Category Archives: Advertising

CLPP to launch fundraising campaign with Snoop Dogg at Vela

By Sam Méndez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

Snoop3

A lot has happened in the last couple of weeks, with the [DEA’s announcement] that they won’t reschedule marijuana but will allow new entities to produce it for research purposes, ending the University of Mississippi’s monopoly on that front. We owe at least one blog post on those issues.

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Mile “High” Stadium: Are We Ready for More Cannabis-Related Ads?

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image from O.penVAPE.

As cannabis businesses become prevalent, the public is likely to see more cannabis advertisements. Recently in Colorado, following the bankruptcy of the naming-rights holder of Mile High Stadium, a cannabis business, O.penVAPE, is expressing interest in becoming the next naming-rights owner. If this goes through, one of the most prominent football stadiums in the U.S. would advertise a cannabis business. However, there continues to be a conflict between legalized state systems and federal law, where cannabis is still illegal. In light of this conflict, what are states doing regarding cannabis advertising? Continue reading

Washington Department of Health’s Campaign for Educating Parents & Kids

By Sam Mendez, executive director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

Back in mid-2014, the Washington State Department of Health (WSDOH) launched an advertising campaign to provide information regarding the state’s new marijuana laws to parents. It included radio ads with expert doctors along with online advertising, both particularly geared towards families of color. A second campaign was launched in early 2015 via transit and print publications. These campaigns were similar to those done in other states, including Oregon’s recent campaign and those done in Colorado.

Ads created by WSDOH aimed to reach parents.

Ads created by WSDOH aimed to reach parents.

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Why Oregon’s Coming Sales Tax on Cannabis May Be More “Taxing” than Anticipated

By Jeff Bess, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image taken by 401kcalculator.org.

Image  by 401kcalculator.org, used under Creative Commons License.

Oregon has long been known (and loved) for its lack of sales tax. It is one of five states that does not tax the sale of goods. However, Oregon will make an exception to its tax policy when it comes to cannabis.

A major rationale for state-level legalization of cannabis is the promise of tax revenues that can help fund education, infrastructure, drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs, and other social services.  Oregon’s northern neighbor Washington is projected to exceed one billion dollars over the next four years in tax revenue from the sale of recreational cannabis.  Oregon’s new sales tax, which will apply at a rate of 17-20% (localities have discretion to add up to 3% on top of the 17% state-level tax), is also expected to be a boon to the state’s budget.  Effectively implementing and enforcing any tax of that scale and actually realizing these anticipated fiscal benefits, however, presents challenges.

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U.S. Postal Service Warns Against Advertisements for Mailing Marijuana

By Sam Mendez, executive director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

If a recreational marijuana retail store advertised in a newspaper that was mailed to a residence, are they breaking the law?

© United States Postal Service. Use qualifies as fair use under copyright law.

© United States Postal Service. Use qualifies as fair use under copyright law.

In a surprising move, a Portland-based U.S. Postal Service (USPS) office issued a statement warning against advertisements for mailing marijuana pursuant to the USPS’s Domestic Mail Manual (DMM), and also citing to the Controlled Substances Act for ads seeking to sell or buy marijuana. The Oregonian reported the statement stating the USPS “warned newspapers that it is a felony to mail material that includes marijuana advertising. But the USPS statement never says it is a felony, nor do the laws that the statement cites to. Notably, the Oregonian pointed out that the statement came from a local office and not a regional or national office. Continue reading