The Edible Plant Life of Grand Ronde

Prior to my arrival at Grand Ronde I had a longstanding fascination with plants. One of my pastimes is identifying as many plants as possible anytime I’m outside. While at Grand Ronde I had the opportunity to be introduced to many first foods. Throughout our five weeks, my peers and I were guided through the methodology used to harvest, prepare, and consume these traditional plants at several different locations. The privilege to learn from a multitude of experts during my time at Grand Ronde has left me incredibly inspired to expand on my edible plant knowledge back home in California. I hope to continue to share the knowledge I have gained with friends, family, peers, and the public so we can all strive to develop a better understanding of the plant life around us.

Please enjoy the digital journey through some of the edible plant life of Grand Ronde:

Food Sources of Grand Ronde

 

References:

-Book Referenced: 

Deur, D. (2014). Pacific Northwest Foraging: 120 wild and flavorful edibles from Alaska blueberries to wild hazelnuts. Portland, OR: Timber Press.

-Link to Purchase: Pacific Northwest Foraging

-Chinuk Wawa Translations:

The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Chinuk Wawa Application

-Free Links to Download:

        -Chinuk Wawa-Google Play

        -Chinuk Wawa-App Store

-Photos Taken and Edited By: Sara Aguilar

-Blackberry Picking Video Taken and Edited By: Leah Bruce

 

 

 

Youth Archaeology Day

Aguilar, Flintknapping 2019

On Thursday July 18th, the FMIA team along with Chris Bailey and the HPO staff facilitated Youth Archaeology Day with the Youth Ed students. The activities took place around Chachalu and included a variety of stations. The two that I primarily worked were flintknapping and the bow and arrow station. My experience with bow and arrows was exclusively with compound bows so it was really interesting to learn along with the students on how to properly shoot the more traditional type. It took a lot of trial and error but I was able to shoot off three arrows.

After the bow and arrow station I went over to flintknapping with Sara. This was my first time participating in flintknapping. I have always thought the process was incredible so it was a privilege to be able to participate as a student and to also teach the students of Youth Ed. The materials we used at our flintknapping station included obsidian, antlers, gloves, leather pads, safety goggles, and a tarp to catch falling flakes. The method Sara Gonzalez (our Field Director) taught us was pressure flaking. This involved using the leather pads for protection against the sharp obsidian as we used the antlers to apply pressure and pop off flakes and shape our points.

One student was was able to craft an Ishi1 point in roughly 45 minutes.

Ishi Point Example, Puget Sound Knappers

Seeing his dedication and expertise was inspiring and motivated me to continue working my point even after slicing my knuckles twice. The closing activity took place in the mini plank house and focused on the students asking us questions they had about archaeology and us as individuals. This included our inspiration and education journey that led to us being here at Grand Ronde. One of the questions we were asked was when we knew we wanted to be an archaeologist. I shared that it had been a passion of mine since childhood and my love for it continued to grow through the years as I read anthropology and archaeology related books and spent time in museums.

The mutual learning environment that was created during Youth Archaeology Day solidified my desire to focus my leadership project on creating curriculum for junior high through high school students to work in the collections and archives in the Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO). In having a background in both anthropology and education, I think it’s vital to listen to what is important to the students when crafting a curriculum. Understanding their strengths and skills and learning from them is just as important as any lesson plan I could craft and teach with my expertise. I look forward to creating a collaborative learning space at Grand Ronde that can be used for years to come.

Ishi Point Photo CreditPuget Sound Knappers

For Additional Information on Ishi: “Ishi, the Last Yahi”

 

What Sara Said

Hey there! I’m Sara, a 2019 graduate from San Francisco State University. I majored in anthropology and minored in education. My interest in archaeology and anthropology began when I took a trip to the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose with my Grandmother when I was 5 years old. I remember being in absolute awe seeing a sarcophagus for the first time and walking through the tomb recreation. I got involved in education first as a para educator and then as a literacy tutor at the elementary level. Research interests include contemporary conflict archaeology. In the future I would love to create programs and curriculum to make archaeology and anthropology more accessible to K-12 students.

Aguilar, Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum 1997