Meet, Greet, Teach: Death of Art, Death of Science — May 28

An Infor­mal Con­ver­sa­tion about Inter­dis­ci­pli­nary Teach­ing on Envi­ron­men­tal Issues

Tues­day, May 28, 2013
5:00–6:30 PM
Pro­gram on the Envi­ron­ment Com­mons, Wal­lace Hall (ACC) 012

Free to attend.  RSVP requested by Thurs­day, May 23, 2013


Can the totally ratio­nal, reduc­tion­ist envi­ron­men­tal sci­en­tist really under­stand the world with­out the cre­ativ­ity of music, visual art, dance, or poetry?  Can the artist attempt­ing to cap­ture the arche­type of envi­ron­men­tal loss cre­ate a richer tableau by know­ing some­thing about how the phys­i­cal world works?   If soci­ety, or a uni­ver­sity under­go­ing bud­get cuts, slashes one side, will the other be poorer?

We learn – and teach — that art and sci­ence are worlds apart.  The right and left brains. Rig­or­ous ver­sus cre­ative.  Absinthe ver­sus beer.

Or should we recon­sider that thesis?

Join us for the final MGT of the year for provoca­tive com­ments from artists and sci­en­tists on how our worlds col­lide, even as the ships pass.

Pan­elists:

  • Jen­nifer Bean, Direc­tor, Cin­ema and Media Stud­ies; Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor, Com­par­a­tive Literature
  • Philip Govedare, Pro­fes­sor and Grad­u­ate Coor­di­na­tor, School of Art
  • Richard Karpen, Direc­tor, School of Music; Pro­fes­sor, Dig­i­tal Arts and Exper­i­men­tal Medida (DXARTS)
  • Bruce Nel­son, Pro­fes­sor, Earth & Space Sci­ences; Asso­ciate Dean for Research, Col­lege of the Environment

ABOUT MGT:
MGT is an evening series offer­ing grad­u­ate stu­dents, post­docs, staff and fac­ulty with an inter­est in engag­ing in art­ful, inter­ac­tive, inno­v­a­tive teach­ing a chance to inter­act with col­leagues from across cam­pus who are will­ing to share their enthu­si­asm and expe­ri­ence.  
Each MGT focuses on a sin­gle “30,000 foot” issue: What is inter­dis­ci­pli­nary? The role of facts ver­sus val­ues. Can per­son­al­ized teach­ing be objec­tive teach­ing? Sav­ing STEM.

Over a glass of wine and light appe­tiz­ers, atten­dees have a chance to mix and min­gle before set­tling down to a 30-minute “fast panel” of 3–5 fac­ulty, each deliv­er­ing thought — and con­ver­sa­tion — pro­vok­ing answers. With time for both struc­tured and social inter­ac­tion, MGT presents an oppor­tu­nity for every­one to have a say, make a con­tact, find a shared direc­tion, and learn some­thing new.

Want­ing more follow-up? We’ll wrap up the ses­sion with time for more one-on-one inter­ac­tion, giv­ing every­one time to grab a speaker for a final comment.



Spon­sored by the Col­lege of the Envi­ron­ment and hosted by the Pro­gram on the Environment

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