch Workshop

 

This workshop features three of our key job search workshops including:

LinkedIn or Left Out?
Learn how to build or improve an existing LinkedIn profile, and how to use it effectively to network and gather career information.

Job Search Strategies
What are the most successful job search strategies? How do you use them? How do you find a job in a recovering economy? Learn the answers to all of these questions.

Successful Interviewing
Learn practical information and tips to help you ace any interview by exploring popular questions and how to answer them, interview preparation techniques and more.

Please note this workshop is all group-based, and does not include one on one counseling time or LinkedIn profile reviews.

The cost of the workshop is:

$15.00 for current UWAA members
$20.00 for current/recent grads or community members, non-UWAA members
Register at http://careers.washington.edu/Career-Launch-Workshop
Please note:  Payment must be made by 10 days prior to the workshop. Any registrations with no payment made will be canceled at that point. Registrations submitted within 10 days of the workshop must be accompanied with the appropriate registration fee. Thank you for your cooperation with our registration and payment process!
 

If you have any questions about this or any of our other alumni services, please do not hesitate to contact us at (206) 543-0535.

 

Workshop: “How to Stand Out as an Applicant”

Employer-Led Workshop: How to Stand Out as an Applicant (presented by Fred Hutch)
UW Career Center
Wednesday, March 11, 2015, 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Using the Highlighting Method to Improve Your Resume / Cover Letter, Prepare for Interviews, and Expand Your Networks:

Fred Hutch’s Recruiter, Melissa Loomis, will demonstrate how to use job descriptions to write your resume/CV, craft cover letters, prepare for interviews, and strategize your career path. The advice and Highlighting Method she will share is based on her experience as a Scientific Recruiter and her transition into this career after ten years as a research bench scientist at Fred Hutch. Please print and bring three job descriptions for positions from any organization that you are interested in pursuing.

No RSVP or pre-registration required.  Please plan to arrive early, as space is limited and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Questions? Email careerevents@uw.edu .

Workshop: Identifying Your Strengths

Identifying Your Strengths Lab
UW Career Center

Friday, March 6, 2015, 12:30 – 2 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

You keep hearing, “Employers need to know your strengths,” but think, I don’t even know my strengths! You’re not alone – employers say that up to 80% of candidates can’t name their strengths and thus can’t articulate their fit for a position. This workshop will help you begin to identify your unique strengths/skills/talents and get an edge in securing the job you want. Please join us for an interactive introduction to the Dependable Strengths Process. Come as you are—no preparation needed.

Free

No need to pre-register for this workshop. Questions? Please contact The Career Center at 206-543-0535.

Job Search – Getting Started — workshop

Job Search- Getting Started
UW Career Center

Wednesday, March 4, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Learn basic strategies and tools for a successful job search!

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost: Free

No need to pre-register for this workshop. Questions? Please contact The Career Center at 206-543-0535.

Peace Corps info session

Meet the Employer: Peace Corps
Tuesday, March 3, 2015, 5 – 6:30 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

This event will be a social gathering with the goal for Returned Peace Corps Volunteers to share stories with each other, and other prospective volunteers on the host-country citizens that touched our lives abroad or were instrumental in helping bring about positive change.  If you are a prospective volunteer, this event can be very beneficial for you to hear about these experiences from former volunteers before you depart or decide to apply.

Please RSVP through HuskyJobs at http://careers.washington.edu/Calendar#/?i=1.

If you are a former volunteer and plan to attend, please also email pcorps@uw.edu.

Resume & Cover Letter workshops at the UW Career Center – Tues

Cover Letters-Getting Started
Tue., March 3 | 12:30 – 1 pm
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Wondering how to write an engaging cover letter? You’ll learn how to weave together your strengths with specific examples to write targeted cover letters that emphasize your fit for the job!


Resumes-Getting Started
Tue., March 3 | 3:30 – 4 pm
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Not happy with your resume? Let us help! We will discuss format, style, and how to write a resume that best reflects your strengths and talents.

No reservations necessary.  Come as you are!

UW Environmental Career Fair, 2/25

UW Environmental Career Fair

Wednesday, February 25, 2015
11:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Mary Gates Hall Commons, UW Seattle Campus
Hosted by the UW College of the Environment

Confirmed Employers:

 

Be sure to get your resumes ready and prepare to meet these employers!
What to Expect for Students

  • Explore post-graduation opportunities and learn more about the skills, education, and experience needed to get your dream job
  • Connect with potential employers and build your career network for future career exploration
  • Share your resume with employers
  • Get Hired for internships and careers in environmental fields and discover volunteer opportunities or unpaid internships which build practical skills and provide experience needed to advance your career

Make the Career Fair a success for you!

  • Do your Research – Review the organization’s website before the career fair so your questions are specific to the organization
  • Dress professionally – First impressions are important at Career Fairs
  • Introduce yourself – Work on your brief elevator speech and tell them what skills, education, and experience you have related to the organization or position
  • Leave them with something – Provide them with your resume and contact information
  • Get something from the employer – Ask for a business card or contact information for follow-up communications

For more information and tips on networking, career fairs, interviews, and job searching visit the University of Washington Career Center.
For location, see campus map and directions for Mary Gates Hall Commons.
Search for jobs and internships anytime, online – check out the College of the Environment Careers and Funding Blog.

Questions? Contact envjobs@uw.edu

Final Teach For America deadline 3/6

 

CHOOSE TO CHANGE THE STATUS QUO.

 

FINAL APPLICATION DEADLINE: FRIDAY, MARCH 6th

Start your application: www.teachforamerica.org/apply

Learn more:

  • Our mission in a nutshell (2min video)
  • See how our alumni are working for change after their two years in TFA (3 min video)

The Basics and Benefits of Teach For America:

  • All academic majors and backgrounds can apply
  • 2 year comittment
  • Teach in one of 50 high-need urban or rural communities
  • Salary ranging from $30k to $51k, plus benefits
  • Loan deferment/forbearance with possible Americorps Education Award of ~$11,100
  • Option to earn your certification and/or Masters in Education/teaching
  • DACA recipients are eligible to apply
  • Graduate school and employer partnerships for alumni to continue their leadership and impact

 

Teach For America is developing a movement of leaders who will help drive change at every level of our education system toward the goal of closing the opportunity gap in America. These leaders start their paths as corps members who teach for two years in urban and rural high-need communities and help students make the academic progress that expands their opportunities. Deeply affected by their teaching experience, our alumni continue to advocate for students and build lasting change in many different roles and fields.

For additional information, explore our website and youtube channelmor contact UW Recuitment Manager, Sean Rice (Sean.Rice@teachforamerica.org)

Health Industry Careers for People from All Majors – panel tomorrow

Careers in the Health Industry for People From All Majors
UW Career Center

Thursday, February 19, 2015, 4:30 – 6:30 PM
Student Union Building (HUB) room 214

When you think about a career in health care, the first thing that pops into your head might be images of doctors and nurses, but there are hundreds of other healthcare careers that don’t require a medical or health-related degree.

The Career Center is proud to host Careers in the Health Industry for People From All Majors on February 19th. One of the center’s counselors will moderate a conversation with 3 employers in healthcare focusing on this topic. After about an hour, the floor will be open to Q&A from students in the audience and informal networking.

Representatives from the following companies will be in attendance:

Seattle Children’s Hospital
Neighborcare Health
Caradigm
UW Medicine – Harborview Medical Center & UW Medical Center

No RSVP required. Questions? Please contact crecruit@uw.edu

Wed: Job Search for Seniors workshop

Meetup – Job Search for Seniors
UW Career Center

Wednesday, February 18, 2015, 3:30 – 4:30 PM
Burke Memorial-Washington State Museum (BMM), Burke Cafe

Graduating in the next few quarters? We’ll be discussing all of your questions around when and how to start the job search! Seniors—come as you are with or without questions.

Get valuable feedback and advice (and build connections) from a Career Counselor and other students in one of our Career Meetups. Casual (but productive) conversations, just for UW undergraduates!  To find your Career Meetup, look for the Purple Balloon!

No need to pre-register for this workshop. Questions? Please contact The Career Center at 206-543-0535.

Amazon Career Day – non tech jobs, too!

Interested in seeing what Amazon has to offer in non-tech jobs?  Register by Friday!

 

————————————————————-

Amazon is hosting an inaugural “Career Day” on February 23rd related to their non-tech hiring initiatives, and they’d love to see strong representation Arts & Sciences students.
Interested students can apply through HuskyJobs until February 13th:

  • Log into huskyjobs.washington.edu/students
  • Go to the search bar at the top right of your homepage
  • Enter position ID #87113 and hit search
  • Locate the position title and click on it
  • Read the job description and application information

 

Please see the attached poster for more details.

 

Spring quarter Career Center course offerings

**************************************

 

The Career Center is excited to offer two classes (General Studies 297G & 391N) this spring, designed to meet the needs of undergraduate students seeking information and inspiration about career options and strategy.  We encourage you to review these class overviews, quotes from students who have taken our classes in previous quarters, and most importantly (if you are a student), consider taking one of our classes.   http://careers.uw.edu/Classes

 

General Studies 297G

  • Title: Career Planning
  • Mondays/Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20, room TBD
  • Instructor: Tina Wang (Career Counselor, Lead)
  • Credits: 2
  • Size of class: up to 50 students
  • Spring 2015 SLN: 20772

 

This course assists freshmen and sophomore students (first and second year students) with self-exploration and exploration of career and academic options. General Studies 297G (“Career Planning”), is a 2-credit course (CR/NC) where students attend two 50-minute classes each week. This course is designed for first and second-year students who have earned roughly 0-89 credits. No pre-requisites are required.

Learning objectives:

  1. Build self-awareness and appreciation for your strengths, skills, values, and interests and learn how to use this self-knowledge to make decisions when exploring and pursuing academic and career options.
  2. Develop and apply learned skills to effectively research career options and learn how to be successful in the job market and hone your professional networking skills (including online, social media, and traditional networking).
  3. Learn how to create effective resumes, cover letters and build interviewing skills and confidence.

For additional details or questions please contact Tina Wang in the Career Center ( tinaiw@uw.edu ; 206.685.6216 ).

 

General Studies 391N

  • Title: Career Strategy and Job Search
  • Tuesday/Thursday, 2:30-3:20, room TBD
  • Instructor: Patrick Chidsey (Career Counselor, Lead)
  • Credits: 2
  • Size of class: up to 50 students
  • Spring 2015 SLN: 20773

 

This course assists juniors/transfer students/seniors (3rd & 4th year students) with self-exploration, investigation of career options and development of career and job search strategy.  General Studies 391N (“Career Strategy and Job Search”), is a graded, 2-credit course where students attend two 50-minute classes each week. This course is designed for juniors, transfer students and seniors (3rd & 4th year students) who have earned roughly 90 credits or more. No pre-requisites are required.

Learning objectives:

  1. Grow self-awareness and appreciation for your strengths, skills, values, and interests and learn how to use this important self-knowledge when taking action in job searching and building a career strategy.
  2. Build ability to effectively research career options and learn how to be successful in the competitive job market.
  3. Learn how to create effective resumes, cover letters, strong LinkedIn profiles (and online and in-person networking skills), grow interviewing skills and confidence.

For additional details or questions please contact Patrick Chidsey in the Career Center ( chidsey@uw.edu ; 206.616.5803 ).

 

Sample of Student Feedback Who Took Our Career Classes in 2014:

  • “I have become more confident and excited about my future. Thank you!”
  • “It’s a practical class”
  • “This class puts you in a better position when job hunting”
  • “Thank you! I really appreciate your positive attitude. It’s extremely refreshing”
  • “This class definitely pointed me in the right direction and has me thinking about things that I wouldn’t have thought of before”
  • “I just wanted to say thanks for taking the time to teach this seminar, it was shockingly helpful and I definitely got WAY more out of it than I intended.”
  • “I liked the positive focus on self and applicability to all students”
  • “Thank you for the course, I thought it was fantastic. Quite honestly I wish something like it were required for all undergraduates.  I think everyone would benefit from it.”
  • “Thank you for all your help this quarter. This class was a tremendous help to steering me in the right direction to reach my goals.”
  • “I liked the career exploration aspects and the panels of recent graduates”
  • “I found the class inspired me to be more proactive about my career.  I think this information should be required for freshmen.”
  • “This class got me thinking a lot about interviews and career options and where to get help”
  • “This class helped me to grow much more quickly.  It made me realize that I’m no longer just a child or student.  I’m taking away from this class, passion and power to move on instead of just goofing around.  This class is fun.”
  • “I liked the self investigation and how-to’s.  Class introduced new ways of thinking and gets you to think more about where you’re going and who you are.”
  • “I liked that the class demystified the job searching, application and interview process.  I also left feeling more confident that my major doesn’t set my life in stone and that is such a huge relief.”
  • “This class instills confidence.  I was unsure about my career, if I’d even get a job, how the process works, till this class.  Even if I don’t know exactly what I will do still, it gave me confidence that I’m not that underqualified.  This class is most beneficial to starting/incoming students.”
  • “It made me feel prepared and enthusiastic about the future because of all the skills and advice taught”
  • “I liked that every week I came out of class feeling motivated to improve some aspect of my life.  I think that is very valuable.  I think this class should actually be a requirement for graduation.”
  • “I liked the strengths topics and encouragement to seek opportunities”.  Class was a great guide to finding opportunities”
  • “I liked that all the subjects were valuable but not in an academic way like all the other classes I’ve taken.   This class is applicable to the real world.”
  • “I liked the panels and hearing I don’t have to find my dream job right away.  Class is helpful to anyone that needs help learning how to job search.  Career Center seems less intimidating now”
  • “I am taking away from the class, how important it is to think about my future now, but this class has pointed me in the right direction.  One of the most helpful classes I have taken at UW. I really thought the panels were helpful, as well as the interviewing tips”
  • “I liked the atmosphere about this class.  It’s not like a stressful lecture type of class, and it’s very helpful.”
  • “I liked the chance to talk with other students about their experience, and the chance to think more about yourself”

Workshop: Internships – Getting Started

Internships-Getting Started
UW Career Center

Monday, February 9, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Learn basic strategies and tools for a successful internship search!

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost: Free

No need to pre-register for this workshop.

Questions? Please contact The Career Center at 206-543-0535.

CityYear Info Session

Meet the Employer: City Year Seattle/King County
UW Career Center

Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 6:30 – 7:30 PM
Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

City Year is an AmeriCorps program and education focused, non-profit organization that unites young people of all backgrounds for a demanding year of full-time service to keep students in school and on track to graduation.

Evidence-based research has identified the early warning indicators that allow us to identify the students likely to drop out of school. By focusing on attendance, behavior, and course performance, AmeriCorps members are uniquely able to help students and schools succeed.

We are looking for 17-24 year olds to become tutors, mentors, and role models.  City Year AmeriCorps members make a difference in the lives of children, and transform schools and neighborhoods in 26 US cities.

If you are a looking for a post graduation, full-time position starting July 2015 through June 2016, our next application deadline is February 15th.  For more information, please check out our website, www.cityyear.org.

Open to Juniors and Seniors; all majors are accepted.

RSVP ENCOURAGED
Space may be limited and seating is on a first-come-first served basis, RSVP does not guarantee that you will get a seat. RSVP is used for an employer head count, and to notify you if any changes are made to the event.

If you have not already done so, please RSVP for this event in HuskyJobs www.huskyjobs.washington.edu/students/

Internship Fair! 2/12

intfair
2015 Internship Fair
Thursday, February 12, 2015, 2 – 6 PM
Student Union Building (HUB) Ballrooms

Are you looking to gain an internship opportunity? Search no more! The Career Center’s Internship Fair is a great opportunity for students of all majors and class levels from all three UW Campuses to connect with over 90 corporate, small business, non-profit and government employers who are all looking for Huskies, like YOU, to fill their internship needs. Don’t miss out on this perfect opportunity!

For a list of employers register so far, please go to http://www.careers.uw.edu/Students/Internship-Fair

Resume workshop on Monday

Resumes – Getting Started
UW Career Center

When:    Monday, February 2, 2015, 3:30 – 4 PM
Campus location:    Mary Gates Hall (MGH)
Campus room: MGH  134

Summary:    Not happy with your resume? Let us help! We will discuss format, style, and how to write a resume that best reflects your strengths and talents.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost:    free

Note:    No need to pre-register for this workshop. Questions? Please contact The Career Center at 206-543-0535.

Business course for non business majors

ESRM 320 is an introductory business course designed for non-business majors. It has NO prerequisites, offers NW and I&S, and is 5 credits. We cover the basics of marketing and human resource management with sustainability *  (environmental and social responsibility) woven throughout the course. THIS IS AN ONLINE COURSE that meets in person only three times: 4:30-6:50 pm, on Tuesday, March 31 (course introduction), Tuesday, May 5 (midterm exam), and Tuesday June 2, (final exam), in 223 Anderson Hall.
ABOUT 320…
For-profit companies and non-profit organizations use marketing and human resources to create and deliver products, services, and ideas. This course explores: 1) business practices that are aligned with environmental stewardship and social responsibility standards; 2) the concepts and models of a market orientation; 3) how markets are researched and targeted, and products positioned, to meet consumer needs; 4) creating and pricing products, developing distribution channels, and implementing promotion campaigns; 5) managerial and leadership skills and styles; 6) how companies motivate employees and develop human capital; and 7) methods for recruiting, selecting, training, and evaluating employees. * Sustainability refers to integrating environmental, social, and financial/economic elements in order to meet the needs of people today without compromising Earth’s capacity to provide for future generations. This course explores the meaning and importance of sustainable business practices that respect and adhere to best environmental science methods and ethical social responsibility standards. The context for this exploration will be reviewing corporate sustainability reports.
At the end of this course, students will be able to:
1) Explain the vocabulary, concepts, and models of marketing, human resources, and sustainability
2) Summarize how a market orientation and commitment to sustainability can enhance customer and employee satisfaction
3) Describe how consumer markets are segmented, targeted, and products positioned to satisfy individual, government, and business consumers’ wants and needs
4) Define managerial and leadership styles and theories of motivation, persuasion, and influence
5) Summarize the human resource process of recruiting, interviewing, hiring, training, motivating, and evaluating employees
6) Investigate and interpret corporate environmental and social responsibility information provided in corporate sustainability reports.
This is a link to the ESRM 320 course website, which is open to all UW students who want more course information before they register: https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/965259/assignments/syllabus.
Thank you.

Dorothy Paun, PhD, MBA
University of Washington
396 Bloedel Hall, Box 352100
Seattle, WA 98195 USA

Annual Diversity Career Fair – 1/27

divcareerfair

Diversity Career Fair | January 27, 2015

JOBS!  INTERNSHIPS!  Something for ALL UW students! A fantastic opportunity!

*******************************************

What:     Diversity Career Fair

When:   Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Where:  University of Washington – Husky Union Building (HUB) Ballroom

Time:     5:30PM-8:30PM

*******************************************

All Majors (Business, Engineering, Liberal Arts & the Sciences)

All Class Levels (Freshman,Sophomore, Junior, Senior, Grad, PhD)

*******************************************

Dress Code: Business Casual

*******************************************

List of participating employers:  http://students.washington.edu/uwnsbe/corporate/2015_Employers.pdf

*******************************************

10 Tips to Prepare for the Fair

  1. Research employers in advance
  2. Create a well prepared resume & bring 10-15 copies to job fair
  3. Dress appropriately (Business Casual)
  4. Identify employers that interest you the most
  5. Arrive early to allow time to interact with employers
  6. Greet employers with a smile and handshake
  7. Prepare an introductory speech ( a two-three line script to introduce yourself & express your interest)
  8. Collect business cards
  9. Send a thank you note to interested companies you meet at job fair
  10. Complete any online applications as requested by employers

Workshop: Anatomy of a Job Posting

Anatomy of a Job Posting – Getting Started
UW Career Center

When:    Friday, January 23, 2015, 12:30 – 1 PM
Campus location:    Mary Gates Hall (MGH) room 134

Summary:    Should you apply for a position if you don’t have every qualification?  What activities can you count as “experience”? How can you use the information in a job posting to customize your resume, ace the interview, and get a job offer? This workshop will address these and other questions about how to read and interpret job and internship announcements to help you optimize your opportunities.

Getting Started workshops are short, 30 minute presentations on strategies for success in the job search. Join us for topics including LinkedIn, resumes, and career fair success! Come as you are.

Cost:    Free

No need to pre-register for this workshop. Questions? Please contact The Career Center at 206-543-0535.

Recent grads: Career Scholarships Available

Hello recent College of Arts and Sciences alumni,

 

As you consider your next steps post-UW, I wanted to make you aware of a valuable opportunity to help you land a great job. Koru, a local company that helps college grads land meaningful jobs after graduation is offering several free scholarships to their upcoming program for recent College of Arts and Sciences grads (those having completed their degree within the past three years). You’ll need to act quickly, though, because it requires you taking action this week.

 

Koru works with high-growth employers to give college grads the skills, experience, network and mentorship to land awesome jobs.  Over 85% of Koru’s grads are now working in fast-growing companies like AmazonLinkedinzulilyPorchREI, and Nordstrom (there are over 20 hiring partners in Seattle alone).

 

Koru has set aside a number of scholarship dollars for its upcoming program in Seattle exclusively for UW Arts and Sciences grads.  The program runs January 26 through February 13 .  We encourage you to apply by end of day Thursday, January 22.  Use the code UWKORU so they know to give you access to the scholarship.

 

The application is very brief and there’s no reason not to apply – see if you get in and then figure out the details/logistics.  If you have questions, email Josh Jarrett, Koru co-founder and Chief Learning Officer, at josh@joinkoru.com.

 

Best of luck,

Dean Stacey

 

 

CV Writing & Scholarship Search Workshops

 

THIS WEEK: Scholarship search and CV writing workshops from the Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards

 

Scholarship 101: Getting Started in the Search for Scholarships

Specifically designed for freshmen and sophomores, this introductory workshop provides students with information to begin the scholarship search and to develop a competitive edge for merit-based scholarships.

 

Curriculum Vitae Writing Workshop:

Develop your undergraduate CV/Resume for use in scholarship, fellowship, research opportunities, and graduate school applications! Bring a working draft, such as an existing resume, and a list of activities, experiences, jobs, honors, etc.

 

 

Thank you again,

 

Robin Chang

Associate Director

Office of Merit Scholarships, Fellowships & Awards

Center for Experiential Learning and Diversity

University of Washington

171 Mary Gates Hall, Box 352803

Seattle, WA 98195-2803

206-543-2603   FAX:  206-616-4389

http://expd.washington.edu/scholarships

 

Teach for America deadlines

 

APPLICATION DEADLINES: Friday, January 30 or Friday, March 6*

Start your application www.teachforamerica.org/apply

*Limited regional preferences

Teach For America is developing a movement of leaders who will help drive change at every level of our education system toward the goal of closing the opportunity gap in America. These leaders start their paths as corps members who teach for two years in urban and rural high-need communities and help students make the academic progress that expands their opportunities.  Deeply affected by their teaching experience, our alumni continue to advocate for students and build lasting change in many different roles and fields. In the chart below, you can find different ways to engage with TFA in the coming weeks.

 

The Basics and Benefits of Teach For America:

  • All academic majors and backgrounds accepted
  • Salary up to $51,000 with health insurance and retirement benefits
  • Graduate school and employer partnerships for alum to continue their leadership and impact
  • Regional placement is not random; applicants preference location in our 50 regions
  • All grade levels (preK-12) and subjects including ELL and SpEd
  • Possible AmeriCorps Education Award of $11,100 and loan deferment/forbearance
  • Option to earn your certification and/or Masters in Education/teaching
  • DACA recipients are eligible to apply. Learn more here.

TFA in the eyes of former huskies:

Event Title Details Description
  A day in the life of a teacher:

Wondering what it’s like to be a teacher?  Whether you need a particular major? How to get started?  What a day looks like?  Come hear from a panel of teachers, all of whom took different paths and programs to arrive at becoming teachers in elementary or secondary settings.  This moderated panel will include 4-5 teachers, as well as time for post-panel Q&A.

Diversity Career Fair

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Tuesday, Jan 27

5:30-8:30pm

HUB

http://careers.washington.edu/Calendar#/?i=2
Science Job and Internship Fair Wednesday, Jan 28

2-5pm

HUB

http://careers.washington.edu/Calendar#/?i=2
Undocumented Voices: Dialogue and Call of Action

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Thursday, Jan 29

6:30pm

Ethnic Cultural Center: Unity Room

Undocumented Voices: Dialogue and Call of Action

This event (similar in format to “U lead, We lead” brings together leaders on the front lines of immigration reform. This issue is closely tied to TFA is one of the few organizations that allow DACA recipients to apply. RSVP Here

Choose to define your success by what you help others achieve

For additional information, explore our website and youtube channel or contact UW’s Manager of Recruitment, Sean Rice (Sean.Rice@teachforamerica.org) 

Panel: “A Day in the Life of a Teacher”

“A Day in the Life of a Teacher”
UW Career Center

When Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 4 – 5:30 PM
Campus location Student Union Building (HUB)
Campus room room 214
Summary Wondering what it’s like to be a teacher?  Whether you need a particular major? How to get started?  What a day looks like?  Come hear from a panel of teachers, all of whom took different paths and programs to arrive at becoming teachers in elementary or secondary settings.  This moderated panel will include 4-5 teachers, as well as time for post-panel Q&A.
Event sponsors Sponsored by the Career Center, College of Ed, C21, Dream Project and Pipeline Project
Note

There is no RSVP required for this event; space will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Questions? Email careerevents@uw.edu

Today @ 12:30 – Teaching as Leadership, presented by Teach for America

Employer-Led Workshop: Teaching As Leadership (Presented by Teach for America)
UW Career Center

When Wednesday, January 14, 2015, 12:30 – 1:20 PM
Campus location Mary Gates Hall (MGH)
Campus room room 134 MGH
Summary Come hear from Teach for America about the ‘Teaching As Leadership’ framework for leadership, which is based off extensive research about what makes the most effective teachers. While the principles laid out here are based on classroom instruction, they go far beyond the classroom. These principles can be applied to many different fields and focus primarily on what it take to lead a team or an organization.
Note

No RSVP or pre-registration is required.  Space is limited, and will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Diversity Career Fair, Jan 27th

The annual Diversity Career Fair is coming up on January 27 – please share the news with students!

 

JOBS!  INTERNSHIPS!  Something for ALL UW students! A fantastic opportunity!

 

What:     Diversity Career Fair

When:   Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Where:  University of Washington – Husky Union Building (HUB) Ballroom

Time:     5:30PM-8:30PM

 

All Majors (Business, Engineering, Liberal Arts & the Sciences)

All Class Levels (Freshman,Sophomore, Junior, Senior, Grad, PhD)

 

Dress: Business Casual

 

List of participating employers:  http://students.washington.edu/uwnsbe/corporate/students.html