UW Farm Greenhouse Internship

Intern­ship Title: UW Farm Green­house Intern (1 posi­tion)                                                   Intern­ship Descrip­tion: The goals of the UW Urban Farm are mul­ti­ple: 1. Pro­vide stu­dents with prac­ti­cal urban farm­ing expe­ri­ence, from plan to pro­duc­tion to table. 2. Pro­vide reli­able, pre­dictable, and qual­ity pro­duc­tion for UW Food Ser­vices. 3. Cre­ate a model of sus­tain­able urban pro­duc­tion at the UW. 4. Link directly to aca­d­e­mic pro­grams in the study of food, includ­ing but not lim­ited to: course­work, inde­pen­dent research, and cap­stone and cul­mi­nat­ing expe­ri­ences. 5. Pro­vide pro­duc­tion for other uses includ­ing but not lim­ited to events, fund-­‐raisers, and gleaning.

In this first full sea­son with the UW Farm Man­ager and the new Mer­cer Court Farm site, stu­dent farm­ers will help develop and deepen the pro­duc­tion rela­tion­ship with Hous­ing and Food Ser­vices, and estab­lish a strong rela­tion­ship with UW Grounds Man­age­ment. The UW Farm Green­house Intern will be involved with all aspects of the green­house at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture, from con­struc­tion to use and best prac­tices. This is an all-­‐weather job. All UW Farm interns are expected to come to work on time and con­sis­tently, rain or shine. Com­mit­ment to the full three quar­ters is required. Interns will report to the Farm Man­ager, who will ensure that the duties of the interns are aligned with the goals of the UW Urban Farm.

Intern­ship Goals:

• Con­tribute to an inte­grated plant­ing plan span­ning the mul­ti­ple plots and prop­er­ties encom­pass­ing the UW Urban Farm. • Work with UW Engi­neers With­out Bor­ders RSO to install a green­house at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture plot. • Assist the Farm Man­ager and UW Engi­neers With­out Bor­ders RSO with con­struc­tion man­age­ment. • Coor­di­nate vol­un­teer efforts at work par­ties and green­house con­struc­tion days • Imple­ment the green­house plant­ing sched­ule from spring through fall • Main­tain the green­house through­out the grow­ing sea­son • Plan and imple­ment a win­ter plant­ing sched­ule. • Plant and tend farm plots at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture, Mer­cer Court, and the Botany Green­house. • Work with Hous­ing and Food Ser­vices staff to develop an under­stand­ing of pro­duc­tion needs, the order-­‐ harvest-­‐delivery process, and to test cul­ti­vars. • In the event of activ­i­ties requir­ing super­vi­sion of minors, a crim­i­nal back­ground check will be con­ducted by the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton. Intern­ship Learn­ing Goals: • Develop farm man­age­ment skills • Gain and develop project man­age­ment and project plan­ning skills • Gain and develop facil­i­ta­tion and nego­ti­a­tion skills • Improve and strengthen com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills • Increase under­stand­ing of how UW admin­is­tra­tive units work.

Hours: 10hrs/week Spring and Fall Quar­ter, 30 hrs/week Sum­mer Quarter

Pay: $11/hour Intern­ship Start Date: 3/31/2014

Intern­ship End Date: 12/5/2014

To apply, sub­mit a resume and cover let­ter to Sarah Geurkink at sgeurk@uw.edu by Mon­day, March 31.

Intern­ship Title: UW Farm Intern (3 posi­tions)                                                                         Intern­ship Descrip­tion: The goals of the UW Urban Farm are multiple:

1. Pro­vide stu­dents with prac­ti­cal urban farm­ing expe­ri­ence, from plan to pro­duc­tion to table. 2. Pro­vide reli­able, pre­dictable, and qual­ity pro­duc­tion for UW Food Ser­vices. 3. Cre­ate a model of sus­tain­able urban pro­duc­tion at the UW. 4. Link directly to aca­d­e­mic pro­grams in the study of food, includ­ing but not lim­ited to: course­work, inde­pen­dent research, and cap­stone and cul­mi­nat­ing expe­ri­ences. 5. Pro­vide pro­duc­tion for other uses includ­ing but not lim­ited to events, fund-­‐raisers, and gleaning.

In this first full sea­son with the UW Farm Man­ager and the new Mer­cer Court Farm site, stu­dent farm­ers will help develop and deepen the pro­duc­tion rela­tion­ship with Hous­ing and Food Ser­vices, and estab­lish a strong rela­tion­ship with UW Grounds Man­age­ment. This is an all-­‐weather job. All UW Farm interns are expected to come to work on time and con­sis­tently, rain or shine. Com­mit­ment to the full three quar­ters is required. Interns will report to the Farm Man­ager, who will ensure that the duties of the interns are aligned with the goals of the UW Urban Farm.

Intern­ship Goals:

• Con­tribute to an inte­grated plant­ing plan span­ning the mul­ti­ple plots and prop­er­ties encom­pass­ing the UW Urban Farm. • Work with UW Grounds Man­age­ment and the Farm Man­ager to design and imple­ment a viable and effec­tive irri­ga­tion sys­tem for rotat­ing farm plots at Mer­cer Court. • Work with UW Engi­neers With­out Bor­ders RSO to install a green­house at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture plot. • Plant and tend farm plots at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture Mer­cer Court, and the Botany Green­house. • Work with Hous­ing and Food Ser­vices staff to develop an under­stand­ing of pro­duc­tion needs, the order-­‐ harvest-­‐delivery process, and to test cul­ti­vars. • Orga­nize farm offices at Mer­cer Court and at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture. • Work with the Office of Sus­tain­abil­ity and Hous­ing and Food Ser­vice Liv­ing, Learn­ing Com­mu­nity staff to develop out­reach tools to inform incom­ing fresh­men and return­ing upper­class­men about the UW Urban Farm. • Work with select fac­ulty to link the prac­ti­cal learn­ing expe­ri­ence oppor­tu­ni­ties avail­able at the UW Urban Farm to aca­d­e­mic course­work. • In the event of activ­i­ties requir­ing super­vi­sion of minors, a crim­i­nal back­ground check will be con­ducted by the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton. Intern­ship Learn­ing Goals: • Develop farm man­age­ment skills • Gain and develop project man­age­ment and project plan­ning skills • Gain and develop facil­i­ta­tion and nego­ti­a­tion skills • Improve and strengthen com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills • Increase under­stand­ing of how UW admin­is­tra­tive units work, in par­tic­u­lar Finance and Facil­i­ties – Grounds Man­age­ment, and Hous­ing and Food Services

Hours: 10hrs/week Spring and Fall Quar­ter, 30 hrs/week Sum­mer Quarter

Pay: $11/hour Intern­ship Start Date: 3/31/2014

Intern­ship End Date: 12/5/2014

To apply, sub­mit a resume and cover let­ter to Sarah Geurkink at sgeurk@uw.edu by Wednes­day, April 2.

Newsletter Feb 10–16

Hello Farm­ers,
 
Here’s what’s going on around the Farm:
Com­post Crew 

The UW Farm is look­ing for­ward to col­lab­o­rat­ing with Cafe Sol­stice by tak­ing its com­post. But we need your help! If you have a car and are will­ing to take com­post from Sol­stice to the Farm on a weekly, biweekly or tri-weekly basis, please con­tact Kay at chaik@uw.edu. Many hands make light work, so we’re look­ing for a few peo­ple to help out!

 
Union Bay Restoration
 
Join us on Sat­ur­day 2/15 for our bi-weekly win­ter work party at Union Bay. Sign up here.

Fer­men­ta­tion Workshop
 
Join us and Johnathan Loritsch from Fire­fly Kitchens March 6th at 6:30pm. We’ll learn how to make kraut, the ben­e­fits and prin­ci­ples of fer­men­ta­tion, taste dif­fer­ent kinds, and make our own batch.
 
The Agri­cul­tural Act of 2014
 
The North­west Farm Bill Action Group presents the Farm Bill 101 Work­shop to edu­cate and pro­mote con­ver­sa­tion about the future of Amer­i­can food and farm­ing pol­icy.Come learn about the new Farm Bill and the his­tory of the Amer­i­can food sys­tem on March 13th from 6 to 7:30pm.
 
 
Food Research at the UW
 
Look­ing for a way to con­nect with oth­ers on cam­pus involved in food-related research? Inter­ested in learn­ing about the skills and assets that exist on cam­pus? Col­lab­o­rat­ing with Strangers work­shops con­nect UW stu­dents, fac­ulty and researchers dur­ing 3-minute speed meet­ings. Par­tic­i­pants exchange and gen­er­ate ideas, build­ing new part­ner­ships to start or improve upon research projects. It might oth­er­wise take you years to meet the peo­ple you’ll con­nect with dur­ing one-on-one con­ver­sa­tions. Reserve your space now
Details
When: Wednes­day, April 30, 2:00 – 4:00 pm
Who: UW stu­dents, fac­ulty, and staff
Where: Research Commons,Ground Floor, Allen Library South
First Plant­ing of 2014
Even with snow on the ground, Farm­ers are farm­ing. Here’s a few pho­tos of our first seeds being sown in the new year!

A Compost Experiment

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UW Farm­ers at the end of com­post mak­ing (pic­ture from Spring 2013)

                  UW Farm­ers, keep mak­ing your com­post. The com­post crew just tested our prod­uct, so we can show you that it works.

When I sent an email to the UW Farm list­serv to enlist help for start­ing toma­toes in Octo­ber 2013, I received a cou­ple of puz­zled responses from our con­cerned vet­eran farmers:

Kay, ya know it’s win­ter right?”

Why are you start­ing toma­toes at this time of the year? Just curious.”

It was not because we were crav­ing greenhouse-grown toma­toes, nor was it because we were in denial of winter’s arrival. It was because we were using tomato plants as our exper­i­men­tal “subjects”.

This exper­i­ment was dove­tail­ing of my research ques­tion and inter­ests with those of our farm man­ager Sarah Geurkink. I was inter­ested in find­ing out whether the com­post that farm­ers have always been mak­ing in our Back Forty actu­ally helps improve soil fer­til­ity. At the same time, Sarah was con­cerned about the impov­er­ished state of the soil at the UW Farm’s new Mer­cer site. Unlike the rich, dark and sweet-smelling soil we have at the Botany Green­house site, where com­post has been added for years, the soil at Mer­cer looked mostly like a mix­ture of dry, grey sand and silt inter­spersed with jaggy lit­tle rocks.

Is it just the look of the soil that dif­fers? Or is it func­tion­ally dif­fer­ent for plant growth as well? The pic­tures here are worth a thou­sand words (although the thou­sand words fol­low for those of you inter­ested in nitty-gritty eco­log­i­cal meth­ods). Mer­cer soil made stunted tomato plants, but even 25% of that soil replaced with UW-grown com­post helped them thrive!

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                  Alright, for those of you who are not inter­ested in nitty-gritties, you can close this page and hap­pily hum a tune as you head to your back­yard and make com­post. For those of you are not con­vinced and want fur­ther evi­dence, what fol­lows is a detailed descrip­tion of what we did to show that com­post­ing is impor­tant. (And to show that unlike what the cyn­ics think, com­post­ing is not just a respon­si­ble way of dis­card­ing unused plant parts).

One of the main things to learn at a uni­ver­sity is crit­i­cal think­ing, not just accept­ing what you’re told, but actu­ally con­fronting and test­ing ideas. Since I wanted to know if com­post mat­ters, I had to do a test. A team of stu­dents got some advice from Pro­fes­sor Jen­nifer Ruesink in Biol­ogy about treat­ments and repli­ca­tion. Green­house Man­ager Doug Ewing pro­vided key insight to help us choose toma­toes as our sub­ject, because they are heavy feed­ers that thrive in fer­tile soil. Their sub­stan­tial need for nutri­ents in the soil will accen­tu­ate any dif­fer­ences in the state of plant growths across soils of dif­fer­ent com­post content.

The exper­i­men­tal set-up that the com­post crew agreed on was as such: we will have four soil con­di­tions, the first being purely Mer­cer soil with­out any amend­ment, fol­lowed by a mix­ture of 75% Mer­cer soil and 25% com­post, a mix­ture of 50% Mer­cer soil and 50% com­post, and finally, just 100% com­post with­out Mer­cer soil. We agreed to have fif­teen repli­cates for each con­di­tion, which meant fif­teen tomato plants in each type of soil con­di­tion. We also agreed to use com­post from the Back Forty at the Botany Green­house site, pro­duced using reg­u­lar heap com­post­ing meth­ods. We were to har­vest the com­post from the pile built way back around the month of April (thank you, spring quar­ter Dirty Dozen!) and also dur­ing the sum­mer (thank you to our sum­mer interns and BIOL240 classmates!).

The tomato plants were all started one after­noon in mid-October. We pre­pared about a hun­dred small rose-pots filled with Sunshine#4 grow­ing mix and sprin­kled sev­eral seeds into each of them. Even though we would even­tu­ally need fewer seedlings, we started more than we needed in order to com­pen­sate for those that would fail to ger­mi­nate or ger­mi­nate poorly. These rose-pots were placed into trans­par­ent plas­tic cups with lids that had small criss­cross cuts at the top to allow some ven­ti­la­tion. After that, we moved all the cups with the rose-pots onto a ther­mal mat to ensure that the tem­per­a­ture will be high enough for ger­mi­na­tion to take place. By week one, each rose-pot had sev­eral tiny seedlings grow­ing in them.

Two weeks later, we divided sixty medium-sized rose-pots into four groups of fif­teen, with each group rep­re­sent­ing one of the four soil con­di­tions men­tioned before­hand. We also labeled all of these rose-pots to keep track of which one con­tained what kind of soil com­po­si­tion. We then care­fully trans­planted tomato seedlings from the small rose-pots into the pre­pared rose-pots, tak­ing care to choose the aver­age healthy-looking seedlings from all those that had ger­mi­nated. We took an ini­tial mea­sure­ment of the heights of the plants not only to record each plant height at the start of the exper­i­ment, but also to allow us to account, in our later data analy­sis, for the dif­fer­ences in how deeply we planted each seedling. We then placed all of the rose-pots con­tain­ing trans­planted seedlings onto a rack in a research area in the Botany Green­house, where they were watered daily by our ded­i­cated green­house staff and com­post crew mem­bers using water with­out fer­til­izer. We made sure that the plants in var­i­ous soil con­di­tions were placed such that no one soil con­di­tion was clus­tered together, so that there will not be a con­found­ing effect of the loca­tion of the rose-pots. For exam­ple, loca­tion could poten­tially affect how much water and light expo­sure each rose-pot gets.

We mea­sured the heights and took pic­tures of the plants (when­ever we remem­bered to bring a cam­era!) once a week for four weeks.

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0% com­post con­di­tion at the end of the 3rd week. Note that when­ever we took pic­tures we grouped the plants of a soil con­di­tion together, but put them back in ran­dom order again after tak­ing pictures.            

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25% com­post con­di­tion at the end of the 3rd week (in tray near­est to camera-woman)

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50% com­post con­di­tion at the end of the 3rd week

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100% com­post at the end of the 3rd week

                  At the end of week four, we took a final height mea­sure­ment and then pre­pared the seedlings for dry weight mea­sure­ments. This was how we did it: we shook the soil off each plant, sep­a­rated the shoot from the root, and then placed each part sep­a­rately into an enve­lope. At the end of the process, we placed all the envelopes into a dry­ing oven. This pro­ce­dure is to dehy­drate the plant parts so that we can take the dry weights of the shoots and roots for plants in each con­di­tion. Our hunch is that nutri­ent stress will be asso­ci­ated with larger root growth rel­a­tive to shoot growth.

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Lola prepar­ing spec­i­mens for dry weight measurements

                  We also set sam­ples of soil water from each soil con­di­tion aside for Electro-Conductivity (EC) mea­sure­ments. To col­lect these sam­ples, we poured some water into a few rose-pots of each con­di­tion and then col­lected the water that ran off. Since the nutri­ents in the soil are usu­ally cations and anions, EC read­ings, by show­ing how well the soil water car­ries elec­tri­cal cur­rent, indi­cates the amount of nutri­ents avail­able in the soil for the plants.

What’s next: We have tons of data, and now we just have to ana­lyze them! For now, we have enough visual “data” to let you decide whether you want to add com­post to your back­yard soil or not.

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Your aver­age tomato plants in var­i­ous con­di­tions at the end of the experiment

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It’s inevitable to have some casu­al­ties that either died of nat­ural cause or in the hands of Kay’s un-nimble fin­gers (wait…What? Hands of fin­gers???) while tak­ing mea­sure­ments. Sorry, plants. I guess they were too eager to be tossed into the com­post pile.

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  0% com­post con­di­tion at the end of the experiment

                  Acknowl­edge­ments: On behalf of the com­post crew I wish to express lots and lots of heart­felt thanks to Pro­fes­sor Jen­nifer Ruesink and our awe­some Green­house Man­ager Doug Ewing, both of whom fig­ured hugely in the con­cep­tu­al­iza­tion of this project and sup­ported us in count­less ways as we attempt for the first time our very own con­trolled exper­i­ment. I also wish to thank the entire green­house staff for their unwa­ver­ing sup­port in tak­ing care of the plants through­out the course of this exper­i­ment. With­out their help, this blog post would have been a reflec­tion on a failed exper­i­ment. I also wish to thank my won­der­ful com­post crew for help­ing me at var­i­ous stages of this exper­i­ment, from start­ing the toma­toes, trans­plant­ing the tomato seedlings into the var­i­ous manip­u­la­tion con­di­tions, water­ing the plants, tak­ing weekly height mea­sure­ments, shoot­ing pic­tures of the plants, to prepar­ing dry spec­i­mens. They are Lola Chevreau, Chi-Yun Lee, Chen Yu-Chiu, Fency, and Ange­line Blattenbauer.

 

Kay

 

 

 

January 6–13 Newsletter

Farm­ers,

Hope every­one has had a won­der­ful win­ter break! Here’s what’s hap­pen­ing in and around the farm these days:

Win­ter Quar­ter Vol­un­teer Hours, begin­ning this week!
Mon­days: 8:30-11am Botany Greenhouse
Tues­days: 2-4pm Mercer
Wednes­days: off
Thurs­days: 2–4 CUH
Fri­days: 12–2 CUH
Every other Sat­ur­day: 10a-3pm, first work party and loca­tions TBA

For those inter­ested in Com­post Crew, a mes­sage from our Com­post Coor­di­na­tor, Kay

Hello farm­ers, the com­post crew will be back in action the 2nd week of the quar­ter! Please vote for a com­post crew meet­ing time: http://www.doodle.com/df9fevfb44qe3y4s”

FarmEd

Dur­ing Win­ter Quar­ter, Farm Ed will be on Mon­days at 8:30–9:30am. There’s no farm ed today, but look­ing ahead to Jan 13, Pro­fes­sor Ruesink will teach us how to test seeds for via­bil­ity and to watch them germinate!

Seed Selec­tion
We’ll be look­ing through cat­a­logues and choos­ing what will grow at the farm this sea­son on Thurs­day the 16th at 7:00pm. Anyone’s wel­come to join, please RSVP to Lexie at lexie.lenae@gmail.com

 

Envi­ron­men­tal Edu­ca­tion Vol­un­teer Opportunity

Leschi Ele­men­tary, a Seat­tle Pub­lic School located in the heart of the Cen­tral Dis­trict, started a new school gar­den Octo­ber 2013.  The kids and par­ents just love it!  How­ever, they need help from vol­un­teers to keep the gar­den grow­ing and to teach the kid­dos essen­tials on basic food grow­ing.  If you love work­ing with kids and you have avail­abil­ity Fri­days through­out the school year, give the gar­den coor­di­na­tor a shout at kblakemo@uw.edu.
 
UW Farm Orientations
Look­ing to fill your Ser­vice Learn­ing require­ments through the Carl­son Cen­ter and the UW Farm? Inter­ested in a quick overview of how to get involved at the farm? Don’t miss our Ori­en­ta­tions, 4-5pm on both Mon­day 1/13 and Tues­day 1/14 at the Mer­cer Court Clubhouse*!
*The Mer­cer Court Farm Club House is on the low­est (clos­est to Pacific) part of the western-most build­ing of the Mer­cer area.  Feel free to call me if you have trou­ble find­ing it (206.550.4169). 
 
Have a great first week of class!

Farm Leadership Positions

We are cur­rently in midst of a flurry of activ­ity and expan­sion and need to fill sev­eral vol­un­teer lead­er­ship posi­tions for the 2013–2014 school year and beyond. There is a range of oppor­tu­ni­ties for moti­vated indi­vid­u­als who want to be more involved with the Farm. No tech­ni­cal expe­ri­ence is required, just a desire to take on a lead­er­ship role, the abil­ity to work with your fel­low farm­ers, and a pas­sion for sus­tain­able agri­cul­ture. The fol­low­ing posi­tions are open to applicants:

Out­reach Coordinator

The Out­reach Coor­di­na­tor posi­tion is part mar­ket­ing, promo and event plan­ner in an effort to pro­mote the Farm on cam­pus. Must work with Site Lead­ers and Social Media Coor­di­na­tor in plan­ning events and cre­ation of pro­mo­tions, includ­ing but not lim­ited to Pizza Bakes, farmer acqui­si­tion, merchandise.

Botany green­house / Dirty Dozen Lead­ers (1–2 people)

The Botany Green­house Coor­di­na­tor man­ages the Farm’s site at the Botany Green­house on cam­pus. Respon­si­bil­i­ties include: coor­di­nat­ing biweekly work hours, FarmEd, and farm lunch. Must be able to coor­di­nate attend events on Tues­day and/or Thurs­day from 8:00-12pm:

  • Tues­day: Botany Green­house work/volunteering from 8:30-12pm.
  • Thurs­day: Potluck breakfast/Farm get-together from 8–8:30am,w/ reg­u­lar guest Pro­fes­sor Ruesink’s FarmEd ses­sions, and on-site work/volunteering from 9:30–11:30.

Mer­cer Court Leader (1–2 people)

Get involved in our newest space! Mer­cer Court is a unique fea­ture on the UW cam­pus that has tremen­dous poten­tial to grow and chal­lenge what we define as urban agri­cul­ture. Mer­cer Court Lead­ers will work along­side the Farm Man­ager, orga­niz­ing vol­un­teers and work par­ties, plan­ning crops to grow and main­tain­ing cur­rent pro­duc­tion. Must be avail­able on Tues­day and Thurs­day between 1-5pm.

Trea­surer

The Trea­sure will work with other Stu­dent Lead­ers and the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton to man­age funds; in addi­tion to cre­at­ing and han­dling order invoices and set­ting pro­duce prices. Must have inter­est in finance, bud­get­ing, and excel­lent Microsoft Excel skills.

Fundrais­ing Coor­di­na­tor (1–2 people)

The Fundrais­ing Coor­di­na­tor will work with the Out­reach Coor­di­na­tor and other Farm­ers to apply for grants, plan fundrais­ing events, and find other fundrais­ing avenues.

Farm Sales Representative

The Farm Sales Rep­re­sen­ta­tive will mar­ket pro­duce grown at the UW Farm to busi­nesses and indi­vid­u­als in our com­mu­nity. Must be inter­ested in busi­ness / mar­ket­ing, able to work alone and in part­ner­ship with busi­ness stu­dents and Trea­surer. Must be orderly and able to work in con­junc­tion with the Uni­ver­sity and learn to write orders and invoices.

Photographer/Designer (1–2 people)

This is your chance to show off your design and photo skills and build a port­fo­lio by cre­at­ing a brand for the Farm. Must be able to attend (some) Farm events to take and edit pho­tos, be pro­fi­cient in a design pro­gram (Pho­to­shop, Illus­tra­tor, etc.), and have a pas­sion to cre­ate. Web dev is a plus.

All posi­tions are vol­un­teer with vary­ing weekly time require­ments based on the needs of the Farm and level of enthu­si­asm of the per­son fill­ing the posi­tion. If you are inter­ested in one of the above posi­tions please sub­mit an appli­ca­tion. Qual­i­fied can­di­dates will be invited to con­tinue the review process.

Early October Check-in

Here’s what’s going on at the Farm:

Mer­cer Court: 
We’ve planted the lower level of the “canyons” with veg­gies (includ­ing gar­lic!) and are almost done plant­ing cover crop in the upper lev­els. Ryan is plant­ing rye for grain in one of the sections–that should be pretty excit­ing. UW Farm bread! Lots of sum­mer ideas being thrown around: run­ner beans run­ning up the stair­case handrails, toma­toes near the dark walls that get nice and hot when the sun hits them. We’d love to talk more with every­one about the plans closer to spring­time (or before)!
CUH
Sum­mer Squash, Cukes and Basil are done for the season–tomatoes on their way out. Our greens, roots, and herbs are going strong. Cover crop is planted (and start­ing to grow!). We’re going to start putting up cloches next week for win­ter grow­ing. It’s a happy farm! Come see for your­selves tomor­row at the work party!
Botany Green­house: 
Potluck-style break­fasts on Thurs­day morn­ings at the Botany Green­house started this week and will con­tinue weekly, 8am, fol­lowed by a FarmEd ses­sion led by Pro­fes­sor Ruesink at 8:30. Pro­fes­sor Ruesink talked about har­vest­ing, and we stuck around and har­vested 40 lbs of Brais­ing mix, cilantro and radishes to donate to the Uni­ver­sity Dis­trict Food Bank. They were so happy to see us! Next week, the FarmEd topic will be plant­ing (and, cloches).
Help? There are a few out­reach (tabling-type) events I would love your help on, if you’d be will­ing. I think we might be able to recruit farm­ers a bit bet­ter if they’re see­ing fellow-student faces than if they’re only see­ing mine. If you’re inter­ested in doing out­reach in the next cou­ple of weeks, let me know and I’ll send you the infor­ma­tion. And if you’re inter­ested in coor­di­nat­ing / recruit­ing for one, a cou­ple, or all of them, let me know, too! :)
(And, of course, if you ever get a han­ker­ing for some farm work with other folks, open work hours are Mon­day, Wednes­dayand Fri­day after­noons from 1-5pm at CUH, Tues­day after­noons from 1 to 5pm at Mer­cer Court apart­ments, and Thurs­day­morn­ings from 8:30-12pm at the Botany Greenhouse)

–Sarah

Dawg Daze Pizza Bake 9/28

 

To kick off the the new school year we have a bunch of events planned, cul­mi­nat­ing in a good, old-fashioned pizza bake at the Botany Green­house from 3-6pm.

If you’re inter­ested in being apart of the Farm or just want to see what all the buzz is about, this is the per­fect opportunity.

We’ll be har­vest­ing pro­duce ear­lier in the day, but as always, feel free to bring toppings!981919_633710139994706_896297964_o

[JOB] Trees for Neighborhoods hiring Student Assistant

The Trees for Neigh­bor­hoods project, spon­sored by Seat­tle Pub­lic Util­i­ties, helps Seat­tle res­i­dents plant trees around their homes. This fall, Trees for Neigh­bor­hoods pro­gram par­tic­i­pants will come to the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton Botanic Gar­dens’ Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture to pick up their free trees and to receive train­ing on how to prop­erly plant and care for their trees.

We have a short-term job oppor­tu­nity for up to 10 stu­dents to con­duct Trees for Neigh­bor­hoods tree plant­ing work­shops, teach­ing the com­mu­nity about tree plant­ing and care, assist­ing on deliv­ery and pick-up days, and pro­vid­ing logis­ti­cal support.

This is an excel­lent oppor­tu­nity for stu­dents to expand their expe­ri­ence in tree care and com­mu­nity outreach.

Job descrip­tion:

All work will occur at the Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture and will hap­pen rain or shine. Work­ers will be exposed to weather con­di­tions and must be able to lift at least 20 pounds. These posi­tions will pay $14/hour and offer between 20–60 hours total.

 Octo­ber 10, 11, 14, 15: Pos­si­ble Tree Deliv­ery Days

  • ·         Assist with unload­ing trees at the UW Botanic Gar­dens’ Cen­ter for Urban Hor­ti­cul­ture (spe­cific dates and times will be deter­mined at a later date)

Thurs­day, Octo­ber 17, 10:30am – 12:30pm: Manda­tory Training

  • ·         Learn more about the Seat­tle reLeaf pro­gram and Trees for Neigh­bor­hoods project
  • ·         Under­stand traf­fic flow and vari­ety of respon­si­bil­i­ties for Tree Plant­ing Workshops/Pick-up Days
  • ·         Train and prac­tice teach­ing the basics of how to plant and care for new trees

Plant­ing Work­shop Days
Sat­ur­day, Octo­ber 19, 8:00am – 3:00pm
Sun­day, Novem­ber 3, 9:00am – 3:00pm
Sat­ur­day, Novem­ber 16, 9:00am – 3:00pm

  • ·         Lead plant­ing mini-workshops
  • ·         Assist with hos­pi­tal­ity, traf­fic flow, and cus­tomer service
  • ·         Load trees and water­ing bags into vehicles

Pos­si­ble Addi­tional Work

  • ·         There may be oppor­tu­ni­ties for help­ing to pre­pare work­shop mate­ri­als and care for trees in-between workshops.

Qual­i­fi­ca­tions:

  • ·         Excel­lent ver­bal com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills
  • ·         Knowl­edge of and expe­ri­ence with tree plant­ing and care
  • ·         Expe­ri­ence com­mu­ni­cat­ing with the pub­lic and/or pro­vid­ing excel­lent cus­tomer service
  • ·         Abil­ity to work inde­pen­dently and as part of a team
  • ·         Abil­ity to lift at least 20 pounds

 

To apply, please send your resume to Jes­sica Farmer, UW Botanic Gar­dens Con­tin­u­ing Edu­ca­tion Coor­di­na­tor, at jsfarmer@uw.edu.