Meet Zoey

Enjoying sediment columns at Milepost 31

Enjoying sediment columns at Milepost 31

Zoey Whisler is an under­grad­u­ate in her fourth year at the Uni­ver­sity of Wash­ing­ton, graduating in summer of 2015. Zoey is get­ting her bach­e­lors degree in Anthropology, specializing in Archaeological Sciences, with a minor in Geology.

Born and raised in Seat­tle, Zoey is the fourth gen­er­a­tion of her fam­ily liv­ing in the North­west, so local archae­ol­ogy and geol­ogy have been a pas­sion from a young age. Grow­ing up she was encour­aged by her par­ents to be involved in sci­ence and cul­ture, a mix­ture of her par­ents inter­ests rub­bing off on her. In kinder­garten, Zoey was intro­duced to archae­ol­ogy by doing an archae­o­log­i­cal dig of her back­yard for her first sci­ence fair project, unfor­tu­nately the bones she found were not a new species to be pub­lished as she hoped but were instead chicken bones from a rather recent com­post pile. When she entered col­lege,

Zoey had already been intro­duced to many fields of sci­ence through her school­ing and fam­ily, but after tak­ing some col­lege courses she even­tu­ally found a love for archae­ol­ogy, geol­ogy, and paleontology.

Zoey’s inter­ests in archae­ol­ogy and geol­ogy are diverse and she is excited to explore new aspects of the fields and have the oppor­tu­nity to dis­cuss them in the for­mat of blogging. Working with the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde’s Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) provides the unique opportunity to work with and for the tribe on projects that they feel most beneficial to the community.

About Zoey

zoey and soil

Zoey Whisler (pictured above at the Milepost 31 museum in Seattle) is an undergraduate in her fourth year at the University of Washington. Zoey is getting her bachelors degrees in Archaeological Sciences and Geology and does her research within the paleontology department.

Born and raised in Seattle, Zoey is the fourth generation of her family living in the Northwest, so local archaeology and geology have been a passion from a young age. Growing up she was encouraged by her parents to be involved in science and culture, a mixture of her parents interests rubbing off on her. In kindergarten, Zoey was introduced to archaeology by doing an archaeological dig of her backyard for her first science fair project, unfortunately the bones she found were not a new species to be published as she hoped but were instead chicken bones from a rather recent compost pile. When she entered college, Zoey had already been introduced to many fields of science through her schooling and family, but after taking some college courses she eventually found a love for archaeology, geology, and paleontology.

Currently Zoey does her research on prehistoric shrews from Western Montana that are 25 to 28 million years old and even had the opportunity to present her findings at the 2014 Geological Society of America Conference. Still, Zoey’s interests in Archaeology and Geology are diverse and she is excited to explore new aspects of the fields and have the opportunity to discuss them in the format of blogging.