Tomorrow: Attend the Praxis Conference on “Learning through Doing: Crafting Meaning through Making-Oriented Pedagogy

We invite you to attend the third annual Praxis Conference on the UW campus (Haggett Hall) on January 20, 2017 from 9:00-3:00. To register to attend, complete this google form by January 13, 2017: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1fePn-WnNc44XsyFUWf59kSQRhb57NaCE64WTIrcrt_o/viewform?ts=58570468&edit_requested=true. Please be sure to note whether you will be joining us for lunch. There is no cost for registration or for lunch thanks to the Conference host, English Department Writing Programs, and our co-sponsors, College Writing, Carlson Leadership and Public Service Center, and Kollar Gift for Literacy.

The Praxis Conference draws on the activist educator Paolo Freire’s conception of praxis as the intersection of theory and practice.Faculty, staff, students, instructors and community partners share insights to enrich both our local/situated and broader understandings of writing, teaching and learning practices, and their personal, academic, and public impacts.

The theme for Praxis 2017 is “Learning through Doing: Crafting Meaning through Making-Oriented Pedagogy” and we will use this lens to focus on uses of language and literacy in practical, inclusive, critical, applied ways. This year’s keynote speaker is Ekin Yasin, a faculty member in the UW Department of Communication. In her talk entitled “Actively Global and Globally Active: The Classroom as a window we open to the world,” she will discuss the central importance of linking active learning, diverse student identities, and global thinking.

Praxis 2017 takes place on inauguration day. Though the planning committee respects a range of political beliefs, we are troubled by the post-election rise in hate speech, hate crimes, harassment of the historically vulnerable, and proposals from the incoming administration that attack basic rights, protections and values. While these threats are not new, they are newly public and explicit.

For those conference participants who are interested, we will make space for the Praxis community to make connections between our shared work and the inauguration through reflection, processing, community building, crafting/creating, goal-setting and reaffirming the path forward based on the values embodied in the work we do. As many of you know from your participation in Praxis 2015 and/or 2016, the Praxis Conference is a lively forum for making and continuing conversations and connections about critical writing pedagogy, and we will continue to provide a safe space to do that once again this year.

For more information about Praxis, our goals, archives from 2015 and 2016, and the program for 2017 visit our website: https://english.washington.edu/teaching/praxis-conference. Feel free  to contact Praxis Conference Chair Jacki Fiscus (jfiscus@uw.edu) or Co-Chair Holly Shelton (hshelton@uw.edu) with any questions.

What makes Bach sound like Bach? New dataset teaches algorithms classical music

“The composer Johann Sebastian Bach left behind an incomplete fugue upon his death, either as an unfinished work or perhaps as a puzzle for future composers to solve.

A classical music dataset released Wednesday by University of Washington researchers — which enables machine learning algorithms to learn the features of classical music from scratch — raises the likelihood that a computer could expertly finish the job.”

Read more at UW Today.

Birth of an Anthem: Bow Down to Washington

“As the USS Congress pulled into San Francisco Bay on the beautiful fall evening of Thursday, Nov. 4, 1915, UW football fans onboard held a boisterous rally on the foredeck under purple and gold streamers strung everywhere from the giant steamship’s rigging. This was the year of the San Francisco World’s Fair, the Pan Pacific International Exposition. The skyline and the fair pavilions on the shoreline formed a magnificent backdrop as the band blared out “Bow Down to Washington” with those onboard singing at the top of their lungs.”

For the full story, please see Columns.

Welcome back with library tours and video games

DAWG daze are here again!  Come take a tour of the Suzzallo Library or Odegaard Library.  Play video games at the Suzzallo Library West entrance as the Media Center unveils their new video game collection from 11am-3pm.  Learn more about free technology and discounts you can use to support your classes.  Interested in a tour of the Music Library?  Email vkern at uw.edu

Back home again: UW ethnomusicologists return heritage music to its roots

“This is a story about folk music, hill music and scratchy early blues — about guitars and banjos, fifes and flutes, and voices raised in song on sweltering back porches many years ago.

And it’s about how people from the University of Washington School of Music’s Ethnomusicology Program are helping return some of that music — collected decades ago and fading from local memory — to its birthplace, with teaching materials to explain its cultural and historical context.”

Read the full story in UW Today.

Thesis / Dissertation Webinar for UW Graduate Students, April 1st 3:30-5:00PM

The Graduate School and UW Libraries will present students with basic information about submitting their Electronic Thesis or Dissertation (ETD). The webinar will cover important topics such as publishing, copyright, open access, delayed release, ProQuest/UMI and university publication agreements, preparing an ETD for submission and an overview of the electronic submission process. Participants will have an opportunity to submit questions.

This session will take place April 1st, 3:30-5:00 PM.  Space is limited so register today.

 

Info Sessions – Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities

There are still plenty of spots available in the upcoming Info Sessions for the Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities. The first info session is this Thursday, February 13. All students interested in applying to the Summer Institute are encouraged to attend. Bring your Summer Institute questions and learn more about the application process, what you can expect if you are selected, and what our expectations are for students.

Summer Institute Information Sessions will be held on the following dates:

Thursday, February 13 – 4:30-5:30 pm
Thursday, February 27 – 4:30-5:30 pm
Monday, March 3 – 12:30-1:30 pm

All sessions will be held in Mary Gates Hall 171.

Register here: https://expo.uw.edu/expo/rsvp/event/429

The Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities selects and supports twenty UW undergraduates (Seattle, Bothell, & Tacoma) to engage in intensive research projects under the guidance of four interdisciplinary instructors on the UW Seattle campus.

Students selected to participate in the Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities:

  • engage in intensive scholarly work under the guidance of four instructors
  • are named Mary Gates Scholars and receive a $4,000 scholarship to help defray costs of participation
  • earn 12 academic credits over terms A & B of Summer Quarter (are eligible to receive financial aid if applicable)
  • present their final projects in the Summer Institute Symposium

This year’s Institute invites students to explore rich histories of Native struggles, contemporary (trans)national Indigenous social movements, and repertoires of decolonizing artistic, cultural, and intellectual production. Students will also explore the long-standing double-bind that Indigenous peoples face: their practices are seen as out-of-place (or dangerous) by the rules of settler-societies and “inauthentic” when they employ the logics and languages of dominant markets and states. We welcome student projects that explore topics that include (but are not limited to) Indigenous social movements, encounters between European and Native epistemologies (in debates over archaeology, genetics, nature, and religion), contrasting colonial and Native temporalities, and Native artistic production (including literature and the visual, plastic, and performing arts).

Celebration of Witold Lutosławski Year

Thursday, February 27, 2014 – 7:00pm
Brechemin Auditorium
The UW Polish Studies Endowment Committee joins the celebration of Witold Lutosławski’s centenary and presents the life and music of the great Polish composer.  Lutosławski, a pre-eminent European artist of the 20th century, will be shown in a documentary made recently by two international experts on his music, Esa-Pekka Salonen and Steven Stucky, who took a trip to Poland to explore aspects of the artist’s life.  After the film, the rich Partita for Violin and Piano will be performed by School of Music students Allion Abraham Salvador and Josh Archibald-Seiffer. Finally, acclaimed pianists Dr. Ivona Kaminska and Dr. Christopher Bowlby will perform a perennial favorite – Lutosławski’s Variations on a Theme by Paganini for Two Pianos.
Introduction:  Prof. Huck Hodge
For more information, please see the Slavic Language & Literatures’ website.

2014 Undergraduate Research Symposium – Application now open!

The application for the 17th Annual UW Undergraduate Research Symposium is now open!  The Sym­po­sium will be held on May 16, 2014 in Mary Gates Hall.  Last year, more than 1,000 under­grad­u­ates par­tic­i­pated.

To learn more and start an appli­ca­tion, visit the Under­grad­u­ate Research Sym­po­sium sec­tion of the URP web­site. All UW under­grad­u­ates involved in research are encour­aged to apply. The appli­ca­tion dead­line is Feb­ru­ary 24, 2014.

Inter­ested stu­dents are also encour­aged to attend one of our upcom­ing Sym­po­sium Info Ses­sions. When you are ready to apply, sign up for one of our Abstract Writ­ing Work­shops.

Not yet involved in research? Vol­un­teer or stop by on the day of the event to learn more about the research that UW under­grads are par­tic­i­pat­ing in, from projects in syn­thetic chem­istry to new ideas in the realm of dance.

If you have any questions, contact urp@uw.edu.