Category Archives: Courses

Apply to the 2019 Summer Institute in the Arts and the Humanities

Calling all undergraduates in the arts and humanities wanting a different world.

The application for the 2019 Summer Institute in the Arts and the Humanities is now open, and this year’s theme is “Creating Alternate Worlds”.

To learn more about how to apply and to sign up for an information session, please visit: http://www.washington.edu/undergradresearch/siah/

Sign up for Research Exposed!

Looking for classes to take next quarter? Sign up for Research Exposed! The 1 credit course features weekly presentations by faculty in all academic disciplines, giving students a look into ongoing research projects at UW and information about how to get involved.

This winter quarter, URP is excited to announce that Research Exposed is partnering with the UW Population Health Initiative to offer faculty lectures (including one by President Cauce!) focused on all aspects of human health. For more information, including the course speaker schedule, visit: http://www.washington.edu/undergradresearch/research-exposed/winter-2018-speaker-schedule/

Courses: Friday Harbor Labs in 2016

In Spring, Summer and Autumn 2016, Friday Harbor Laboratories, located on beautiful San Juan Island 75 miles NW of Seattle, will offer undergraduate and graduate-level courses and internships in marine science.

Please check out the attached flyer! FHL FLYER 2016

And here’s a link to the FHL website: http://depts.washington.edu/fhl/

We encourage you to forward this message and/or print and post the attached flyer. Thank you for helping us get the word out about upcoming courses at Friday Harbor Labs!

I’d be happy to answer any questions you may have.

Stacy Markman, Student Coordinator
University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratories 620 University Road, Friday Harbor, WA 98250

 206-616-0753

WIN 2016 Course: Research Ethics (PHIL 241)

A great winter quarter class for any student who attends a research institution:

PHIL 241 Topics in Ethics: Research Ethics

TTh 11:30-12:50 plus a F quiz section (11:30-12:20 or 12:30-1:20)

5 credits

I&S/VLPA, Optional “W” credit

Is there research that scientists shouldn’t do?

  • Are scientists responsible for harm caused by their research?
  • What role do (or should) social values play in science?
  • Can risks to animal or human subjects can be justified in the name of science?
  • What does scientific fraud teach us about research integrity?
  • How do scientists navigate the conflicting demands of funding agencies, industry, stakeholders, and their own research communities?
  • Should scientists play an active role in policy debates that depend on the results of their research?

Every aspect of our lives is affected by scientific research. Most of us will be research subjects at one time or another; all of us are affected by science-based policies; our everyday-lives have been transformed by the results of scientific research – in good and bad ways.

Permanent link: http://webster.uaa.washington.edu/liaison/?p=1268
Posted via the UW Academic Advising Liaison website.
Contact jstock@uw.edu for access.

WIN 2016 Course: Advanced Health Services Research Methods, HSERV 524, SLN 15196

HSERV 524: Advanced Health Services Research Methods II: Hierarchical and Incomplete Data

Instructor: Dr. Joe Unger

4-5 Credits

Mondays/Wednesdays

1:30-3:20pm

University of Washington Seattle campus, HSB T474

Health Services 524 will cover the topics of causal inference, missing data, multilevel models, and incomplete follow-up data. For multilevel models, emphasis will be placed on both conditional and marginal models and their interpretations. For incomplete follow-up data, students will be exposed to survival analysis methods, including competing risks and censored medical cost. The emphasis of this course is on developing a working capability with advanced biostatistical techniques in applied research. Students are expected to understand statistical concepts qualitatively and be able to formulate statistical models. However, mathematical details are not the emphasis in this course.

 

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  1. Understand and apply statistical methods for analyzing missing data
  2. Understand counterfactual models and graphical approaches to causal inference
  3. Model correlation in multilevel data
  4. Apply suitable statistical methods for answering scientific questions using multilevel data and survival data
  5. Identify statistical issues related to incomplete follow-up data
  6. Implement the analyses using STATA
  7. Interpret the results appropriately to a non-specialist
  8. Critique the methods used in health services literature

Prerequisite: either HSERV 523 or permission of instructor.

Questions? Contact Professor Joe Unger:  joeunger@gmail.com

To register, visit UW Seattle Time Schedule: https://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/WIN2016/hlthsvcs.html, SLN# 15196

Winter Quarter Class: Reflections on Undergraduate Research (INTSCI 492)

INTSCI 492: Reflections on Undergraduate Research (2 Credits, NW)

Are you participating in undergraduate research in the biological, environmental, or physical sciences? Would you like to:

  • Demystify research culture and develop research skills?
  • Discuss research papers with a diverse community of undergraduate researchers?
  • Develop a research proposal and increase your competitiveness for research scholarships and graduate & professional programs?
  • Present your research in oral and written formats & improve your science communication skills?

INTSCI 492: Reflections on Undergraduate Research (2 credits, NW) is a discussion-based course that is designed to accompany undergraduate research experiences. Students engage in a reflective learning community with fellow undergraduate researchers to (1) learn about research culture, including mentoring relationships, (2) identify, analyze, and discuss research papers that are relevant to projects, (3) draft, comment on, and revise research proposals, and (4) present research in oral formats.

“Taking the class helped me to become a better scientist through analyzing my work more in depth, focusing on the correct questions to ask, and learning what should be said and what should be excluded in a scientific statement.”

 “Through interactions with my peers, instructor, and reading materials, I gained significant insight toward understanding myself as a science communicator and the professional nuances I will face during my future in research. … I also made great progress with addressing my use of logic and organization when talking and writing about my research.”

 “The most important contributor to my learning was that we were a diverse group of undergraduate researchers. We were at different stages in our research and worked in different subfields, and, because of that, we had unique perspectives on research.”

 — Past Students

INTSCI 492 will meet on Mondays, 3:30-4:50 p.m., during Winter Quarter. INTSCI 492 has no prerequisites, but students must participate in undergraduate research concurrently. For more information or to request an add code, please email the instructor at: bjb@uw.edu

INTSCI 492 Flyer

 

INTSCI 492: Reflections on Undergraduate Research (2 Credits) – Winter 2016

Winter quarter registration is here! Here’s an opportunity to complement your current involvement in undergraduate research!

Are you participating in undergraduate research in the biological, environmental, or physical sciences? Would you like to:

  • Demystify research culture and develop research skills?
  • Discuss research papers with a diverse community of undergraduate researchers?
  • Develop a research proposal and increase your competitiveness for research scholarships and graduate & professional programs?
  • Present your research in oral and written formats & improve your science communication skills?
INTSCI 492: Reflections on Undergraduate Research (2 credits) is a discussion-based course that is designed to accompany undergraduate research experiences. Students engage in a reflective learning community with fellow undergraduate researchers to (1) learn about research culture, including mentoring relationships, (2) identify, analyze, and discuss research papers that are relevant to projects, (3) draft, comment on, and revise research proposals, and (4) present research in oral formats.
“Taking the class helped me to become a better scientist through analyzing my work more in depth, focusing on the correct questions to ask, and learning what should be said and what should be excluded in a scientific statement.”
 
“Through interactions with my peers, instructor, and reading materials, I gained significant insight toward understanding myself as a science communicator and the professional nuances I will face during my future in research. … I also made great progress with addressing my use of logic and organization when talking and writing about my research.”
 
“The most important contributor to my learning was that we were a diverse group of undergraduate researchers. We were at different stages in our research and worked in different subfields, and, because of that, we had unique perspectives on research.”
 
— Past Students
INTSCI 492 will meet on Mondays, 3:30-4:50 p.m., during Winter Quarter. INTSCI 492 has no prerequisites, but students must participate in undergraduate research concurrently. For more information or to request an add code, please email the instructor at: bjb@uw.edu

Intsci

A New Course in Digital Humanities for Undergraduates!

The Newbook Digital Texts in the Humanities research team has been funded to teach an experimental course on Digital Humanities for undergraduates at every level.  Based on the learning gained from training many very successful undergraduate interns, the course—entitled An Introduction to Digital Humanities (NEAR E 296/596 B)—will explore current Digital Humanities methods, tools, topics and debates.  Students will have a unique and exciting opportunity for the hands-on application of digital tools to our unpublished primary source material from the Near and Middle East (no area or language expertise required!) in a collaborative setting in one of the UW’s most advanced and amazing classrooms  (OUGL 141-check it out!).

  • Humanities and social sciences students will become familiar with tools and technologies that will enhance their abilities to succeed both as undergraduate researchers and in their lives after graduation.
  • Students in technology disciplines will be able to explore the application of a wide range of programming skills to humanistic endeavors.
  • One student with an outstanding class project will be funded to attend a national or international DH conference in the spring of 2016.

Registration information can be found here:  http://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/AUT2015/neareast.html/
[The Autumn class will be limited to 35 students, so try to register as early as you can.]

The instructor, Digital Humanities expert and Egyptologist, Dr. Sarah Ketchley can be contacted for more information at ketchley@uw.edu.

Contact Prof. Walter G. Andrews at walter@uw.edu  for Digital Humanities internship opportunities available with Newbook Digital Texts ( http://depts.washington.edu/ndth/ ).

 

DH Course

International Summer School in London: Program in Medicine

Imperial College London Faculty of Medicine Summer School 2015: Revolutions in Biomedicine

This year, Imperial’s Faculty of Medicine is launching its first International Summer School. With an overarching program theme of ‘Revolutions in Biomedicine’, the School will provide a research-centered, academic course for bioscience and medicine undergraduates (or recent graduates) from around the world.

The school will:

  • Give insight into past, present and future revolutions in biomedicine through lectures, interactive group sessions and seminars
  • Give experience of experimental design and the creativity of research by immersion in a laboratory research project

Programme benefits for the students:

  • Gain academic credit and enhance their CV
  • Intensive and stimulating study at a top world top ten ranked university
  • Interact with world-leading medical researchers
  • Experience London’s rich cultural and historical heritage
  • Make new friends and develop a strong network of contacts
  • Enjoy our lively social program

Key facts:

  • Website: www.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/summerschool
  • Dates: 29 June to 17 July 2015 (3 weeks)
  • Students: bioscience and medicine undergraduate (and recent graduates) (no course cap for overseas students)
  • Academic credit: 7.5 ECTS, 3-4 US (the student’s own institution will determine how much credit is awarded)
  • Fees: £3,500 for both home/EU and overseas students (does not include accommodation or travel)
  • Modules:
    o   ‘Immunology and Infection: welcome to the future’
    o    ‘Advanced therapeutics in heart and lung research’
    o   ‘Analytical and therapeutic revolutions in cancer and reproductive biology’
    o   ‘Global health challenges’

Plus:

  • A week-long tissue culture and pharmacology mini-research project on controlling cell proliferation
  • Keynote lectures from prestigious speakers
  • A career perspective and insight session
  • An exciting social program to help you discover London, learn about English culture and start life-long connections
  • The chance to secure a scholarship awarded to the student (home/EU or overseas) who can best demonstrate outstanding academic potential. The scholarship will cover tuition fees, accommodation, travel and reasonable living expenses

You can find the link for a printable version of the course flyer here.

Please see our website for more information and contact the Summer School Administrator Dr Jim Osborne (james.osborne@imperial.ac.uk) if you have further enquiries.

UW Archaeology Study Abroad Program in Spain- Deadline Feb 6

 

Discovering Ancient Mediterranean Spain: Excavation and Survey of the Iron Age site of Mestre Ramon – Application deadline is February 6

Program Dates: July 23, 2015 – August 21, 2015 (Summer B term)
Location: Son Servera, Mallorca, Spain

Credits: Students will earn 12 credits of ARCHY 270

Program Description:
In this program, students will join a team of American and Spanish archaeologists in order to learn various techniques of archaeological fieldwork (excavation and surveying) and laboratory analysis. Students will live in the town of Son Servera on the island of Mallorca and participate in fieldwork for four weeks. Several weeks will be dedicated to learning the ins and outs of archaeological excavation including stratigraphy, profile plan drawing, field photography, total station mapping, and recording. Remaining weeks will be dedicated to learning the techniques of archaeological survey (i.e., systematically walking through the countryside while collecting and recording traces of past human behavior using GPS equipment). Throughout the four weeks, students will learn basic procedures for cleaning, processing, labeling, and recording artifacts that they collected in the field.

Outside of these unique field experiences, students will be immersed in the local Mallorcan culture and will learn about the history of the Balearic Islands. Weekend day-trips will include visits to some of the spectacular archaeological sites and museums on the island.

Who can apply?
Ideal candidates would be undergraduate or graduate students interested in archaeology and ancient history: Anthropology (in particular those on the Archaeological Sciences track), Classics, History, Geography, or Spanish Languages and Literature. However, interested students from other fields are encouraged to apply as we value a multi-disciplinary team.

This program is designed for people who want to learn and practice archaeology including those without previous fieldwork experience. You will work under the close supervision of professional archaeologists that will teach you what you need to know.

Interested students should visit leiap.weebly.com to learn more about the program and the ongoing research.

How to apply?

Students should apply through the UW Study Abroad website. Application deadline is February 6.

Send any questions or inquiries to leiap@uw.edu. We would be happy to meet with you to discuss the program.

UW Program Directors:
Dr. Marcos Llobera, Associate Professor, Anthropology
Jacob Deppen, PhD student, Anthropology