Implications of tourism in Tanzania

My study abroad experience was wonderful.There is no way I will be able to fully express it through writing.The full extent of my experience and feelings will remain with me in memory. During my journey I kept a detailed personal journal to document my experience. I may not include all the details in this particular essay. However, I will try to express some things.

I boarded the plane headed to Kenya, my home country about a week before my study abroad. Kenya was absolutely wonderful. I reconnect with family that I had not seen in eight to ten years. I visited my grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins. Although it was many years since I have been to Kenya, talking and interacting with family was as if resuming a conversation that had just been put on pause for a while, as if no time had passed between the time I last met them. I reconnected back with family instantly.They were all ecstatic to see me again. I had missed them much, they had missed me much. I travelled from Nairobi to Nyandarua to Mombasa, to Kapsabet. Kenya has changed and grown a lot, it’s wonderful! I truly cannot express the joy and experience I had in Kenya. Look at the photos and see, these memories and feelings will remain with me.
After my week in Kenya, I boarded a bus headed to Arusha, Tanzania. The traveling time was about four hours. The view was wonderful, hills,plains and wild animals spread out. A student who was part of the study abroad group had decided to visit Kenya also. So we decided to take the bus together. Four hours later we arrived and got picked up and driven to where we were to stay.

During the first four days, we were hosted by small college. During this time, we explored the environment to get a feel of Tanzania. The rest of the students got a small crash course in Swahili, since I already knew Swahili, I helped them out a bit.
After that week, we started to travel to different parts of Tanzania. Most of out time in Tanzania was spent exploring and discussion. We started in Maji ya Chai we traveled to Arusha National park to Lake Natron Conservation to Serengeti National Park to Ngorongoro Conservation Area to Loliondo. We were not in a formal classroom. We learned about the discourse surround ecotourism. About the Positives vs negatives of ecotourism.

The positive aspects ecotourism is that wild animals are conserved and not invaded upon by humans and people get an opportunity to visit wild life. However, there is a down side to ecotourism. First, animals are glorified more that people. When tourists go to Africa, they mostly only go on Safari to see animals, yet they never take the time to actually interact and know the people in Africa. When tourists go to Europe, they go and see human creation, human architecture, when tourist visit Africa, they only go to see wild life. Negative stereotypes concerning Africa emerge due a lack of interaction and understand of African people on part of the tourist. Second, tourism lodges are so expensive that only rich people, mostly from Europe and America can afford. Third, the conservation areas were designated and made by European nations, it’s not the Tanzanian government who made the conservation areas. This shown the colonialist connotation that the conservation areas have. Who said that European nations are the only ones who know how to conserve and take care of animals? Animals are designated such as huge area of land by the guidelines of European counties, while the Maasai people’s land is getting snatched away from them by conservation workers and investors. That is ridiculous. No one tells Europe and America what to do with their land. As we were speaking with the Maasai people of Tanzania, we leaned that the Maasai have their own mechanics on how they protect and conserve the animals. Each clan looks out to conserve a certain type of animal, this is their way to be stewards of the land that they acknowledge was given to them by God. I strongly agree with them.

My favorite part of the experience was meeting the people of Tanzania. I truly do miss the people. I miss the people I met when I went to church. They were so welcoming. Church service was wonderful, just like in Kenya, just like in the U.S. I ate lunch with them, joined their choir practice in the afternoon and was invited to visit by two ladies. I had a wonderful time, I miss them. The members of the Pastoral Woman’s Council (PWC) were great. They are a strong organization that empower their community. There is so much I can say about them, but I need to summarize. The experience I had with them I will never forget. They educate the community regarding money, they educate the community by running a high school, they also fight against injustice regarding land by education the community about their rights.

The students that we met were also wonderful. They reminded me of my experience when I went to school in Kenya. They were very friendly, I made friends with them. We played, laughed and talked together. We played jump rope. I used to do that a lot when I was young. The people that hosted us were also so wonderful. I talked much with them. They directed me on how to get African Style clothing tailored. We spoke about the difference between Tanzania and Kenya. We laughed and made jokes. I really connected with them well. It was great to be with my fellow Africans. There is just something wonderful about being with people like you, people who really get you.

One of my goals is to travel to as many African counties as possible and interact with the wonderful people and see the wonderful treasure that lay in my home continent. After the study abroad ended, my adventure continued. I went back to Kenya to visit more family members. Before I had come for the study abroad, I had visited family in Nairobi and Nyandarua, now after the study abroad, I visited family in Mombasa and Kapsabet. The experience was wonderful, family was ecstatic to meet me again, we instantly reconnected. I was there for a about a week, time flew by so fast and soon I boarded the plane heading back the USA, my immediate family was missing me. I will never forget this wonderful experiences. I thank God for giving me this opportunity.

After I came back from my trip to Kenya and Tanzania, I was very glad to see my immediate family, but I missed my extended family. I also missed the people I had met in Tanzania. Although I am not there, memories will still remain.

Reflecting on my experience in Brazil

Reflecting is very important so that I can process and remember my experience. There are many things that I learned concerning Brazilian culture. Some activities that are memorable to me are such as the Capoeira workshop/kids’ performance, the workshop where we learned how to play African instruments such as the drums, our visit to the Remanso community Quilombo, our visit to Steve Biko (of which I spoke about in first reflection) and our visit to the Afro-Brazilian clothing studio.

It was interesting to learn about Capoeira’s history. Capoeira is a combination of dance and fight. It was used as a form of self-defense for enslaved Africans during the time on slavery. This knowledge of the history and background and significance of the moves made our encounter with Capoeira more valuable as we learned some moves during the workshop and as we watched the kids play it. Because Capoeira is now used only as an art form and not a self-defense mechanism, it would be interesting in the future to see if Capoeira ever changes significantly throughout time. It was interesting also to play the African instruments. I have never played them before. I particularly liked the shakers. They are so simple, yet can make complex sounds. African things are impressive, even the “simplest” things are so beautifully complex if you look long enough. The visit to the Remanso community Quilombo, was also very valuable. It was great to learn about the strong communities that runway slaves created. I love hearing stories of resistance against oppression, we do not hear resistance stories often enough. It was great to hear from the brother and sister that spoke to us about their personal life-stories. I love listening to peoples’ life-journeys, so that was great.

Although I enjoyed all these activities, I will compare only one of these activities to my culture. I am Kenyan as you already know. I will comment on the activity concerning the visit when we met Goya Lopes who talked to us about Afro-Brazilian fashion. It was very interesting to see the whole process of cloth-making, but one of the most enjoyable aspects of this event was seeing the final product after everything was put together. I have many African clothing but until then I had not had the chance to see how the process of putting the African prints onto the fabric works. This was a good opportunity for me. (I am actually wearing one African shirt right now as I write this essay; I did not plan this, what a coincidence). The process begins with an artist dreaming up an Africa-inspired print design. Then the artist draws the print design on paper. Then that drawing is transferred to digital form on a computer making it possible for the design to be reproduced multiple times and in desired sizes. Then another machine (I am not sure of the name) is used to copy the digitized image onto a nylon-saturated-screen which is the sprayed with water to clean off part that are not part of the design. The next step is for two individuals to put paint over the screen which is placed over the fabric copying the design onto the fabric. Then the paint is dried and stays on the fabric. The designs we saw made were typical African style. I know this; I have seen many African print clothing. The different prints really give character to the clothing. Then the style of the outfit itself is the finishing touch of the art work. African clothing is so distinct and beautiful.

Like I said before, this was a good opportunity for me because I got the see the process of putting the African prints onto fabric. This experience complemented an experience I had in my study abroad in Tanzania last year. This experience I had in Tanzania is similar to what would have happened if I was in Kenya, let me explain. While I was in Tanzania, I got African-style cloths made by a seamstress. These cloths were not ready-made cloths that one buys at the store. These cloths were made specifically for me. I went to a store that sold African-style-prints fabric (like the fabrics we saw made in Brazil), and I chose and bought the fabric that had the designs and colors that I liked. Then I took the fabric to the seamstress. She measured my size, I gave here the style I had searched and liked, she took note and she together with her assistants made me the cloths. The cloths were beautiful and very well done. Like I said, when it comes to clothing, Kenyan and Tanzanian style and process of making are similar, that is why I said that this experience I had in Tanzania is similar to what would have happened if I was in Kenya. When people want African-styled clothing, many people prefer to choose the prints and fabrics they like then they personally go and get fitted and their cloths made by the seamstress instead of buying ready-made clothing like in a mall. In Tanzanian (which is similar to Kenya) I got to choose and buy the print design and fabric I wanted, I chose the particular style of the outfit itself that I wanted (unlike ready-made cloths such as in malls). My experience in Tanzania (which is similar to Kenya) complements my experience in Brazil because while Brazil, I got to see how artists design the prints to the point where the print designs are put on fabric. While in Tanzania I saw how the customer chooses the print design they like to the point where they have the cloths made. These two experiences got me to understand the full process from the point the design is born in the artists mind to the point where the customer is wearing the design.
One of the difficult aspects of this event was the fact that the country’s economy had negatively affected the business making it impossible to have more artists working together. But one thing that was good to hear was the fact that the artist has workshops that expose people to her work to inspire them, especially kids. At least that’s a positive thing despite the economic hardships.

African and African-inspired clothing is truly beautiful, unique and distinct. I am proud to own and wear my African clothing. The clothing represents the beautiful imagination, creativity and artistic talents of my people.

Here are some photos of my experience in Brazil:

Uplifting/heartbreaking aspects of Brazil

As I wrote on my application to this study abroad program, my aim is to explore Black people’s history and culture by visiting as many places with Black people around the world as possible. Coming to Brazil and specifically Salvador that has the biggest population of Black people outside of Africa has been very eye opening for me. This place is reminiscent of my country Kenya. The friendliness and warmth, people are genuinely interested in talking and interacting with one another. As in Kenya, people in Brazil are outside interacting with one another. Marketplaces are loud and busy. Kids play outside, people buy food by the roadside, the streets are buzzing with activity. This is very different from Seattle. It is so beautiful and sweet to come and be so hugged and kissed by the host mom and by other people. Personal space here is minimal, people like to be close and personal while interacting. This friendliness and warmth is the same as in Kenya, except people do not kiss as part of greetings in Kenya. Although I am not able to interact with people here as much as I would like to due to the language barrier (unlike in my Tanzanian study abroad), I none the less have learned much through observation and experience. I see how lively and friendly the people are. From the taxi drivers to the cashiers to the street vendors to the people at the beaches. I have experienced the genuine hospitality that my host family has provided for me. My host mom has been great. We have been able to communicate mostly via Google translator. Although communication has been of a different nature (gestures and google translator) due to the language barrier, I have still enjoyed my interactions with her. She has really taken care of me while I have been sick. She has gone above and beyond.

Some parts of my experience in Brazil has been heartbreaking and some parts uplifting. It has been heartbreaking to hear concerning the cruel history of slavery and of the racism that is currently present. However, one part of this experience has been uplifting was when we went to the Steve Biko NGO. It was great to hear of the hard work that people are doing to combat racism.

One of the things they do that stood out to me was the class they teach that is focused on Black awareness. It is great and important that they are combating eurocentric education by educating the students about Black ideas, history and cultures. Eurocentric education is very damaging because it presents a skewed view that looks down on and minimizes other people such as Black and Indigenous people, giving undue emphasis on European points of view.

The difficult part of this event was listening to the experiences that people had concerning racism. The story about the black lady that was unduly asked by the boss to make coffee simply because she was black while that was not part of the job description. The other story was of the black professor who was barely recognized as a professor simply because of his color. This particular event did not place me out of my comfort zone because I have had many conversation concerning race in the U.S. I knew what expect, however I will never be used to the heartbreak of these stories. Talking about race issues will never be easy. When it comes to my country Kenya, race is not an issue because most people are black (there are many Asian and Indian immigrants there now, but Kenya is majority Black people). The issues with Kenya have to do with ethnicity. People can be discriminated upon based on their tribe. I cannot give much detail on this because I immigrated to the U.S almost ten years ago when I was young. However, I do know that tribalism is a big issue in Kenya. Just as in Brazil, there are organizations in Kenya as there are also in U.S that are trying to help communities overcome discrimination and help better the society. In the future, I would like to learn if and how Brazilian history books would be corrected to present the correct unbiased non-eurocentric history. As long as people are misinformed, attempts to better the society will not work. Apart from lessons concerning slavery and colonization, Black people need to be taught about their great history and about their great contributions to society. This kind of education is necessary to act as a mirror example to show that Black people can be successful because the were also in the past. This education is necessary in order for Black people to get a better and fuller understanding of who we are so we can be inspired to succeed more and reach to greater heights.

My Study Abroad Experience

My study abroad experience was wonderful. There is no way I will be able to fully express it through writing.The full extent of my experience and feelings will remain with me in memory. During my journey I kept a detailed personal journal to document my experience. I may not include all the details in this particular essay. However, I will try to express some things.

I boarded the plane headed to Kenya, my home country about a week before my study abroad. Kenya was absolutely wonderful. I reconnect with family that I had not seen in eight to ten years. I visited my grandparents, uncles, aunts and cousins. Although it was many years since I have been to Kenya, talking and interacting with family was as if resuming a conversation that had just been put on pause for a while, as if no time had passed between the time I last met them. I reconnected back with family instantly.They were all ecstatic to see me again. I had missed them much, they had missed me much. I travelled from Nairobi to Nyandarua to Mombasa, to Kapsabet. Kenya has changed and grown a lot, it’s wonderful! I truly cannot express the joy and experience I had in Kenya. Look at the photos and see, these memories and feelings will remain with me.
After my week in Kenya, I boarded a bus headed to Arusha, Tanzania. The traveling time was about four hours. The view was wonderful, hills,plains and wild animals spread out. A student who was part of the study abroad group had decided to visit Kenya also. So we decided to take the bus together. Four hours later we arrived and got picked up and driven to where we were to stay.
During the first four days, we were hosted by small college. During this time, we explored the environment to get a feel of Tanzania. The rest of the students got a small crash course in Swahili, since I already knew Swahili, I helped them out a bit.
After that week, we started to travel to different parts of Tanzania. Most of out time in Tanzania was spent exploring and discussion. We started in Maji ya Chai we traveled to Arusha National park to Lake Natron Conservation to Serengeti National Park to Ngorongoro Conservation Area to Loliondo. We were not in a formal classroom. We learned about the discourse surround ecotourism. About the Positives vs negatives of ecotourism.
The positive aspects ecotourism is that wild animals are conserved and not invaded upon by humans and people get an opportunity to visit wild life. However, there is a down side to ecotourism. First, animals are glorified more that people. When tourists go to Africa, they mostly only go on Safari to see animals, yet they never take the time to actually interact and know the people in Africa. When tourists go to Europe, they go and see human creation, human architecture, when tourist visit Africa, they only go to see wild life. Negative stereotypes concerning Africa emerge due a lack of interaction and understand of African people on part of the tourist. Second, tourism lodges are so expensive that only rich people, mostly from Europe and America can afford. Third, the conservation areas were designated and made by European nations, it’s not the Tanzanian government who made the conservation areas. This shown the colonialist connotation that the conservation areas have. Who said that European nations are the only ones who know how to conserve and take care of animals? Animals are designated such as huge area of land by the guidelines of European counties, while the Maasai people’s land is getting snatched away from them by conservation workers and investors. That is ridiculous. No one tells Europe and America what to do with their land. As we were speaking with the Maasai people of Tanzania, we leaned that the Maasai have their own mechanics on how they protect and conserve the animals. Each clan looks out to conserve a certain type of animal, this is their way to be stewards of the land that they acknowledge was given to them by God. I strongly agree with them.
My favorite part of the experience was meeting the people of Tanzania. I truly do miss the people. I miss the people I met when I went to church. They were so welcoming. Church service was wonderful, just like in Kenya, just like in the U.S. I ate lunch with them, joined their choir practice in the afternoon and was invited to visit by two ladies. I had a wonderful time, I miss them. The members of the Pastoral Woman’s Council (PWC) were great. They are a strong organization that empower their community. There is so much I can say about them, but I need to summarize. The experience I had with them I will never forget. They educate the community regarding money, they educate the community by running a high school, they also fight against injustice regarding land by education the community about their rights. The students that we met were also wonderful. They reminded me of my experience when I went to school in Kenya. They were very friendly, I made friends with them. We played, laughed and talked together. We played jump rope. I used to do that a lot when I was young. The people that hosted us were also so wonderful. I talked much with them. They directed me on how to get African Style clothing tailored. We spoke about the difference between Tanzania and Kenya. We laughed and made jokes. I really connected with them well. It was great to be with my fellow Africans. There is just something wonderful about being with people like you, people who really get you. One of my goals is to travel to as many African counties as possible and interact with the wonderful people and see the wonderful treasure that lay in my home continent. After the study abroad ended, my adventure continued. I went back to Kenya to visit more family members. Before I had come for the study abroad, I had visited family in Nairobi and Nyandarua, now after the study abroad, I visited family in Mombasa and Kapsabet. The experience was wonderful, family was ecstatic to meet me again, we instantly reconnected. I was there for a about a week, time flew by so fast and soon I boarded the plane heading back the USA, my immediate family was missing me. I will never forget this wonderful experiences. I thank God for giving me this opportunity.

Pre-Departure

Blog by Esther Wambui Ndungu, Pre-Major (Business), Critical Perspectives on Ecotourism in Tanzania

Esther IASA 2

As I was looking through the Study Abroad program countries listed on the school website, I knew I was interested in studying abroad in Africa, particular Kenya, where I am originally from. However, the program in Kenya had to do with medical work, something not in my field of my interest. So I looked for another Study Abroad opportunity in a different African county, Tanzania.

The name of the program I will be participating in is Critical Perspectives on Ecotourism in Tanzania. Although we will focus on Ecotourism implications on the Tanzania, we will also focus on Community Development. That is where my field of interest is. I am currently starting my sophomore year this summer quarter. My intended major in Business Administration. I want to focus on Community Development as a Social Entrepreneur. Study Abroad is a great way for me to travel and get insight on how people work to make the world a better place. During the program, we will be meeting with different grassroots organizations and leaders of the community. I will get an hands-on education, beyond the textbook. When I come back to US, I will continue getting hands-on learning through Community Based Learning.

Another valuable part of this Study Abroad experience is the fact that I will be able to experience a different culture and perspective on life. This is paramount in order of me to be a well rounded person. It will be so refreshing to be outside of US for a few weeks, about one and a half months. I will also be able to go back to my country Kenya before and after the program. Nairobi, Kenya is about four and a half hours bus ride away from Arusha, Tanzania. I plan on landing in Kenya five day before the program, spend time with family, then bus to Tanzania for the Study Abroad program, the bus back to Kenya, visit family for six days, then fly back to US. I am so exited to see my extended family again. Kenya will be so different than I had left it almost nine years ago. It is going to be wonderful! I get to travel to two different countries, that is a big plus! I will be back a day before school starts, I know I will be exhausted from the flight, but I don’t want to come back any earlier.

I will make friends with the Tanzanian host culture very well. I already know Swahili, because I am Kenyan, and so it will be much easier for me to connect with them at a deeper level. I do not have any fears or anxiety for participating in this Study Abroad program. I am looking forward to the trip of a lifetime!