Author Archives: Jason Liu

Cannabis Legislation Round-Up: States That May Vote on Cannabis This November

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Used under the Creative Commons License

This November, at least 12 states may have cannabis legislation on the ballot. Although a limited number of states allow use of cannabis such as Colorado or Washington, this number may increase this year. Importantly, these may be trends of higher public acceptance towards cannabis. Furthermore, the increase in state legalized systems will place pressure on Congress to review the federal DEA laws listing cannabis as Schedule 1.  Continue reading

Mile “High” Stadium: Are We Ready for More Cannabis-Related Ads?

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image from O.penVAPE.

As cannabis businesses become prevalent, the public is likely to see more cannabis advertisements. Recently in Colorado, following the bankruptcy of the naming-rights holder of Mile High Stadium, a cannabis business, O.penVAPE, is expressing interest in becoming the next naming-rights owner. If this goes through, one of the most prominent football stadiums in the U.S. would advertise a cannabis business. However, there continues to be a conflict between legalized state systems and federal law, where cannabis is still illegal. In light of this conflict, what are states doing regarding cannabis advertising? Continue reading

Hotel California: Movement for the Initiative for Legalized Cannabis

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Used under the Creative Commons License.

This week in California, a ballot measure legalizing recreational cannabis met the signature requirement to get on the Nov. 8th ballot. As California qualifies as the 8th largest economy in the world, there would be tremendous effects if recreational cannabis was legalized. This blog post looks at the regulatory structure of the initiative. Continue reading

DEA Allows Clinical Study of Cannabis to Treat Veterans

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under Creative Commons License.

In a surprising move, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), agreed to allow clinical researchers to study the potential benefits of cannabis on veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As we discussed earlier, the DEA has taken a more open minded stance towards cannabis by considering a petition to reschedule cannabis. This may be a shift in DEA policy towards cannabis. Continue reading

Cannabis in the EU?

 

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under the Creative Commons License.

The CLPP Blog has been covering the cannabis policy in North America, and will now look at the European Union. This blog post will briefly review the cannabis policies of the major European nations from a unified EU perspective. Continue reading

Justice Scalia’s Death and the Supreme Court Cannabis Case

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under the Creative Commons license.

Recently, the International Business Times’s brought up a great point that Justice Antonin Scalia’s death may have a large impact on the current lawsuit filed by Nebraska and Oklahoma against Colorado. Nebraska and Oklahoma are suing Colorado regarding the flow of cannabis products from Colorado into Nebraska and Oklahoma where cannabis is banned. The justices are scheduled to be consider whether to hear the case on Friday, March 4th.

This blog post will not go into the merits of the current case, but rather evaluate Justice Scalia’s prior rulings related to cannabis cases and discuss possible impacts of his absence on the Court. However, it appears that the forecast on the current Colorado case may be still nebulous despite the loss of Justice Scalia. Continue reading

Washington State Cannabis News

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

MJ WASH

Here are some recent events happening in Washington State:

Increased Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board Pesticide Investigations

As the Stranger reported, two of Washington’s largest cannabis producers were barred from all sales pending a Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB) investigation.  The article details the investigation of New Leaf Enterprises and BMF Washington, LLC for the illegal use of pesticides.

The Stranger requested WSLCB documents through public records requests. The following documents published were:

As the Department of Health is gearing up to release the proposed rules for cannabis products this July, these investigations are signals to Washington State producers that the WSLCB makes pesticide compliance a priority.

New Bill that Proposes Home Cultivation of Cannabis 

House Bill 2629, was introduced in Washington’s House of Representatives to legalize the cultivation of a maximum of six cannabis plants for residents 21 and older. These “home” cultivators may possess up to 24 ounces from the plants.

Originally, in I-502, the bill drafter Allison Holcomb, noted that leaving out home cultivation was meant to minimize the possibility of federal intervention.

Currently, Colorado, Oregon, and Washington D.C. have laws that allow home cultivation. So far, there haven’t been prosecutorial interests by the federal government on these programs. If HB 2629 passes, it will place Washington State in line with the other home cultivation states and provide residents more options for cannabis use.

Washington State Hemp Bill Moving Forward

Senate Bill 6206 proposes the legalization of hemp.  The bill would empower the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) with authority to license hemp farmers, control seed supplies, and enforce restrictions of low levels of THC in cultivated hemp.

Currently, the bill passed the third reading in the Washington State Senate, and is being reviewed by the House committee of Commerce & Gaming.

Vermont May Legalize Recreational Cannabis

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under the Creative Commons license.

Vermont, home state of presidential Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders, currently has a senate bill that would legalize small amounts of marijuana for recreational use and create a framework for retail sales. Senate Bill 241 or S.241, recently passed the Committee on Judiciary with a favorable report, and is currently referred to the Committee on Finance. Continue reading

Cannabis Delivery Bill in Washington State

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

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Today Rep. Cary Condotta (R-East Wenatchee) and Christopher Hurst (D-Enumclaw) sponsored House Bill 2368 (HB 2368) which proposes a pilot cannabis delivery program.  The temporary program creates cannabis delivery endorsements which would be issued to existing cannabis retailers and allows the delivery of cannabis to a resident that is twenty-one or older at a private residence located in a city with a population greater than 650,000 (Seattle is the only city in the state of that size). Under RCW 69.50.382,  only “common carriers” or transporters of cannabis may transport cannabis products between licensed marijuana businesses located within the state.  Thus, the Bill may have a large impact on the current cannabis retailer landscape in Washington State. Continue reading