Category Archives: Research

CLPP’s 2nd report for WSLCB is out, concerning cannabis-infused edibles & access to children

By Sam Méndez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

Today our second report for the Washington State Liquor & Cannabis Board (WSLCB) was released, announced by UW Today. The report is titled “Concerning Cannabis-Infused Edibles: Factors That Attract Children to Foods” and it seeks to provide WSLCB with a research foundation for regulating cannabis-infused edibles with children in mind, supporting some of their already established policies on the subject and providing the potential for new ones.

Photo: leafscience.com

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Our Canopy Report’s Data Available + A Few Reflections

By Sam Méndez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

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Our report titled “Estimating Canopy Size for the Washington Medical Marijuana Market” was released back on May 12, 2016, and yesterday the anonymous survey data was made available on our website (see the heading on the right titled “Canopy Study Data”). We received a request via email to provide this data, and provided that person with the data. At that time, in the interest of transparency we figured it best to make the data available for all and easy to obtain, thus we have done so.

To recap, the report estimated that between 1.7 and 2 million square feet of canopy space (meaning, square footage of marijuana plants) would satisfy the current medical marijuana demand in Washington State. The LCB currently has allotted 12.3 million square feet of canopy for the entire regulated marijuana market, so we concluded the current allotment is enough to satisfy the current demand for marijuana, both medical and recreational, for the time being. Continue reading

New Bill Proposes to Streamline Medical Cannabis Research

By Jeff Bess, third-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Photo by Laurie Avocado , used under Creative Commons License.

Photo by Laurie Avocado , used under Creative Commons License.

Despite how you slice it, medical marijuana is on the rise: as of earlier this month, 25 states and the District of Columbia permit medical use of cannabis and a recent US News poll shows 89% support among the public for medical marijuana programs. Additionally, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Alaska, and the District of Columbia have voted to legalize recreational use of cannabis by adults, and there is a strong probability that list will grow this November. Even among those states that have not formally adopted a medical or recreational program, numerous jurisdictions have decriminalized possession of the drug.  Continue reading

Cannabis Law & Policy Project’s First Report is Released

By Sam Mendez, Executive Director of the Cannabis Law and Policy Project

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We here at the Cannabis Law & Policy Project worked hard to produce the report titled “Estimating Canopy Size for the Washington Medical Marijuana Market” that was released today by the Washington State Liquor & Cannabis Board (LCB). A joint press release was also published, which provides a summary of the report’s background and findings. MJ Headline News has reported on today’s release.

The report estimated that between 1.7 and 2 million square feet of canopy space (meaning, square footage of marijuana plants) would satisfy the current medical marijuana demand in Washington State. The LCB currently has allotted 12.3 million square feet of canopy for the entire regulated marijuana market, and we believe that that amount is enough to satisfy the current demand for marijuana, both medical and recreational.

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DEA Allows Clinical Study of Cannabis to Treat Veterans

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under Creative Commons License.

In a surprising move, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), agreed to allow clinical researchers to study the potential benefits of cannabis on veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As we discussed earlier, the DEA has taken a more open minded stance towards cannabis by considering a petition to reschedule cannabis. This may be a shift in DEA policy towards cannabis. Continue reading

CLPP’s Medical Marijuana Survey

Photo by Wikimedia user Meganp - used under a Creative Commons license.

Photo by Wikimedia user Meganp – used under a Creative Commons license.

 

The University of Washington’s Cannabis Law and Policy Project (CLPP) will be working with the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (LCB) to research the amount of medical marijuana canopy space required to merge the recreational and medical cannabis markets, pursuant to House Bill 5052 and Senate Bill 2136. CLPP will be collecting data from existing dispensaries and collective gardens.

Earlier this month, LCB announced it would be granting an additional 222 retail licenses to accommodate medical marijuana patients as they transition from dispensaries and collective gardens to LCB licensed retail outlets. Those stores will need sufficient cannabis product to provide to patients who have been getting medicine from collective gardens, dispensaries, or the illicit market.

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Cannabis Research with Human Subjects?

By Jason Liu, second-year stu­dent at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton School of Law. 

Image used under Cre­ative Com­mons License.

Image used under Cre­ative Com­mons License.

As state-legal cannabis systems are developing, there is a growing interest in the research in cannabis. The Portland Tribune reported today that on Oregon creating a new task force (Senate Bill 844) to develop research frameworks for the study of cannabis.  The task force aims to lay the groundwork for state-backed medical marijuana research.  Other states have implemented similar frameworks.  However, because cannabis is listed as Schedule I under the Controlled Substances Act, the federal legal frameworks on cannabis provide researchers very limited opportunities to research cannabis.  The FDA noted that it “has not approved marijuana as a safe and effective drug,” however it “is aware there is considerable interest in its use to attempt to treat a number of medical conditions.”  With all of this interest, what is the proper regulatory pathway a researcher must take to research cannabis?

As “research” is broad, there are many ways cannabis can be researched (e.g., chemical analyses, genomic studies, animal studies).  In this post, we will review the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) guidelines for research on human subjects.  Because HHS heavily regulates the research of human subjects, looking at HHS protocols is a good place to start. Continue reading