Category Archives: International

CLPP hosted delegation from Jamaica’s Cannabis Licensing Authority

By Sam Méndez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

Late last month the Cannabis Law & Policy Project had the pleasure of hosting Jamaica’s Cannabis Licensing Authority (JCLA) here at UW Law to have a conversation with a few local experts about cannabis legalization. They were brought to us by Washington Office for Latin America’s John Walsh, and we were joined by attorneys Mitzi Hensley Vaughn (Greenbridge Corporate Counsel), Christine Masse (Miller Nash Graham & Dunn), and Robert McVay (Harris Moure). The full list of the JCLA representatives are below.

© Cannabis Law & Policy Project

© Cannabis Law & Policy Project

 

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Reflections on the Cannabis Science & Policy Summit

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

Earlier this week the NYU Marron Institute of Urban Management hosted the Cannabis Science & Policy Summit, produced by BOTEC. The two-day conference was held in New York City, and was summarized as follows: “With California and other states likely to vote on full cannabis legalization, decisions made in 2016 may well shape the future of cannabis policy for a generation or more. At the same time, scientific knowledge about the effects of cannabis on its users, and of cannabis policies on cannabis use and other outcomes, continues to grow.”

Cannabis Summit

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Cannabis in the EU?

 

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under the Creative Commons License.

The CLPP Blog has been covering the cannabis policy in North America, and will now look at the European Union. This blog post will briefly review the cannabis policies of the major European nations from a unified EU perspective. Continue reading

Comments on Mexico’s National Debate on Marijuana Legalization, Part 2

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

A protester carries a sign saying "Make a joint, not war." Photo: AFP

A protester carries a sign saying “Make a joint, not war.” Photo: AFP

The following reflects the views of the author and not necessarily that of the Cannabis Law & Policy Project or the University of Washington.

On Tuesday, March 8th, I was honored to take part in Mexico’s Third Forum of the National Debate on the use of Cannabis in Saltillo, Coahuila. The prior two Forums concerned public health, prevention, ethics, and human rights, while this Forum’s covered topics of economics and regulation. My presentation was largely similar to the one given at Mexico’s National Commission on Human Rights (see last week’s blog post), but shorter and without the discussion on cannabis’ dangers and human rights issues. Due to time constraints, I presented mostly on Washington’s marijuana regulatory system and its effect on the economy. Also, I spoke little in terms of advocacy, though some debate arose after presentations. Continue reading

Comments on Mexico’s National Debate on Marijuana Legalization, Part 1

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

IMG_5035

The following reflects the views of the author and not necessarily that of the Cannabis Law & Policy Project or the University of Washington.

Last Friday I had the privilege of presenting to the National Commission on Human Rights (NCHR), an office of the Mexican government in Mexico City, to provide a Washington perspective to their debate on marijuana legalization. As you may have heard, late last year the Mexican Supreme Court ruled in favor of four plaintiffs asserting the right to consume marijuana. What struck me the most about that case was that the plaintiffs weren’t asserting any medical necessity arguments. Instead, the plaintiffs argued that marijuana contributed to who they were as a person and thus had the right to consume it. While in their favor, the ruling was restricted to those four plaintiffs, and thus nothing changed for the rest of the country. Still, the Court seemed intent on sparking a national debate, which is exactly what it did. Continue reading

Holland’s Cannabis Law

Image used under Cre­ative Com­mons License.

As Washington, Colorado, and other states set forth legislation regulating cannabis, it is important to remember how institutions in the past dealt with cannabis. Review of a veteran of cannabis policy, such as Holland, could offer wisdom and useful model.  After all, no need to reinvent the wheel?  For many, Amsterdam immediately comes to mind as a bastion of legalized recreational drugs.  So, how do they handle legalized cannabis in the Netherlands? Continue reading

Looking Abroad for Regulatory Guidance: Legalized Cannabis in Uruguay

Image used under Cre­ative Com­mons License.

Policy makers across the country are being faced with the need to develop systems for regulating cannabis as there are few places that can serve as regulatory models.  When looking abroad to examine these systems of legalization, Amsterdam is well-known for its coffee shops and cannabis tourism.  But, as the first nation to officially legalize cannabis, Uruguay provides an example of a pragmatic national cannabis regulation program designed to address public health. Continue reading

Canadian Prime Minister Mandates a “Process that Will Lead to the Legalization of Marijuana”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is already working on fulfilling his campaign promise to legalize marijuana.  On November 13, 2015, he stated in a mandate letter to Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Jody Wilson-Raybould, that one of her “top priorities” will be to work with the “Ministers of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and Health [to] create a federal-provincial-territorial process that will lead to the legalization and regulation of marijuana.”

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo via Cannabis Culture under a Creative Commons License.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo via Cannabis Culture under a Creative Commons License.

In a politically unprecedented move to publish what is normally kept secret at the federal level, the letter is a lengthy list of campaign promises that were made public “so Canadians can hold us accountable to deliver on our commitments.” Continue reading

Is Legal Pot Coming to Canada?

Image used under a Creative Commons License

Image used under a Creative Commons License

Recent events hint at changes to Canada’s prohibition on marijuana.  With an election of Liberal Party candidate Justin Trudeau for prime minister, a shift in Vancouver marijuana licensing practices, and a recent Supreme Court ruling, there may be changes in the overall attitude towards marijuana.

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