The PNW Archaeology Lab @ UW

Welcome to the Pacific Northwest Archaeology Lab and UW Seattle, directed by Dr. Sara Gonzalez.  The lab is currently located in Condon Hall 511c.

Projects

The lab currently hosts several archaeological and community-based projects Washington and Oregon.

Field Methods in Indigenous Archaeology (FMIA) is a community-based field school that offers hands-on training in tribal historical preservation and archaeological field methods.  FMIA is co-directed by Sara Gonzalez and the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office.  We are currently accepting applications for our 2016 field season, which runs from June 20 – August 5.

The Grand Ronde Land Tenure Project is a community-based research project sponsored by the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office and contributed to by Ian Kretzler, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology.  Since August 2014, the Grand Ronde Land Tenure Project has recovered 47 maps of the Grand Ronde Reservation from the 1850s through the 1960s. These maps provide a diachronic history of residence, property title, and land use on the reservation, providing critical knowledge of the Grand Ronde community’s persistence on the reservation despite the implementation of policies such as allotment explicitly intended to disrupt community cohesion.

If you are interested in interning in the lab please contact Dr. Gonzalez (gonzalsa@uw.edu) for more information.

Lab Affiliates

Kretzler_biopicIan Kretzler is a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology. His research focuses on Indigenous and community-based archaeologies and Native-lived colonialisms in the Pacific Northwest during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

 

Ngandali_Yolona_5x7Yoli Ngandali is a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology. She is interested in developing new ways to incorporate digital media (audio, video, web, animation) into archaeological practice. Digital technologies are a valuable tool for cultural heritage collections and can be used to engage local and descendant communities.

 

David Carlson is a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology.  His research concerns the intersections of material culture, immigration, race, and labor in United States history.