OA Week – Open Educational Resources!

OERschools.com logo by B. Haßler, H. Neo & J. Fraser/ Leicester City Council

It’s International Open Access Week!
Have you thought about using course materials that offer your students free or low cost access?

What are Open Educational Resources?
OERs are any type of educational materials that are in the public domain or introduced with an open license. The nature of these open materials means that anyone can legally and freely copy, use, adapt and re-share them.  -UNESCO

Why use OER?
Using OERs in your course can have a huge impact on students by reducing or eliminating textbook costs and lowering the overall cost of higher education. OERs can also enhance your pedagogy! You can use OER repositories to find new ideas, activities and resources posted by instructors from around the country. Many of these resources are peer reviewed and frequently updated.

How are UWB/CC Faculty using OER?
Faculty on both campuses are integrating OER into their courses. Are you using OER in your class? Let us know!

Want to find out more?
Check out our Open Educational Resources guide for more information about OER resources, Open Textbook repositories, and examples of OER adoption on our campus.

Ask us!

Sincerely, your UWB/CC OER Team :  Alyssa Berger, Todd Conaway, Bryce Figueroa, Nia Lam, Sarah Leadley, Suzan Parker, Anne Tuominen, and Chris Zempel

We are a cross-campus group dedicated to supporting faculty as they explore the world of OER, affordable textbook options, and expanded use of Libraries licensed materials.

It is Open Access Week!

Open Access Week 2017 logo

Image by Nick Shockey, openaccessweek.org, CC-BY-4.0

 

This week the Library is participating in international Open Access Week! Open Access Week is a celebration of shared knowledge, open scholarship, and barrier-free research and scholarly publishing. Learn more about Open Access Week on their website.

The UW Libraries has assembled an inspiring collection of voices from across the University of Washington describing faculty and staff experiences with open access and with practicing open scholarship and research. This project is called “How I Work Open.” Please stop by the Library to see posters featuring your colleagues’ stories! These stories are also posted on the UW Libraries’ new open access blog, Open @ UW . Keep an eye out for UWB IAS Senior Lecturer Julie Shayne and UWB/CC Library Digital Scholarship + Collections Curator Denise Hattwig.

And as a reminder, here are links to our UWB/CC Library open access resources:

Please contact Sarah Leadley, Library Director, or your subject librarian if you’d like to talk more about open access or how you can “work open!”

Preprints: What, Why, and Where?

The paths of Scholarly Publishing and Open Access can be difficult to follow.  What are your rights as a researcher and scholar, when and how do those rights change, what are publisher rights, who pays whom, and who has access to the published research?  When you have managed to figure out your way on that path, you may encounter various acronyms and terms that can also make the going slow, e.g. CTA, Gold OA, IR, SHERPA, & preprint. What do they mean, and do they really matter?

Let’s just start with one of these terms: the preprint.  In our previous post on Understanding Your Author Rights, we mentioned that you may be able to archive a preprint of your article in our institutional repository (IR), ResearchWorks.  So, what is a preprint and why might you want to archive it?

A preprint is generally understood to be a working paper or a pre-publication version of a paper. Publishers often define preprints more precisely, and may specify that a preprint is an author’s final version, a version prior to peer review, or any version of the paper prior to its final editing and formatting. Review your CTA (Copyright Transfer Agreement) to determine your publisher’s definition of a preprint. Searching SHERPA/RoMEO by journal or publisher can also provide you with specific preprint archiving policies.

If you determine that it is permitted and you would like to archive your preprint, your research and other scholars can enjoy the following benefits:

  • The core of your research becomes available more quickly
  • Your research will have broader exposure, reaching those both with and without access to expensive databases and journals
  • Articles can be open access
  • OA funder mandates can be met (consult your funder or Sherpa/Juliet to determine funder mandates
  • Payments to publisher for Open Access status are not required

Okay, you have made it this far down the road with us and you have determined your CTA allows you to archive your preprint.  You want to quickly provide open access to your scholarship for other researchers. Where do you go?

The University of Washington has its own institutional repository called ResearchWorks.  ResearchWorks is a permanent archiving service for UW faculty and student researchers.  More information about UWB archiving services, including a submission form, can be found on this Campus Library guide.

You may also want to consider archiving your preprints in a disciplinary repository. Amongst the many out there:

Humanities Commons for arts, literature, and digital humanities
SocArXiv  for Social Sciences
PsyArXiv for Psychological sciences
EngrXiv  for Engineering
PubMedCentral (PMC) for the biomedical and life sciences
ArXiv for Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Quantitative Biology, Quantitative Finance and Statistics

Check out OpenDOAR if you want to search for more repositories in your field, or search within repositories.

If you have additional questions, please contact Sarah Leadley, Campus Library Director, at leadley@uw.edu.

__________________________

References & Resources:
SHERPA on preprints: http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeoinfo.html#prepostprints

 

Understanding Your Author Rights, Part Two

In a previous post, we discussed the importance of understanding, retaining, and exercising your author rights when you’re publishing your work. But what about your earlier publications? If you’re unsure which rights the publisher permitted you to retain and/or can’t find a copy of your Author Agreement or Copyright Transfer Agreement, the following resources may help.

Finding Information Online

RoMEO, managed by SHERPA services out of the UK, is “a searchable database of publisher’s policies regarding the self-archiving of journal articles on the web and in Open Access repositories.” (RoMEO FAQ). You can search by a journal’s title, ISSN, or publisher to find information regarding the journal’s open access options and self-archiving policies, the key information included in the publisher’s boilerplate Copyright Transfer Agreement (CTA). RoMEO entries often include publisher contact information.

RoMEO’s data also powers other services such as http://rchive.it/.  Like RoMEO, searching for a journal or publisher will yield information regarding OA and self-archiving policies, but adds explanatory and contextual information designed to assist authors in understanding the fine print.

Contacting the Publisher Directly

In our experience, most publishers are very responsive when it comes to answering authors’ questions regarding permissible uses of their work. While few may be willing to alter a CTA post-publication, it’s not unheard of for specific requests to be honored on a case-by-case basis.

If RoMEO doesn’t include a journal or provide the publisher’s contact information, Ulrichsweb is a good next step. The online directory includes all available contact information for the over 300,000 journals and serials indexed.

If you need additional assistance, we’re here to help! Contact Sarah Leadley, leadley@uw.edu, with your questions.

References & Resources:

 

Predatory Journal Publishing

Does this sound familiar? A new message appears in your inbox: the Questionable Journal of Mysterious Origins wants to publish your research! They promise a quick turnaround time and wide readership, increasing the potential impact of your work, all for the low, low price of $300-$3000! But is this really a deal you can’t refuse?

Predatory journal publishing is an increasingly pressing issue in higher education. A study out of Finland reports a significant increase in the number of articles published in predatory journals since 2010. Stories range from the sad, as marginalized scholars succumb to the pressure of publish-or-perish, to the absurd, with Marge Simpson’s foray into computer science. Most recently, the FTC is taking action, filing a civil complaint against one particularly large and pernicious predatory publisher.

What is predatory publishing and why is it spreading? Predatory publishers take advantage of the upsurge in gold Open Access (OA), a digital, peer-reviewed journal publishing model that offers free, online, public access to research, often, though not always, by transferring publishing costs to the author (via Article Processing Charges, or APCs). Many legitimate and highly competitive peer-reviewed journals (such as PLoS Biology and IEEE Access) operate under the gold OA model and levy APCs, which are frequently covered by research funders rather than individual authors. Open access has gained so much traction that, in 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy directed federal agencies to develop public access plans, requiring recipients of federal funding to make both their articles and data publically accessible.

With any growing and potentially profitable market, however, comes the opportunity for scammers to exploit the system. Predatory publishers establish charlatan gold OA journals, charging APCs and producing online issues, without establishing or engaging in a rigorous peer review and editorial process. Essentially, they’re designed to take your money and run, copying and pasting your unedited work into poorly designed websites that, at best, may one day be crawled by Google Scholar. Yikes.

So, how does one filter out the sham journals from the legitimate publications? Jeffrey Beall of the University of Colorado Denver has long produced a directory of predatory journals known as Beall’s List. While this may be a good place to start, it must also be mentioned that Beall and his List have come under criticism of late for some arguably extreme anti-OA views. Furthermore, York University librarian John Dupuis and Barbara Fister from Inside Higher Ed point out that the obvious spam-like efforts documented by Beall and others distract us from the real problem: more underhanded and mainstream predatory practices employed by corporate publishers like Elsevier and Wiley.

Thus, as always and with any source, we recommend practicing what we preach to our students: think critically, evaluate, and verify. CUNY librarians Monica Berger and Jill Cirasella laid out the case for this more well-rounded approach, and both Grand Valley State University Library and the Directory of Open Access Journals have published comprehensive quality indicators to be used as part of a holistic review process. Authors can also enjoy all the advantages of open access while circumventing these concerns by opting for green OA, publishing their article in the journal of their choice and depositing a pre- or post-print copy in UW’s institutional repository, ResearchWorks.

Interested in publishing in a gold OA journal but hoping to avoid the pitfalls? Your subject librarians are here to help!

Understanding Your Author Rights, Part One

After the years-long process of proposing the project, collecting the data, analyzing the data, and positing conclusions, you are finally ready to share your findings with the world. But do you know what rights you have to your work, both before, during, and after you submit your research for publication?

BEFORE

Even if you have yet to make your research public, it is protected under copyright. This gives you, the creator, the exclusive right to:

  • Distribute
  • Reproduce
  • perform and/or display publicly
  • and modify your work.

DURING

Once accepted for publication, most publishers require that you sign a Publication or Copyright Transfer Agreement (CTA). Many journals use boilerplate CTAs that often ask authors to sign over their copyright wholesale. This is a problem if you hope to:

  • Use sections of or build off your research in later works;
  • Distribute copies of your article to colleagues or students; and/or
  • Upload your article to a personal or institutional website.

The good news: CTAs are negotiable, as publishers technically do not need the full copyright in order to legally publish your work. The publisher needs:

  • The non-exclusive right to publish, distribute, and receive financial return from your article;
  • To receive attribution as the journal of first publication; and
  • Permission to migrate your article to any future formats and include in collections.

With those rights granted, you retain:

  • The right to re-use and build on your work without restrictions;
  • The ability to increase access, shareability, and citations by sharing your work online; and
  • Your attribution and citation rights as the author.

A simple way to negotiate your rights is to fill out and attach the SPARC Author Addendum (http://www.sparc.arl.org/sites/default/files/Access-Reuse_Addendum.pdf) to the CTA provided by your publisher.   Even if the publisher does not sign the addendum, publication of your article represents tacit acceptance of addendum terms.

It is also important to remember that many organizations providing grant funding also require certain types of access, archiving, and data sharing. You can easily check the requirements of major funding organizations by using SHERPA/JULIET, a UK-based database that is searchable by funder name or country of origin.

AFTER

Depending on the specifics of your CTA, you can archive a pre-print, post-print, or publisher’s version of your article in ResearchWorks, University of Washington’s online institutional repository. Doing so will increase access to and visibility of your work and provide you with a permanent, stable URL to your article.

If you need additional assistance, we’re here to help! Contact Sarah Leadley, leadley@uw.edu, with your questions.

References & Resources:

Open Access and Public Scholarship

Open Access and Public Scholarship

Open access and public scholarship are often complementary approaches to engaged research, teaching, and practice. Next week for Open Access Week, the UW LIbraries is hosting two events highlighting the work of UW scholars who provide open access to their research and/or work in the area of public scholarship. Both events include UW Bothell faculty, and we are pleased to be able to offer streaming access on the Bothell campus. These events are part of the Libraries’ Hacking the Academy program series, a year-long conversation about digital scholarship.

Please join us in the Campus Library, room LB2-318, for live streaming of the following events:

Monday, October 24, 2016, 4:00-5:00 Hacking the Academy: Simpson Center for the Humanities 2016 Digital Humanities Summer Fellows Showcase Learn more about the Simpson Center Digital Humanities Summer Fellowship program and hear three 2016 Summer Fellows talk about their work.

  • Darren Byler (Anthropology) – The Art of Life in Chinese Central Asia: A Repertoire of Uyghur and Han Migrant Popular Culture
  • Josephine Ensign (Psychosocial & Community Health) – Soul Stories: Health and Healing through Homelessness
  • Minda Martin (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)Seattle’s Freeway Revolt

Wednesday, October 26, 2016, 4:00-5:00 Hacking the Academy: Open in Action Celebrate Open Access Week by hearing how faculty on-campus are working to keep their work open. We’ll begin the program with some short talks followed by time for discussion around the theme “open in action.” Come ready to learn and share your ideas!

  • Rachel Arteaga, Assistant Program Director for Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics, Simpson Center for the Humanities, speaking on public scholarship
  • Steven Roberts, Kenneth K. Chew Endowed Professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, speaking on open science
  • Dan Berger, Assistant Professor of Comparative Ethnic Studies at UW Bothell, speaking on public scholarship
  • Justin Marlowe, Endowed Professor of Public Finance and Civic Engagement, and Associate Dean for Executive Education Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, speaking on designing an open textbook

We’d also like to highlight some other UW Bothell open access and public scholarship projects, heading into Open Access Week. The Campus Library partners with UW Bothell faculty to develop a range of open access digital scholarship projects with connections to the community and engaged research. Some recent projects include the following:

Social Justice & Diversity Archive
Research and scholarship documenting the history and work of social justice organizations in the Pacific Northwest.
Faculty: Julie Shayne, Senior Lecturer, Faculty Coordinator, Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies
School of Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Northwest Prison Archive (forthcoming) –
Interviews, documents, and new scholarship related to the carceral state in the Pacific Northwest
Faculty: Dan Berger, Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Community Voices: Oral Histories at the University of Washington Bothell
Oral histories conducted by – and with – University of Washington Bothell students, staff, faculty, and community members, including histories of international students, students with disabilities, founders of UWave Radio, staff who maintain campus facilities
Faculty: Jill Freidberg, Lecturer, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Wetlands Collection
Documentation of the restoration, current use, and ongoing evolution of the UW Bothell/Cascadia College Wetlands
Faculty: Warren Gold, Associate Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, UW Bothell

Please let us know if you would like more information about any of these projects, or would like to discuss your own open access/public scholarship with us.

See you next week in LB2-318!

 

 

Why Open Access?

Why Open Access?

We engage and invest in research in order to encourage innovation and creativity, enrich education, and accelerate the pace of discovery.  Communication of the results of research is an essential component of the research process, and enabling broad, unfettered access to new knowledge plays a key role in ensuring that the scholarly publishing system supports the needs of scholars and the academic enterprise as a whole.

Yet because of cost barriers or use restrictions, research results are often not available to the full community of potential users.  The Internet gives us the opportunity to bring this information to a worldwide audience at virtually no marginal cost and allows us to use it in new, innovative ways. This has resulted in a new framework: Open Access.

What is open access and why does it matter?  Materials published in an open access journal or digital repository are available online to anyone anywhere for download and use without restrictions or payment by the user.  There are many benefits to a system of open access scholarship:

  • Research is more accessible and useable.
  • Articles published open access may be cited more and be more influential than those that have not.
  • Institutions that support research – from public and private research funders to higher education institutions – are implementing policies that encourage (and in some instances require) researchers to make research generated from their funding openly accessible to and fully useable by the public.
  • Researchers have access to scholarship regardless of institutional affiliation.
  • Students have access to scholarship after they graduate.
  • Scholarly conversations are advanced through broader participation.
  • Creative work and new discoveries are encouraged as scholars can build on open research.

OA at the UW: In April 2009, the UW Faculty Senate approved a Class C Resolution on Scholarly Publishing Alternatives and Authors’ Rights,  encouraging faculty to publish in “moderately priced journals, in journals published by professional societies and associations, or in peer-reviewed ‘open access’ journals,” and to archive their work in open access repositories.  In 2015 the Senate advanced this work via another resolution, Concerning the UW Open Access Repository & Request for Advice on an Open Access Policy, which requested that a UW Open Access Policy be drafted for review by the faculty. This work is ongoing, more on this to come!

Additional Resources:

Fair Use Week

February 22-26 is Fair Use Week, an annual event designed to highlight and promote further understanding of this important doctrine. In brief, fair use is a legal means of balancing the exclusive rights granted to authors and creators (as outlined in U.S. Copyright Law) with the ability of the public to use and benefit from copyrighted works without acquiring prior permission from the copyright holder. The judicious application of fair use enables you to publish an article including excerpted texts from other scholars and provide selected readings to your students via Canvas. In other words, fair use is invaluable to all of our work in higher education!

Determining whether your desired use is a fair use requires an evaluation of the four fair use factors: purpose and character of the use, the nature of the copyrighted work, the amount and substantiality of the work used, and the effect of the use on the potential market. This can feel like a daunting task, since the flexibility inherent to fair use means there is no single, correct answer; rather, each use falls somewhere along a spectrum of “less likely to be a fair use” to “more likely to be a fair use.” Generally speaking, uses for the purpose of nonprofit education, scholarship, and research are favored as fair uses, particularly if that use is “transformative” (using the original work for a new and different purpose and/or resulting in the creation of an entirely new work) and of a defined, limited scope.

Thankfully, there are several resources available to guide you through this evaluation process. The Center for Social and Media Impact at American University has collaborated with various communities to create best practices tailored to different situational and disciplinary contexts. The American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy produced a Fair Use Evaluator tool to walk you through each factor step-by-step. And if you prefer a more personalized approach, your librarian is happy to help you think through the various issues at play for your particular use (with the important caveat that we are not lawyers and do not provide legal advice).

You can learn more about fair use and its applications via this handy infographic or the Campus Library’s Copyright Resource Guide. Happy Fair Use Week!

*some information adapted from NYU Libraries’ Copyright guide

Learn about: Open Media

Open media is open access, public domain, or licensed-for-reuse video, images, sound, or multimedia. Like other open access content, open media is available for all scholars, students, and the public to incorporate into study, teaching, research, scholarship, creative work, projects, and other uses. In an environment of multimodal digital scholarship and open access values, open media is an increasingly important part of the open access landscape.

Many museums, archives, respositories, and other cultural institutions make the materials in their collections available online without restrictions on reuse. Individuals also contribute to the availability of open media by sharing their work online with a Creative Commons license or public domain designation. Consider publishing and sharing your own media productions with a CC or public domain designation so other scholars and the public know how they can use and build on your work.

Our Open Media Resources guide can help you find open media, and connect you to important open media resources such as openGLAM and the Open Culture blog. Let us know if you have questions or need more information!