August 31- September 4, 2017

Giant River Otter saying Hello!

Over the next few days we continued to learn more basics about our surroundings. We learned the dominant plant and insect families because they are both very important, and very abundant, in the amazon rainforest. They are equally as important for the ecosystems because they are the primary producers and primary consumers for the rest of the ecosystem. We also continued to explore the environment we were living in through nature walks or through canoeing in the mornings. The giant river otters came to investigate our canoes one morning!

Releasing my first bird

Later in the week we started discussing research techniques for ecology. One that was very important to me was mist netting because we were in the bird research group. We learned how to set up mist nets to capture birds and I was pleasantly surprised how much I liked doing it and I liked seeing the birds up close to take measurements and pictures. I would not have considered myself a bird person before this trip because I had no background with it, but they were starting to grow on me. We got further into our research project and our group got to start handling the birds a bit more and that was fun, but bird research is an early task! Birds are most active in the mornings, so we went to open mist nets at dawn every morning.

I was starting to get used to CC life, and I was really enjoying my time there. I was surprised my back wasn’t hurting from sleeping on my sleeping pad for so long, but it continued to be fine the rest of the trip as well. I was also getting used to the heat, and sweating in full length cloths all day. It wasn’t bad because everyone could relate to what you were experiencing. Once you started to relax about the atmosphere you were able to enjoy it much more. You could appreciate all the life around you and listen to all the sounds of the jungle. My favorite part was waking up in the dark mornings and listening to all the sounds. You would hear howler monkeys, birds, and a lot of bugs, but they all played together into this indescribable symphony. That is what I will miss the most now that I am home. The sounds were unlike anything I have ever heard before, it was incredible.

Band Tailed Manakin

August 26-August 30, 2017

Back from Peru and I would not trade that experience for anything. It was an amazing month full of once in a lifetime experiences that I got to share with many wonderful people along the way. I will be blogging about my time in five or so day chucks to try and go over some of my best memories and lessons I learned. A month is a long time to try to catch up on, so I will do my best (luckily we were required to journal for the program!). I am a very visual person, so my blog will be full of pictures! Enjoy!

 

August 26-August 30:

We made it to Cusco, Peru a couple days ago and had some time to acclimate to the elevation. Brianna and I slept a lot and drank lots of Coca tea to ease our aliments.  We met our group on the 26th at noon and got to know everyone a little more and get our schedule figured out. Then the next morning we were off to start our adventure!

The next three days consisted of our group busing and boating to reach Cocha Cashu Biological Station.  The first day was a 14 hour bus ride from Cusco to Atalaya where we spent the night. This is a picture of the view when we reached the highest point of the Andes we were crossing. Also here is a map to help track where we were!

View into the amazon basin from the highest point we would hit in the Andes

Then the next two days were 8 hour beautiful boat rides along the Madre de Dios and Manu rivers. The boat rides were full of bird and other animal’s sightings along the way. We also had a chance to talk about river dynamics which was fun to learn about while we were in it and navigating the shallow waterways.  We spent one night at a ranger station called Limonal where we camped, and then we were up early for another day of boat riding on the Manu River! Here are a few pictures I captured along my way to Cocha Cashu, there were a lot more, but these are my favorite!

Sunrise on the Manu River

Capybaras!

Oropendola nests

We finally reached Cocha Cashu (CC) late on the 29th and we quickly set up our tents and had dinner and we were off to bed. The first few night in the amazon were the hardest. It was hot and humid, and we were advised to wear long pants, long sleeves, and boots at all times of the day. Sweating was pretty constant at most times of the day. Our saving grace was the cold showers. That was my favorite time of the day because I got a break to be normal temperature for a few minutes!

Our first real day at CC was great. I saw spider monkeys in the wild! I was also stung by a bee for the first time in my life because I was trying to balance myself while taking off my rubber boots (Look were you put your hands!! They will tell you this over and over!). The amount of life here is unlike anything I have ever seen and we are so immersed in it because we are camping and limiting our needs for excess. Waking up and going to sleep to the forest sounds was unlike anything you could experience in the United States. The biting bugs I could do without, but they come with the territory, and really they aren’t bad except near water. I am excited to see what the rest of my time here will bring!

Spider Monkey investigating us