Category Archives: Mexico

Analyzing Mexico’s Supreme Court Case on Legalization of Marijuana

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

Back on November 4, 2015, the Mexico Supreme Court effectively legalized marijuana for the four plaintiffs in the case before them. Wherever one stands politically on the question of marijuana legalization, how the Mexico’s Supreme Court came to their decision to legalize marijuana is downright fascinating because it was a constitutional issue related every Mexican’s “fundamental right to free development of one’s personality,” a right established in Mexico’s constitution.

Credit: Mexico Gulf Reporter

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Comments on Mexico’s National Debate on Marijuana Legalization, Part 2

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

A protester carries a sign saying "Make a joint, not war." Photo: AFP

A protester carries a sign saying “Make a joint, not war.” Photo: AFP

The following reflects the views of the author and not necessarily that of the Cannabis Law & Policy Project or the University of Washington.

On Tuesday, March 8th, I was honored to take part in Mexico’s Third Forum of the National Debate on the use of Cannabis in Saltillo, Coahuila. The prior two Forums concerned public health, prevention, ethics, and human rights, while this Forum’s covered topics of economics and regulation. My presentation was largely similar to the one given at Mexico’s National Commission on Human Rights (see last week’s blog post), but shorter and without the discussion on cannabis’ dangers and human rights issues. Due to time constraints, I presented mostly on Washington’s marijuana regulatory system and its effect on the economy. Also, I spoke little in terms of advocacy, though some debate arose after presentations. Continue reading

Comments on Mexico’s National Debate on Marijuana Legalization, Part 1

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

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The following reflects the views of the author and not necessarily that of the Cannabis Law & Policy Project or the University of Washington.

Last Friday I had the privilege of presenting to the National Commission on Human Rights (NCHR), an office of the Mexican government in Mexico City, to provide a Washington perspective to their debate on marijuana legalization. As you may have heard, late last year the Mexican Supreme Court ruled in favor of four plaintiffs asserting the right to consume marijuana. What struck me the most about that case was that the plaintiffs weren’t asserting any medical necessity arguments. Instead, the plaintiffs argued that marijuana contributed to who they were as a person and thus had the right to consume it. While in their favor, the ruling was restricted to those four plaintiffs, and thus nothing changed for the rest of the country. Still, the Court seemed intent on sparking a national debate, which is exactly what it did. Continue reading